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We've developed a robust, dependable desktop application for backing up your entire ArcGIS Online org - feature layers, maps, apps, Survey123 packages, static files, and anything else you might have in there. Backups are local and you don't have to share your credentials with us. Backups can be sorted by item owner and filter by group, tag, owner, or folder(s), and you can add or remove delete protection for items included in the backup. Plus, you get a full item inventory with title, description, summary, number of views, tags, create/modify date, spatial reference, and owner.

 

We're a featured app on the ArcGIS Marketplace for July (listing), and we offer a free two-week trial.

 

Wondering what to expect from ArcGIS Online at our virtual User Conference? Our focused agenda will help you identify ArcGIS Online topics that interest you and plan your schedule for July 13-16. The agenda includes live sessions (only available at the time listed) and on-demand sessions (available any time). 

 

See ArcGIS Online's session agenda in this blog article

 

We look forward to connecting with you at our virtual User Conference! In addition to the sessions, ArcGIS Online will have a virtual showcase where you can chat and schedule meetings with members of the ArcGIS Online team. 

 

Helpful links: 

 

Tip: Once the UC opens (Monday, July 13 at 12:00 a.m. PDT), add live sessions to your calendar. The appointment will include a link that brings you directly to the session. 

 

 


As GIS professionals, the value of the work you do with location intelligence has been proven out time and time again this year -from the John Hopkins dashboard tracking the spread of COVID-19, to businesses using location intelligence to optimize and adjust supply chains.  In the recently released Forrester Wave™: Location Intelligence Platforms, Q2 2020, Forrester has proclaimed now to be golden age of location intelligence, and Esri has been named a leading location intelligence platform provider. 

 

According to the report, Esri is “enabled by its vision of location intelligence, which focuses on delivering business insights to customers by helping them visualize and analyze location in the context of enterprise data.” The Forrester Report acknowledges Esri’s strengths in data management, data products, spatial visualization and analytics, and location intelligence execution.

 

Recent events have emphasized the extent to which leaders in the public and private sectors rely on location intelligence to quickly respond to crises, pivot operations, and understand and act on global socio-environmental change.  Esri empowers these leaders with a complete set of location intelligence capabilities and helps you and your organization achieve your digital transformational goals.

 

We encourage you to read and share the Forrester report with your colleagues and managers.  The invaluable work you do with Esri’s location intelligence technology enables data-driven decision making and helps your stakeholders understand the significance of place.

 

Read the report

Since it was introduced in December 2018, Arcade FeatureSets have made it possible to include data from several layers and tables in one ArcGIS Online pop up. However, like some of our distant relatives, it’s difficult to see the connection between the layers and tables. Today we’ll look at how we can use Arcade FeatureSets to connect a separate layer and table through common attributes, and bring all relatives to our Arcade family pop up.

For this example we'll use Groundwater level measurements published by the CALIFORNIA natural resources AGENCY.

  1. Groundwater well station locations (Feature Layer)

  2. Groundwater levels - monthly mean (Related Data - Table)

    • itemId: 426460a6ae7c47b5acb9a64294bd3dcb layerId: 0

Access 'Groundwater levels - monthly mean' table as a FeatureSet

Before we get started, I suggest you take a look at the following web map to familiarise yourself with the end result we're working towards.

click on features to see related data fetched from the Groundwater levels - monthly mean table.

If you want to follow along, save a copy of the web map to your account (you'll have the option to open and save the web map in Map Viewer Beta or Map Viewer Classic). Afterwards, add an Arcade attribute expression to the Groundwater well station locations layer and use the following code snippet to bring in all features from the Groundwater levels - monthly mean (Related Data - Table).

Note: if you'd prefer to copy and paste the code, the entire code snippet can be found at the end of this blog post.

Refer to this blog if you'd like to learn more about FeatureSetByPortalItem() and how to bring in features from another layer or table by using its itemId and layerId.

Filter related features by using a common attribute

Whether you like it or not, we all share common attributes with our relatives. This is also the case with related data. In our example the common attribute is the Station Id, where the field names are called STATION for both the feature layer and related table. Use the following code snippet to filter relatedData.

Refer to this blog if you'd like to learn more about the Filter() function and how to filter related records by using a common attribute.

Pro tip - Make sure to take advantage of the   Test   button to check related features for different Station Ids.

Note: if you're working with related tables in  Survey123  the 2 common field names are likely to be globalid for the feature layer, and parentglobalid for the related table. Attached below is an example filterStatement.

var globalid = $feature.globalid
var filterStatement = 'parentglobalid = @globalid'

Sort related features by oldest to newest

Just like organising table arrangements for a family event, it is important that related data in popups are sorted in some order. Use the OrderBy() function to achieve this in Arcade FeatureSets.

