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(34 Posts)
Esri Regular Contributor

General:

How a print service works?

Security:

What's new in printing service?

Few technical notes:

Advanced - report, charts, map-series etc.

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Occasional Contributor

                Our IT services has deployed anti-ransomeware software (ARS).  ARS is an important tool to help protect our data from ransomware attacks.  The government of PEI was recently hit with a ransomware attack in February 2020.   

On April 7th ARS was deployed on our network storage. Our data store, config store, file geodatabases and raster tile caches are stored on our network storage.  Coincidentally, we have noticed stability issues with the our ArcGIS servers through most of April.  On April 30th the network storage team helped us identify a pattern that showed stability issues with the our ArcGIS Servers that coincided with the dates and times of events logged by the ARS software. 

 

Before I continue let me strongly state “There has NOT been a ransomware attack on our ArcGIS servers.

 

We believe that normal ArcGIS Server operations might mimic ransomware activity.  This triggers the ARS software to log an event and then begin to take snapshots of our files on the network storage servers.  We suspect the snapshotting may be interfering with the normal operation of ArcGIS Server.  Some of our users have reported failed map service requests and we have witnessed missing raster map tiles in our tile cached basemaps.

 

Since April 30th the Isilon server team has disabled the ARS snapshotting activity for our storage space on the network servers.  This appears to have improved the stability of our ArcGIS servers but we are continuing to closely monitor for problems.

 

If ARS has been deployed on your storage servers and you are having stability issues with ArcGIS Server you should dig a little deeper.  Have the ARS logs reviewed to see if they mention the ArcGIS Server admin account and see if the dates and times in the logs coincide with dates and time of ArcGIS Server problems.  Good luck!

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Esri Contributor

As you may have heard, due to the continuously evolving circumstances around COVID-19, last week’s Esri Developer Summit plenary was held in front of an empty audience.  If you missed the Livestream of the plenary, do not worry - it can all be found here.  And, better yet, the focus of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise is the Dev Summit Plenary Highlights.  The highlights included:

1. Big data analysis using GeoAnalytics Tools

2. Use raster analytics and the ArcGIS API for Python to monitor coral bleaching

3. Automation comes to ArcGIS Notebooks

This Week

 

 1. Big data analysis using GeoAnalytics Tools

Sarah's demo at the plenary covered how, using Apache Spark, GeoAnalytics performs parallel analysis to analyze vector and tabular datasets in both ArcGIS Enterprise and ArcGIS Pro.  Without Spark, each tool has to be executed separately; with Spark, a function can be written to chain multiple tools together.   With the run_python_script tool, Sarah’s workflows can be streamed across ArcGIS GeoAnalytics Server.  Read more for yourself here.  As a bonus, check out the related video here.

2. Use raster analytics and the ArcGIS API for Python to monitor coral bleaching

Vinay’s ArcGIS Image Server plenary demo covered how analysis tools in raster analytics can process multidimensional data.  Utilizing both Notebooks and the ArcGIS API for Python, he created a model that helped illustrate and comprehend the impact of sea surface temperature on coral bleaching.  These tools empower users to build custom applications and automate their raster workflows.  Check it out for yourself in this blog and this video

3. Automation comes to ArcGIS Notebooks

Automating tasks can make life easier for ArcGIS Enterprise administrators.  At the Dev Summit plenary, Jay spoke of three types of automation: simple, advanced, and intelligent.  As this blog mentions, it is important for organizations to understand and consider these types of automation so that they can make the best decisions for their organizations.  Starting with ArcGIS Enterprise 10.8, ArcGIS Notebooks have an "Execute Notebook" option.  This option allows administrators to automate notebook execution – to run an existing notebook without manually accessing the notebook.  Read more about this for yourself here.  To see the demo for yourself, watch the video here

Thanks for keeping an eye out for This Week's Picks!  And, as always, thank you for reading and please feel free to reach out in the comments below 
 if there are any outstanding questions, comments, or suggestions for future topics.  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

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Esri Contributor

Get excited, the focus of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise is all things 10.8!  For those who missed it, ArcGIS Enterprise 10.8 released last month on February 20th.  And while we can't cover everything in the 10.8 release in this edition of This Week's Picks, what we'll be doing an overview of the new functionality.

