How to open polygons with extensions of .cor & .dsp

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12-27-2015 08:13 AM
SamLimerick
New Contributor

I have some polygon files with extensions of shp, dbf, prj, cor & dsp. ArcCatalog reports "error opening feature class". Any ideas how to convert these to readable shapefiles?  .cor may be CorelDraw, probably not Trimble; dsp has me baffled. Thanks!

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ChrisSmith7
Frequent Contributor

Regarding .shp, .dbf, and .prj, those are components of a shapefile. Typically, you'll have about 7 file components of a shapefile - not all are required, but you absolutely must have at least the following:

.shp

.shx

.dbf

Here's the complete list:

  • .prj — projection format; the coordinate system and projection information, a plain text file describing the projection using well-known text format
  • .sbn and .sbx — a spatial index of the features
  • .fbn and .fbx — a spatial index of the features that are read-only
  • .ain and .aih — an attribute index of the active fields in a table
  • .ixs — a geocoding index for read-write datasets
  • .mxs — a geocoding index for read-write datasets (ODB format)
  • .atx — an attribute index for the .dbf file in the form of shapefile.columnname.atx (ArcGIS 8 and later)
  • .shp.xmlgeospatial metadata in XML format, such as ISO 19115 or other XML schema
  • .cpg — used to specify the code page (only for .dbf) for identifying the character encoding to be used
  • .qix — an alternative quadtree spatial index used by MapServer and GDAL/OGR software

Shapefile - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Make sure the shapefile you are attempting to open has the three mandatory files - I would recommend you have the .prj as well, so long as it's valid (looks like you do). If you don't have it, but are 100% certain of the projection, you can define this in ArcMap using the Define Tool. Like I said, only use this if you need to define the .prj and know the projection used to create the shapefile originally.

Here's some info on salvaging a corrupt shapefile, if that's an issue for you:

27429 - Recover a corrupt shapefile

Regarding the other files, it's been awhile, but if I'm not mistaken, a .cor is a post-processed/corrected .ssf - you should be able to export from Pathfinder to shapefile. Regarding the .dsp - this may be related to Optitex (a CAD software); a marker file:

Optitex | 3D Virtual Prototyping, 2D CAD Pattern + Fashion Design Software

Knowledge:CAD File Extension - OptitexHelpEn

Marker:Save As - OptitexHelpEn 

I have no experience with this software...

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2 Replies
ChrisSmith7
Frequent Contributor

Regarding .shp, .dbf, and .prj, those are components of a shapefile. Typically, you'll have about 7 file components of a shapefile - not all are required, but you absolutely must have at least the following:

.shp

.shx

.dbf

Here's the complete list:

  • .prj — projection format; the coordinate system and projection information, a plain text file describing the projection using well-known text format
  • .sbn and .sbx — a spatial index of the features
  • .fbn and .fbx — a spatial index of the features that are read-only
  • .ain and .aih — an attribute index of the active fields in a table
  • .ixs — a geocoding index for read-write datasets
  • .mxs — a geocoding index for read-write datasets (ODB format)
  • .atx — an attribute index for the .dbf file in the form of shapefile.columnname.atx (ArcGIS 8 and later)
  • .shp.xmlgeospatial metadata in XML format, such as ISO 19115 or other XML schema
  • .cpg — used to specify the code page (only for .dbf) for identifying the character encoding to be used
  • .qix — an alternative quadtree spatial index used by MapServer and GDAL/OGR software

Shapefile - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Make sure the shapefile you are attempting to open has the three mandatory files - I would recommend you have the .prj as well, so long as it's valid (looks like you do). If you don't have it, but are 100% certain of the projection, you can define this in ArcMap using the Define Tool. Like I said, only use this if you need to define the .prj and know the projection used to create the shapefile originally.

Here's some info on salvaging a corrupt shapefile, if that's an issue for you:

27429 - Recover a corrupt shapefile

Regarding the other files, it's been awhile, but if I'm not mistaken, a .cor is a post-processed/corrected .ssf - you should be able to export from Pathfinder to shapefile. Regarding the .dsp - this may be related to Optitex (a CAD software); a marker file:

Optitex | 3D Virtual Prototyping, 2D CAD Pattern + Fashion Design Software

Knowledge:CAD File Extension - OptitexHelpEn

Marker:Save As - OptitexHelpEn 

I have no experience with this software...

DanPatterson_Retired
MVP Esteemed Contributor

Use ArcMap and see if the Add Data option will open the shapefile.

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