Pipe Connections

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03-08-2022 01:31 PM
TheoSnead
New Contributor II

 

I would appreciate an elaboration on why connecting pipes to a manhole is different from connecting them to the pipe connection features. With regards to pipe tracing, what does the pipe connection feature add? Is it necessary to use pipe connections when modeling a network from ESRIs Sewer Network Solution? 

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9 Replies
AlexKabak
Esri Contributor

Hi Theo,

Mains (SewerLine) are sewer network features and manholes (StructureJunction) are structure network features in the Sewer Utility Network Foundation solution. Sewer features cannot snap to structure features. To accommodate this, we added connection points (SewerDevice), which are also sewer network features, for the pipes to snap to.

With regards to tracing, if both pipes meet at the pipe connection the trace should continue as normal. If the pipes are split apart, an association needs to be in place between both pipe connections. The trace then knows to traverse from one pipe connection to the other and continue.

Alex

TheoSnead
New Contributor II

Thank you for that clarification, Alex. 

Do you think you could elaborate on the need for Manhole Channel (Sewer Device) for all of this? In the solution is appears to sit directly on top of the Manholes (Structure Junction). 

The Pipe Connections and Manhole channel are all contained by the Manhole (Structure Junction) right? 

Theo Snead

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AlexKabak
Esri Contributor

Hi Theo,

The Manhole Channel was added as a device feature so that pipes can snap to the manhole, since the manhole is a structure feature and pipes can't snap to it. All of this was done to help accommodate vertical attributes. 

In many instances, Pipe 1 enters the manhole at elevation A and pipe 2 exits the manhole at elevation B. If they both connect to the manhole with different elevation attributes they will not be considered connected by the network. This is why we added the connection points at the end of the pipes, pull the pipes back, and associate the connection points to the manhole channel. It allows the pipes to be at different elevations, and they are considered connected by the network because they associated by connection.

 

TheoSnead
New Contributor II

Could you also elaborate removal of fields? For example are you able to remove all the fields associated with cathodic protection? 

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AllysonReynolds
New Contributor III

Alex,

For a simpler network, would it make sense to just have the manhole be a subtype of the sewerDevice rather than part of the Structure domain?

Thanks,

Ally

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SSMIC3038
Occasional Contributor III

Were in the middle of a UN rollout and this is what we did, we didn't want to educate the client in the default data setup and didn't think they would find it very intuitive.

The downside is you will have to chase down all the necessary customizations, rules changes, etc.

AlexKabak
Esri Contributor

Hi Ally,

If you don't need to record vertical attributes, or have no intention to do so in the near future, you can certainly make that adjustment (or even change the alias of the Manhole Channel asset type). As SSMIC3038 says, it would require changes to the default set up. 

We designed manholes in their current format to accommodate vertical attributes (see my above comment to Theo) and to more accurately represent a manhole in the real world, which is why it is designed to pull the pipe back to the edge of the manhole rather than meet in the middle.

Also, if you have no need to trace, in addition to not needing to map vertical assets, and are looking for a simple way to map assets , we also have the Sewer Data Management solution. 

 

 

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TheoSnead
New Contributor II

Hi Alex, 

Figured I would add on to this discussion because manhole channels have been discussed. Could you describe what a directional manhole channel is? What about about this feature makes it a Subnetwork Controller in the Esri Sewer Solution? 

Best, 

Theo

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AlexKabak
Esri Contributor

Hi Theo,

Directional Manhole Channels are set as the subnetwork controller for the Sewershed tier. All pipes within that subnetwork will eventually lead to that Manhole.

It is called a directional manhole channel because it is set with a directional terminal. The directional terminal, or more specifically the Upstream terminal within the Directional Terminal configuration, is what allows it to be a subnetwork controller (subnetwork controllers within a sink network must be set on an Upstream terminal). The terminals also allow for a more defined flow within the manhole.

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