Calculating partial population of census tracts within buffers

3194
3
07-13-2012 11:02 AM
ChansooByeon
New Contributor
Hello,

I am fairly new to GIS and I am trying to find out how many people fall into a neighborhoods (area of impact) for nurseries.

The neighborhoods are irregular shape file and I did 300 m buffers around 17 different sectors.

The 300 m buffers from all the 17 sectors at times overlap often two and three overlap and sometimes 4 sectors overlap.


Below the above two layers are census tracts with number of population field.

My question is what is the best way to calculate how many people will fall under each buffers for each sectors.
I presently lack the knowledge of using Phyton.

Thank you!

[ATTACH=CONFIG]16086[/ATTACH]
0 Kudos
3 Replies
ChansooByeon
New Contributor
Please help anyone!
0 Kudos
JonathanQuinn
Esri Frequent Contributor
You'll want to clip the census tracts boundaries by the buffers layer, then run a dissolve on each group and use the statistics fields section to get the sum of the population fields.  I think you'd want to use the Iterate Feature Selection iterator throughout the process to make sure you run each process, (clip, dissolve, etc) separately on each buffer boundary, since they overlap.
0 Kudos
ChansooByeon
New Contributor
You'll want to clip the census tracts boundaries by the buffers layer, then run a dissolve on each group and use the statistics fields section to get the sum of the population fields.  I think you'd want to use the Iterate Feature Selection iterator throughout the process to make sure you run each process, (clip, dissolve, etc) separately on each buffer boundary, since they overlap.


Thank you so much for your reply.

I have a question about your solution.
I just realized clipping could keep the proportions of original attributes in the new output! Thank you!
I am uncertain on how to perform Iterate feature... Would I also be able to take into consideration of the overlapped parts? I do not want to count them three times for instance. I want to only count them once and perhaps divide them into three (if there are three overlapping)..


Best,
C
0 Kudos