Build the pop-up string by iterating through all related features

Use the following For loop to iterate through all features in the FeatureSet and build the popup string. Again, take advantage of the  Test  button to check popupString results for different Station Ids.

Refer to this blog if you'd like to learn more about working with data inside FeatureSets.

Dealing with empty attributes

Finally, use the DefaultValue() function to replace any empty attributes with a default value or text.

Putting it all together

Here is the entire code to get your party started.

// Acess 'Groundwater Levels Monthly Mean' table as a FeatureSet
var portal = Portal("https://www.arcgis.com")
var waterLevels = FeatureSetByPortalItem(portal,
   "426460a6ae7c47b5acb9a64294bd3dcb", 0, ['STATION', 'MSMT_DATE',
   'RPE_WSE', 'GSE_WSE', 'WSE'])

// Filter related features by using a common attribute
var STATION = $feature.STATION
var filterStatement = 'STATION = @STATION'

// Related features as a variable
var relatedData = Filter(waterLevels, filterStatement)

// Sort related features by oldest to newest
var relatedDataSorted = OrderBy(relatedData, 'MSMT_DATE ASC')

// Build the pop-up string by iterating through all related features
var popupString = ''
for (var f in relatedDataSorted){
   
   popupString += Text(f.MSMT_DATE, 'MMMM Y') + TextFormatting.NewLine +
   
       "Depth to water surface (ft): " +
       DefaultValue(f.RPE_WSE, 'no data') + TextFormatting.NewLine +
       
       "Depth below ground surface (ft): " +
       DefaultValue(f.GSE_WSE, 'no data') + TextFormatting.NewLine +
       
       "Water Surface Elevation (ft): " +
       DefaultValue(f.WSE, 'no data') + TextFormatting.NewLine +
       TextFormatting.NewLine
}

DefaultValue(popupString, 'No measurements to show')

Who will you invite to your Arcade family pop up party?

 

Challenges

Please use the comments section below to post answers to the following questions.

  1. How would you structure your expression to only show information from the last reading?

  2. How would you convert the measurements from feet to metres?

  3. Bonus round: How would you structure your code to show Quality Codes along with your Groundwater level readings?

 

Cheers! - Gee Fernando

If you are interested in joining the ArcGIS Online beta program, follow this link: ArcGIS Online Early Adopter Program 

 

Some of the new features coming to ArcGIS Online in the June 2020 update are:

 

  • A new home page editor to build a scrolling web page with an immersive image, your logo, descriptive text, and item galleries
  • Map Viewer Beta improvements
  • Instant configuration experience for Nearby, Minimalist, Zone Lookup and Attachment Viewer
  • Reports for administrators
  • Sub-layer item details pages

 

Note: The following blog describes the ArcGIS Online Early Adopter Community (EAC) and why you might benefit from participating in the beta: What is the ArcGIS Online EAC and why Join?

 

Let me know any questions or comments below and Julia Shi or myself can assist. 

I hope you have had a chance to explore the March ArcGIS Online Update. A feature that was not as heavily promoted but is still noteworthy is the ability to create a hosted table directly from My Content. This new feature is useful for whenever you want to create data in ArcGIS Online that doesn't have a spatial component. 

 

Create the non-spatial hosted table by browsing to Content > Create > Feature Layer > From Template > Build a Layer > Table. 

 

 

Once the table is created you can define the schema in the Data tab:

 

 

Finally, add data to the table using Update Data > Append Data to Layer. 

 

 

How do hosted tables fit in with your existing workflows? I hope you found this post helpful; let me know any questions or comments below!

I've had a longstanding need to visualize, query, and filter features using values from a related table, and came up with the following solution, which works great for my use case.

 

The use case involves managing stormwater catch basin inspection and cleaning (I've simplified the workflow for purposes of this post). The customer wanted field workers to be able to open Collector and quickly see basins that need attention or haven't been inspected/cleaned in over a year, and provide that same information in a dashboard. 

 

It's very easy to set up:

 

  1. Add fields to the feature layer to hold the attributes to bring over from the related table
  2. Grab the most recent record from the related table, and write values from that record over to the feature layer using the ArcGIS API for Python
  3. Put script on PythonAnywhere and set it to run every 60 seconds
  4. Configure web map symbology with a simple Arcade expression to show expired and failed inspections

 

Details on each step above:

 

