Help me understand which enterprise geodatabase (mainly PostgreSQL question)

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07-06-2016 06:11 AM
AdrianWelsh
MVP Notable Contributor

I cannot find a good list that tells me what I am looking for. My company currently has ArcGIS for Server Workgroup, Standard license. Does this mean that I can only use Microsoft SQL Server Express as my Enterprise Geodatabase?

If I was presented with a PostgreSQL database, would I not be able to connect to this database due to the type of license that I have?

All of the documentation I have found tells me that I need to download the installation files from My Esri. (http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.3/manage-data/gdbs-in-postgresql/get-started-gdb-in-postgresq...) If there are no installation files, is it safe to assume that I cannot use this type of database?

I believe I heard Derek Law mention the database limitations in one of his talks at the UC, but I cannot find that in his presentation slides.

Thanks in advance!

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VinceAngelo
Esri Esteemed Contributor

Databases aren't generally things that people leave open to allow anyone connection rights.  In fact. most DBAs spend a great deal of effort to prevent that from happening (aided by the built-in firewall  of the PostgreSQL server).

PostGIS geometries are real geometries, just like the native geometry types of other databases.  There are tons of tutorials out on the interwebs; I recommend you just dive in to get your feet wet.

- V

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VinceAngelo
Esri Esteemed Contributor

While it's theoretically possible to use SQL Server Express as an enterprise geodatabase (if you're willing to sacrifice performance to a down-throttled RDBMS), you have a Workgroup license, which only works with Express (and has storage, RAM, and user limitations).

You can access a PostgreSQL database using Direct Connect without an Enterprise Server license (which is necessary to create or enable  a enterprise geodatabase), but you'll only be able to access Query Layers (PostGIS storage)

- V

AdrianWelsh
MVP Notable Contributor

Vince,

I appreciate the feedback. I currently do not have an example PostgreSQL database that I can play with to test things (unfortunately). When you say that you are only able to access query layers, what is this limiting me to? What can I not access with the licensing that I have?

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PanagiotisPapadopoulos
Esri Regular Contributor

Commercial databases support simple spatial features.

Geodatabases build on this framework and extend the capabilities of your database to ensure that you can enrich your GIS data models and satisfy the most demanding GIS workflows such as the following:

 Long transactions and conflict resolution (versioning)

 Modeling of utility, water, and transportation networks (geometric networks and network datasets)

 Data validation including topological, attribute, and connectivity rules (topologies)

 Tracking of historic transactions (archiving)

 Complex features: annotations (text), dimensions, parcel fabrics, etc.

 Advanced symbology (cartographic representations)

 Replication across multiple commercial databases in connected and disconnected environments (geodata services)

ArcGIS for Server Enterprise level supports multiuser geodatabases on the following relational database management systems (RDBMS):

 Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL  Amazon RDS for Microsoft SQL Server  IBM DB2  IBM Informix Dynamic Server  Microsoft SQL Server  Oracle  PostgreSQL ArcGIS for Server Workgroup level only supports Microsoft SQL Server Express. ArcGIS for Desktop Standard or Advanced includes tools to create a multiuser geodatabase.

http://www.esri.com/library/brochures/pdfs/arcgis-server-functionality-matrix.pdf     pages 17 & 18

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VinceAngelo
Esri Esteemed Contributor

PostgreSQL is free software. It has a small footprint and is easy to install (I don't have a copy installed on my toaster oven, but it is running on the microwave).

Without an enterprise geodatabase license, you don't have enterprise geodatabase functionality (I'm not going to paste scores of pages of documentation into this thread)..  Query Layers are nice, but they're just tables with geometry columns, which is a pale shadow of what is possible in a versioned geodatabase.

- V

AdrianWelsh
MVP Notable Contributor

Vince,

Do you know of any sample PostgreSql databases that I can connect to in order to explore a little bit? Can query tables be viewed, more-or-less, like feature classes can be viewed (with seeing points, lines, and polygons)? Or is it only like a table table that will say things about the geometry (like size and shape)?

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VinceAngelo
Esri Esteemed Contributor

Databases aren't generally things that people leave open to allow anyone connection rights.  In fact. most DBAs spend a great deal of effort to prevent that from happening (aided by the built-in firewall  of the PostgreSQL server).

PostGIS geometries are real geometries, just like the native geometry types of other databases.  There are tons of tutorials out on the interwebs; I recommend you just dive in to get your feet wet.

- V

AdrianWelsh
MVP Notable Contributor

Thanks Vince. I understand that most relational databases will be secured. I will look for tutorials and such to hopefully get some learning in.

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by Anonymous User
Not applicable

"ArcGIS for Server Workgroup level only supports Microsoft SQL Server Express." , page 18 at http://www.esri.com/library/brochures/pdfs/arcgis-server-functionality-matrix.pdf

Regards

Jesús de Diego

AdrianWelsh
MVP Notable Contributor

There's the one-line that I have been looking for. Thanks for digging that up.

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