How to insure that arcpy/Pro license is "returned" by script?

354
1
03-10-2020 12:05 PM
Arne_Gelfert
Regular Contributor

Is there any way that a 'named user' Pro license that is being consumed by a service account has to be released so that the same account can "check out" this license on another machine? I know there is no real check in/out for named users. But I'm running into an issue where I want to have the same account running the same script on different machines but it will only complete on the first machine. I can schedule it to run on either machine over night and it runs fine. As soon as I want to run it on both machines, it will fail on the second one.

I've wrapped my import into try/except to make sure that's really where it's failing:

try:
   import arcpy

except Exception:
   with open(r'C:\temp\arcpyIssue.log','w') as failurelog:
      failurelog.write("Unable to get arcpy license")

and that appears to indicate the arcpy import is the issue? Any thoughts? Shouldn't I be able to run as many instances of Pro or Pro licensed Python under the same account as I want? I seem to have no issues having instances of Pro open on multiple machines using my own account.

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1 Reply
JoshuaBixby
MVP Esteemed Contributor

According to Frequently asked questions—ArcGIS Pro | Documentation :

Can I run ArcGIS Pro on more than one machine?

The answer depends on the licensing model you're using:

  • When connected to ArcGIS Online or ArcGIS Enterprise with a Named User account, you can log in on up to three machines at the same time. If you're disconnected and have your license set to work offline, you can work with the one machine that has been taken offline.
  • One Single Use license can be used to authorize one user on one machine.
  • Concurrent Use licenses allow authorization of one machine per license at a time, drawing from a pool of shared licenses.

Assuming you are running online Named User licensing, you should be able to run three sessions at the same time.  It is probably going to be an Esri Support case to work through this one, especially because it seems like a defect if running a stand-alone ArcPy script doesn't adhere to licensing.