How does one use, not edit, a parcel fabric once it is created? Must all parcels in a community be a part of the fabric?

131
4
07-23-2020 12:06 PM
PeterBourne
New Contributor

What does Parcel Fabric gain a GIS shop not charged with maintaining land records?

0 Kudos
4 Replies
jcarlson
Regular Contributor II

You don't specify ArcMap or Pro Parcel Fabric, but as an employee of just such a department as you describe, I can tell you that we benefit immensely from the parcel fabric data model.

We use the Pro Parcel Fabric. Because the parcel types are organized as simple feature layers, we are easily able to publish web layers from them, and to construct complex Query Layers to join our parcels with our on-premise assessment database in ways that were simply not possible (or not nearly as easy) as they are with the parcel fabric.

We also benefit considerably from the record-centric structure. We are able to locate changes to the cadastre and tie them directly to recorded documents simply by using the Parcel Fabric. Previous staff had attempted to achieve this on their own with a simple topology and half a dozen auxiliary layers, resulting in considerable double-work, and as a result, greater errors.

- Josh Carlson
Kendall County GIS
PeterBourne
New Contributor

Josh,

 

Thanks for the quick response.   Our shop is not charged with maintaining land records thus no assessment database.  We have many other parcel based datasets which may need to follow a history and not be tied to a cadastre, can they be administered somehow by using parcel fabric or a polygon fabric?

0 Kudos
jcarlson
Regular Contributor II

Oh, I'm sorry, I missed the not in your original question. But yes, you could certainly use the parcel fabric in the way you describe. I've seen a couple cases where the parcel fabric was used to track historic changes to a landscape, and others where it was used for different zones and districts that were not necessarily about taxation and ownership. You can make the "record" feature which tracks the changes refer to anything you like. So while the data model is clearly geared towards land records, a "record" could just as easily be "changes following board meeting: 07-23-20", or "boundary adjustment based on some event", things like that.

I'd say if you have multiple layers that are subject to change, you could probably benefit from organizing them in a Parcel Fabric. All the more so if more than one feature or multiple layers might all change due to the record / event.

- Josh Carlson
Kendall County GIS
0 Kudos
PeterBourne
New Contributor

Might you have references /contacts of these other cases?  Looking for others thinking outside the box.

0 Kudos