1. Overview of What's New in 10.8

2. What's New in 10.8 Portal Administration

3. What's New in 10.8 Data and Publishing

 

This Week

 

1. Overview of What's New in 10.8

Want an overview of the 10.8 highlights? Check out this video put out by me and my fellow Product Advocacy Lead, Peter. I'll be the first to admit, we had a blast making it, but we also made a point to cover what we consider to be the top new features and functionality in this release: user type extensions, data store items, new group settings, read-only mode for the ArcGIS Enterprise portal, an information banner, hosted map image layers, and vector tile enhancements.  Watch it for yourself here.

 

And, as an added bonus (or if watching videos just isn't your favorite thing to do), take a moment to check out this blog that also covers what's new in 10.8.

 

2. What's New in 10.8 Portal Administration

With an overview of what's new covered, we can shift our focus to new functionality in specific aspects of ArcGIS Enterprise…  We'll be starting with ArcGIS Enterprise portal administrators.  They tend to have a lot of responsibility, comprised of tasks both big and small.  With each release, the product introduces new functionality to make these tasks simpler.  New features in 10.8 that do just this include the access notice, information banner, and new group capabilities. Jeffrey and Marley's blog does a deep dive on these new features, including what they are and how to configure them within your own Enterprise portal.  Take a look for yourself here.

3. What's New in 10.8 Data and Publishing

10.8 has brought a lot of new functionality to data and publishing. This blog goes into the top five new data and publishing related features, including creating data store items, using field descriptions and field value types to provide context about your data, working with auto-calculate length and area values, and publishing hosted map image layers, and other enhancements.  Hilary's blog goes into not only what the functionality is but also when it could be useful for you to implement.  Read more for yourself here.

Hope you're all as excited about 10.8 as I am!  As always, thanks for keeping an eye out for This Week's Picks.  Please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions, comments, or suggestions for future topics.  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

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Esri Esteemed Contributor
4 8 502
New Contributor III

                With a previous article connected to Chef Kitchen: https://community.esri.com/people/TNickolai-esristaff/blog/2019/11/18/chef-test-kitchen-for-arcgis-e... we hit on the utilization of VirtualBox/Vagrant to create virtual machines quicker and test deployments via Chef.  The key part of this concept is getting your own Vagrant Box to utilize with these tests.  The Vagrant Box can be pre-configured with certain tools or content to allow you to have a ready to go deployment of a Virtual system to then test on with our ArcGIS on-premises software.  I wanted to put together this article to give you the ability to create your own Vagrant Box following easy steps.

 

Download/Install Virtual Box and Vagrant:

Virtual Box: https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads

Vagrant: https://www.vagrantup.com/downloads.html

-Follow the defaults for the installation/setup.

 

1.) Getting a Windows Microsoft 2019 ISO

2.) Launch Virtual Box

-Top left of the VirtualBox UI, Machine, New.

  • -Provide a Name
  • -Provide a Machine Folder (where the machine's VirtualBox configuration will be placed).
  • -Version: select Other Windows (64-bit)
  • -Memory Size: select a relevant amount (like 5GB).  Caution, this RAM is tied to the hosting system.  You need to take into account how much RAM your system has before the allocation of RAM to the Virtual Box deployment.
  • -Do not add virtual hard disk.

   

3.) Virtual Box Machine Settings.

-System:

  • Make sure the RAM is still set to a proper level
  • Click on Processor, update the processor(s) to a proper level (remember we need to be aware of our own systems resources)

 

-Storage:

  • Add Optical Drive (the ISO we downloaded from step 1).
  • Add hard disk.  Create a Virtual Hard Disk, Select VHD, Fixed Size, provide the location this VHD will be utilizing space from and provide the amount of disk space the VHD will be using.
  • We want to make sure this hard disk is large enough to be able to host an Enterprise deployment.  70GB+ should be sufficient.  Remember this is a clean deployment without any of the OS installation completed so true space available following our setup with 70GB is going to be about 58GB.

       

The remaining configurations we can leave as default.

 

4.) Launch our Virtual Box machine.

  • On the home page for VirtualBox, select the machine listed, right-click, Start.
  • The Machine will launch and open a new window that will run through the beginning steps of an Operating System install.
  • Select the defaults listed.  When we hit "Select the operating system you want to install" be sure to select the "Windows Server 2019 Standard Desktop Experience" as this will have the GUI involved.
  • Select Custom Install, select your lone drive for the Windows installation, hit next.  The system will begin to install the 2019 Windows OS.
  • You will need to provide a password to the Administrator username, be sure to make note of this password

5.) Preparing the VB Machine for Vagrant.