  1. Self-explanatory. I named the fields "Status" and "LastCleaning".
  2. Wrote the script shown at the end of this post to grab records from the related table from the past day, sort them by time and drop duplicate records related to an asset (in case there were two inspection/cleaning records within the past 24 hours -- for example, a failed inspection on Wednesday afternoon was resolved on Thursday morning), then use a unique identifier ('FacilityID') to update the asset with data from the most recent inspection/cleaning. Shout out to Michael Duncan for help with the date query.
    from arcgis import GIS
    from arcgis.features import FeatureLayer
    import pandas as pd
    from arcgis.features import SpatialDataFrame
    from datetime import datetime, timedelta
    import time

    gis = GIS(f"https://someorg.maps.arcgis.com", 'someuser', 'somepass')

    def update_basins():
        one_day = datetime.today() - timedelta(days=1)
        string_day = one_day.strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S')
        where_query = f"DateInspected >= DATE '{string_day}'"

        catch_basins = gis.content.get('21343f6579b74cf212576e5614db8866')
        catch_basins_lyr = catch_basins.layers[0]
        catch_basins_sdf = SpatialDataFrame.from_layer(catch_basins_lyr)
        catch_basins_fset = catch_basins_lyr.query()
        catch_basins_features = catch_basins_fset.features

        cleanings_url = 'https://services9.arcgis.com/iERASXD4kaw1L6en/arcgis/rest/services/this_is_an_example/FeatureServer/1'
        cleanings_lyr = FeatureLayer(cleanings_url)
        cleanings_sdf = SpatialDataFrame.from_layer(cleanings_lyr)
        cleanings_fset = cleanings_lyr.query(where=where_query, out_fields='DateInspected, FacilityID, Status')
        cleanings_features = cleanings_fset.features

        df=cleanings_sdf.sort_values('DateInspected', ascending=False)
        df=df.drop_duplicates(subset="FacilityID")

        overlap_rows = pd.merge(left = catch_basins_sdf, right = df, how='inner', on = 'FacilityID')
        catch_basin_features = catch_basins_fset.features
        cleaning_updates = cleanings_fset.features
        cleaning_updates.reverse()

        def update(basins, cleanings):
            for FacilityID in overlap_rows['FacilityID']:
                try:
                    basin_feature = [f for f in catch_basin_features if f.attributes['FacilityID'] == FacilityID][0]
                    cleaning_feature = [f for f in cleanings_features if f.attributes['FacilityID'] == FacilityID][0]
                    basin_feature.attributes['LastCleaning'] = cleaning_feature.attributes['DateInspected']
                    basin_feature.attributes['Status'] = cleaning_feature.attributes['Status']
                    catch_basins_lyr.edit_features(updates=[basin_feature])
                    print(f"Updated {basin_feature.attributes['FacilityID']} status to {basin_feature.attributes['Status']}", flush=True)
                except:
                    continue

        update(catch_basins_features, cleaning_updates)

    while True:
        update_basins()
        time.sleep(60)

     

  3. Set up an "Always-On" task on PythonAnywhere to continually run the script. This is a very easy process. Just set up a PythonAnywhere account (the free tier would probably be fine for this application), upload your script file, and add the script on the Tasks tab as an Always-On Task. Now, the script writes the most recent inspection/cleaning record to the catch basins attribute table every 60 seconds:
  4. And lastly, just a simple Arcade expression to symbolize by the status of each basin (Current, Expired, or Needs Attention):
    var present = Now()
    var last_cleaning = $feature.LastCleaning
    var cleaning_age = DateDiff(present, last_cleaning, 'years');

    If (cleaning_age < 1 && $feature.Status == 'CleaningComplete') {
        return "Current"
    } else if ($feature.Status == 'NeedsAttention') {
        return "Needs Attention"
    } else if (cleaning_age > 1) {
        return "Expired"
    } else if (IsEmpty($feature.Status)) {
        return "Record missing or incomplete"
    }

 

I hope this is helpful to someone. Feel free to offer suggestions or ask questions. Hang in there everyone!

A Message from Blake Bilbo, Head of Customer Support

During these times, it’s absolutely critical for all GIS teams to make the best possible use of their time and available resources. Taking advantage of the right tools to ensure objectives and responsibilities are accomplished quickly is imperative. To any ArcGIS Online Administrators, or Administrators you may know: Please be aware that there is a FREE version of Admin Tools for ArcGIS Online on the ArcGIS Marketplace that we encourage everyone to take advantage of, if they are not already doing so.

To put this in perspective, many day-to-day administrative tasks will be streamlined and performed in bulk. Rapid access to items, users, and groups throughout an entire Organization via advanced filtering and sorting is supported. There is also the capability to add tags to users, as well as items and groups for important classification on-the-fly as situations develop, and emailing users in bulk ensures everyone in the Organization can be contacted with important information and updates as needed.

For very fluid environments and response, users can rapidly be invited to groups and items can be shared to those groups in bulk. Admin Tools also supports bulk updates to users’ roles as well as their Esri access. In situations where responsibilities and tasks may frequently shift from one user to another, item ownership can be quickly updated and changed. To protect an Organization’s items, delete protection can be turned on in bulk across all items.

