Shows surface elevation's problems

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04-27-2021 10:16 AM
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Marianna_bassi
New Contributor

Hello! 

I've started used arcgis pro, for work, two weeks ago, so  I'm just starting out : 

I've a Las, Dsm, Dem and Tin files of a pavement which presents some imperfections (holes and small bumps)

I would like to create some graphical rappresentation which shows, maybe using tin files, the surface's trend: I was thinking something like  everything in the same z-quote rappresented is one colour and the hole zone shown in an another colour (i've already discovered the elevation symbology but the holes are very small , i would prefer something which shows them better). 

Is this possible? if yes, someone can help me?

Thank you so much

Marianna

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4 Replies
DavidPike
MVP Frequent Contributor

I'm a bi rusty on my Hydro toolset, but perhaps it can be utilised for this purpose. Sink (Spatial Analyst)—ArcGIS Pro | Documentation and bumps might be derived from the inverse of the DEM.  Shot in the dark though.

jcarlson
MVP Frequent Contributor

Focal Statistics could be helpful in this, though I don't think it will solve this on its own.

For each pixel, Focal Statistics can calculate a statistic for that pixel's neighborhood. Something like Range would be useful in finding the edges of sudden changes in elevation, such as a hole or bump. There's a great document that explains it in more detail : https://pro.arcgis.com/en/pro-app/latest/tool-reference/spatial-analyst/how-focal-statistics-works.h...

I'd expect the output could then be symbolized to identify those areas.

Also, take a look at Raster Functions, which you can use to highlight those areas without creating a secondary output.

- Josh Carlson
Kendall County GIS
Robert_LeClair
Esri Frequent Contributor

I wonder if the Cut Fill geoprocessing tool would do the trick between 2 elevation raster datasets?

From the help - "The Cut Fill tool summarizes the areas and volumes of change from a cut-and-fill operation. By taking surfaces of a given location at two different time periods, it identifies regions of surface material removal, surface material addition, and areas where the surface has not changed."

Tim_McGinnes
Occasional Contributor III

You could use your DEM file to display a hilllshade as shown on this page: https://www.esri.com/about/newsroom/arcuser/create-amazing-hillshade-effects-quickly-and-easily-in-a... 

The Z Factor parameter may also be useful to overcome the small differences in elevation like it sounds you have.

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