  • Open Windows Server Manager, Tools, Local Security Policy, Account Policy, disable "Password must meet complexity requirements"
  • Add a user called vagrant with the password vagrant.  Open Computer Management, Local Users and Groups, Users, right-click and select New User. 
    • Call the user "vagrant" and password "vagrant". 
    • Go to Groups, Administrator, add the vagrant user to this group and hit ok.
  • At the top of the VirtualBox display, we will see "Devices", click on this and then "Insert Guest Additions CD".

                           CAUTION:  If the version of Guest Additions is 6.0.6, there is a bug that will cause your Virtual System to crash when syncing a folder.  Pending on the version of Virtual Box downloaded, you might need to download and "insert" the proper Guest Additions: Index of http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/6.1.6 (Find Guest Additions download).

  • Open File Explorer on the Virtual Box system, click on the CD drive, run the "VBoxWindowsAdditions" application, follow the defaults for the install.
  • We need to change the security settings for users (we don't want vagrant being prompted when it utilizes winrm to access the system).  Control Panel, User Accounts, User Accounts, Change User Account Control Settings, Set the bar to the lowest setting.
  • We also can run:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System /v EnableLUA /d 0 /t REG_DWORD /f /reg:64   

  • Open Command Prompt as Admin.  Run the following commands,one at a time, to configure our winrm: 

winrm quickconfig -q

winrm set winrm/config/winrs @{MaxMemoryPerShellMB="512"}

winrm set winrm/config @{MaxTimeoutms="1800000"}

winrm set winrm/config/service @{AllowUnencrypted="true"}

winrm set winrm/config/service/auth @{Basic="true"}

sc config WinRM start= auto

 

  • We need to change PowerShell restriction policies so the vagrant commands aren't stopped to accept restrictions.  Run the following command in PowerShell:

Set-ExecutionPolicy -ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted

 Once prompted, type A and hit enter to accept all changes.

  • We need to enable remote access capabilities.  Access Control Panel, System and Security, System, Advanced System Settings, Remote, Select the radial for "Allow remote connections to this computer" and disable the checkbox below this radial.

 

Optional Steps:

Since this will essentially be a server container and remain the same with every deployment, we can take this time to install applications such as Notepad++ or different browsers, change settings, etc. 

            -You could also upload the installation packages for Esri software and have them ready for use (make sure you do not license the software though as the vagrant packaging process will break the license storage).

 

6.) Packaging our VirtualBox system for re-use.

  • On our local system (desktop/host) we will need to create a Vagrantfile.rb file.  Simply open Notepad or Notepad++ and copy/paste the below section:

 

# -*- mode: ruby -*-

# vi: set ft=ruby :

# All Vagrant configuration is done below. The "2" in Vagrant.configure

# configures the configuration version (we support older styles for

# backwards compatibility). Please don't change it unless you know what

# you're doing.

 

Vagrant.configure(2) do |config|

config.vm.guest = :windows

config.vm.communicator = "winrm"

config.vm.boot_timeout = 600

config.vm.graceful_halt_timeout = 600

 

# Create a forwarded port mapping which allows access to a specific port

# within the machine from a port on the host machine. In the example below,

# accessing "localhost:8080" will access port 80 on the guest machine.

#

#config.vm.network "forwarded_port", guest: 80, host: 8080

config.vm.network :forwarded_port, guest: 3389, host: 3389, id: 'rdp', auto_correct: true

#config.vm.network :forwarded_port, guest: 5985, host: 5985, id: "winrm", auto_correct: true

 

config.vm.provider "virtualbox" do |vb|

#

# Customize the name of VM in VirtualBox manager UI:

vb.name = "Windows2019"

 end

end

 

  • This file helps vagrant communicate with the VirtualBox via winrm.  Save this file as a .rb.
  • We will now package the VirtualBox system into a vagrant box.
  • Open PowerShell as admin and run the following command: 

vagrant package --base Windows2019 --output E:\boxes\windows2019.box --vagrantfile E:\Vagrantfile.rb   

  • The PowerShell will begin to package the VirtualBox as a vagrant box. This could take some time, but, once this is completed, we have one final command to run which will box the package:  

vagrant box add E:\boxes\windows2019.box --name windows2019

 

At this point, we have now created a Windows 2019 vagrant box which can now be utilized with Virtual Box via Chef Kitchen and test Enterprise deployments or Desktop deployments: https://community.esri.com/people/TNickolai-esristaff/blog/2019/11/18/chef-test-kitchen-for-arcgis-e...

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Esri Contributor

It's time for This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.  As you may know, within ArcGIS Enterprise, ArcGIS Server can be licensed for a variety of different roles.  There is of course ArcGIS GIS Server, necessary to deploy a hosting server in your base ArcGIS Enterprise deployment, but there's also:

  • ArcGIS Image Server
  • ArcGIS GeoEvent Server
  • ArcGIS GeoAnalytics Server
  • ArcGIS Notebook Server
  • ArcGIS Business Analyst Server

Each role has its own unique capabilities.  Instead of just describing the capabilities of each, we're going to take a look at specific examples of ArcGIS GeoEvent Server, ArcGIS GeoAnalytics Server, and ArcGIS Notebook Server.  It doesn't matter if you've only ever used a base deployment of ArcGIS Enterprise or if you've only ever used ArcGIS Enterprise for analyzing your big datasets…  After reading this edition of This Week's Picks, you'll be thinking, Wow, ArcGIS Enterprise can do that?

We’ll be covering:

1. Dynamic geofence synchronization in GeoEvent Server

2. Detecting Water Utility Leaks with GeoAnalytics Server

3. What is ArcGIS Notebook Server?

This Week

1. Dynamic geofence synchronization in GeoEvent Server

This blog explores the concept of geofences -  a location-based concept that is set up so that when A occurs within a boundary, B is triggered.  For example, when a moose wearing a GPS collar walks into a park boundary, the local wildlife department gets an email notification.  These boundaries, such as a park's border, are typically static.  “Typically” is the keyword there – sometimes the boundaries are dynamic.  Think about boundaries that change; a meteorologist might need to track wind speeds within a moving hurricane.  Never to fear, GeoEvent can accommodate both static and dynamic boundaries.  This blog describes the workflow in order to do this, provides demo data, and a video to go through it step by step.  Check it out for yourself here.

2. Detecting Water Utility Leaks with GeoAnalytics Server

This blog explores how a data analysis workflow for a water utility enables the organization to make better business decisions and improve operations.  It starts with creating a space time cube in ArcGIS Pro, filtering the results, taking a look at trends through ArcGIS Pro's emerging hot spots tool, and then joining features.  This concept is not just relevant to water utilities though; GeoAnalytics can help out any organization that needs to process, analyze, and understand their larger data sets faster.  Read more for yourself in this blog here.

3. What is ArcGIS Notebook Server?

Released in ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7, ArcGIS Notebooks leverage ArcGIS Notebook Server by providing a Jupyter notebook environment in ArcGIS Enterprise.  Once set up and licensed, ArcGIS Notebooks allows for you to run analysis and build models right within your GIS system of record.  It's not just for data science - you can use ArcGIS Notebooks to clean up portal items or notify web map authors of broken links.  The best thing is that you can share these notebooks with others; once you have your notebook configured, you can distribute them - allowing for not only transparency but also reproducibility.  Take a look at this blog for more details.


Thanks for reading This Week's Picks!  As always, please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions, comments, or suggestions for future topics.  I'd love to hear from you!  And be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

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Esri Contributor

Welcome back to This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise!  In past editions, we've been focusing on ArcGIS Enterprise: the product but haven't gotten into ArcGIS Enterprise: the backbone of your GIS workflows.  In many organizations, ArcGIS Enterprise is integrated with other components of the ArcGIS platform - including ArcGIS Pro, ArcGIS Online, and Esri's suite of essential, field, and office apps.  All of these have unique considerations to keep in mind when working with ArcGIS Enterprise.

 

That said, the focus of this edition of This Week's Picks is ArcGIS Enterprise and field apps.  We'll be diving deeper into this topic by looking into:

1.  ArcGIS Secure Mobile Implementation Patterns

2.  Troubleshooting connecting to ArcGIS Enterprise on your iOS device

3.  Disconnected Editing with Collector for ArcGIS and ArcGIS Enterprise

This Week

1. ArcGIS Secure Mobile Implementation Patterns

This whitepaper is a great resource that acknowledges that, in recent years, the transition from office-based to field-based GIS workflows has forced IT architects to be strategic in deploying an effective enterprise GIS strategy.  It goes into almost all possible WebGIS deployment patterns, as well as considerations for different field apps.  Whether setting up your environment for the first time or wanting to see where your deployment fits in, this whitepaper is worth checking out - take a look for yourself here.

2. Troubleshooting connecting to ArcGIS Enterprise on your iOS device

In later versions of iOS, an issue can arise when connecting to your ArcGIS Enterprise portal if you aren't using a valid certificate; this error is particularly common if you're using a self-signed certificate.  While self-signed certificates aren't designed for production use, they can be great for internal testing.  So, how do you get around this error?  This technical article from Support describes the solution and, while written with Collector for ArcGIS in mind, the steps are helpful when connecting ArcGIS Enterprise to any Esri field app.  For the exact workflow, look at the steps outlined here.

3. Disconnected Editing with Collector for ArcGIS and ArcGIS Enterprise

The focus of this Esri Canada video is using Collector for ArcGIS for offline editing of a feature service, coming from a registered enterprise geodatabase, in ArcGIS Enterprise.  It breaks down the workflow step by step, from feature class creation to data collection and syncing, and also covers important considerations start to finish.  Even if you know this workflow by heart, this short video is a great refresher - be sure to check it out for yourself here.

 

And these are just some of the considerations to have in mind when using field apps with ArcGIS Enterprise!

Thanks for keeping an eye out for This Week's Picks!  And, as always, thank you for reading and please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions, comments, or suggestions for future topics.  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

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Esri Contributor

Get excited - the focus of this edition of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise is migrations.  Now the word "migration" can be ambiguous, as it's thrown around in a variety of contexts: migrating from on-premise to the cloud, migrating from 10.5.1 to 10.7.1, migrating from one form of WebGIS deployment strategy to another, etc.  Those are all valid examples of migration, but they are not the only examples of migration.

To clear up any confusion, the focus of this blog is two types of migration: migrating from ArcGIS Server to ArcGIS Enterprise and migrating ArcGIS Enterprise to a new machine.  Now that we're all on the same page, we're going to be going through these two types of migrations by covering:

1. Migrating to ArcGIS Enterprise

2. Migrating ArcGIS Enterprise to a new machine, using the Join Site operation

3. Migrating ArcGIS Enterprise to a new machine, using the WebGIS DR tool

This Week


1. Migrating to ArcGIS Enterprise

This comprehensive video from Esri Australia provides a great list of considerations when making the move to ArcGIS Enterprise from another type of WebGIS deployment, such as a standalone ArcGIS Server site.  The considerations they bring to light include thinking about your hardware if the cloud should be used, potential monitoring and backups, the need for SSL certificates, and more.  This is a great resource for anybody looking to migrate to ArcGIS Enterprise or explore a deployment’s capabilities.  Take a look for yourself here.
 

2. Migrating ArcGIS Enterprise to a new machine, using the Join Site operation

This blog is a wonderful resource for those already using ArcGIS Enterprise and wanting to move their deployment to another machine (this could be due to the new machine having more available resources or a newer operating system).  There are many different choices you can choose when migrating ArcGIS Enterprise to a new machine.  This blog covers the use of the Join Site operation, typically used to add standby machines for highly available deployments and disaster recovery workflows.  Outlining the steps of this migration workflow, including sections specific to each ArcGIS Enterprise component, this blog is a must-read for anybody looking to migrate their ArcGIS Enterprise site using the Join Site operation.  Read more here in this blog.

3. Migrating ArcGIS Enterprise to a new machine, using the WebGIS DR tool
Building on what was discussed in the previous blog, this blog covers a second option for migrating your ArcGIS Enterprise deployment to another machine: the WebGIS DR tool. While this utility exists to create and restore backups and maintain a replicated standby environment for disaster recovery, it can also be used to migrate our ArcGIS Enterprise environments. While more complicated than the Join Site operation discussed in the previous blog, this WebGIS DR tool has the option for you to validate whether the migration was successful before switching to the new environment.  For more details on this workflow, as well as pros and cons, take a look at this blog here.

 

With that, hopefully, you are feeling more confident about migrating to ArcGIS Enterprise and migrating ArcGIS Enterprise deployments to different machines.  As always, thank you for reading and please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions or comments.  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

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