Again, we ask that every ArcGIS Online Administrator be taking advantage of these free tools if they are not already doing so. I am also encouraging anyone coordinating with other ArcGIS Administrators and colleagues to share this message to ensure everyone has access to these tools. For any questions, please reach out to us at connect@geo-jobe.com.

Thank you, best wishes, stay healthy, and stay productive!

 

Most of us have not been through something like COVID-19 before. Many authorities and agencies have turned to ArcGIS Online applications to disseminate crucial COVID-19 related information and gain insight for how to respond. You might have come across the Johns Hopkins dashboard, or the web experience created by World Health Organization.

 

ArcGIS Online can be leveraged as a powerful tool for your organization and community in this difficult situation as well, and the picks for this week are intended to provide a firm foundation for getting started. They provide some newly updated best practices for preparing highly scalable ArcGIS Online web applications, comprehensive resources and crucial steps for mapping and understanding COVID-19, a brand new solution template for collecting and sharing information with the public related to the outbreak, and a living document that has collected and categorized COVID-19 dashboard examples, educational resources, questions, and solutions on GeoNet. 

 

Essential Configurations for Highly Scalable ArcGIS Online Web Applications

 

ArcGIS Online Product Manager Kelly Gerrow published this excellent, interactive blog post on the essential best practices for preparing layers and apps for very high demand. As Kelly writes, ArcGIS Online is built on scalable architecture that has supported millions of views per hour on the Johns Hopkins dashboard. The blog features a checklist where you can literally toggle off each setting for your layers and apps as they are configured, ensuring that you tap into the technology that has facilitated this massive-scale information sharing. As the title suggests, it is truly an essential read. 

 

Additional Resources:

 

 

The Tools to Get Started

 

Esri has been working to make resources available for mapping, analyzing, and understanding the spread of COVID-19, as well as gathering information from and sharing information with your community regarding the pandemic. On Esri's COVID-19 Hub Site, you can learn where to begin, access authoritative data and get updates from national agencies. If you want to create your own website to share information and resources with your community, this blog post is an ultra-comprehensive step-by-step guide for accomplishing this using ArcGIS Hub (as many government agencies have already done). And just yesterday, the ArcGIS Solutions team released Coronavirus Response | ArcGIS Solutions for Local Government - this features 10 applications specifically designed for use by the public and public health staff to "to understand the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) and share authoritative information about the pandemic with your community." 

 

Join the Conversation on GeoNet

 

Naturally, some of the conversation about the GIS response to COVID-19 has occurred on GeoNet. Leslie Fountain has curated a compelling, living document with links to data sources, dashboard examples, educational resources, and a collaborative spacewhere unanswered COVID-19 questions are highlighted. Taking a look at this space and seeing if you have experience with one of the questions may be a great way to help out a community from afar. 

 

I hope that the picks provided some guidance on the ways that GIS solutions can assist during these challenging days. Let me know in the comments below if they were helpful or if you have any additional questions. Keep an eye out for This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise & This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Pro. Thanks for reading - my sincere best wishes to you and yours. See you on Tuesday, 3/31.

 

-Peter

 

----------

 

Previous posts: This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online: Archive 

Connect with me on LinkedIn and follow me on Twitter

On the evening of March 31 (PDT), we plan to update ArcGIS Online.

 

 

New Tools Coming in Beta

  • ArcGIS Notebooks, Esri's integrated Jupyter notebook experience, will be available in beta with ArcGIS Online 8.1. ArcGIS Notebooks will allow you to combine the ArcGIS Python libraries with the larger open-source Python ecosystem for spatial data management, spatial analysis, and data science. 
  • Build simple, responsive applications with the beta version of Esri's popular minimalist Configurable App. Now it can use ArcGIS API for Javascript 4X, and you can include the new functionality from maps authored in Map Viewer beta.
  • A beta for the next version of ArcGIS Dashboards, built using ArcGIS API for Javascript 4x, will be available shortly after the March ArcGIS Online release. New enhancements include improved usability and performance, plus ArcGIS Arcade support for list and indicator elements.

 

HTTP Layer Notifications

ArcGIS Online is preparing to enforce HTTPS-only communication starting December 8, 2020. At the March release, organizations who have chosen not to utilize HTTPS for their web services will receive a notification informing them that adding layers and content via an HTTP URL will not work after December 8, 2020. For more information, read the blog.

 

Regional Subscriptions

ArcGIS Online is launching the capability to choose the region where your geospatial data is stored. With the March update of ArcGIS Online, customers will be able to select their data hosting region (United States or Europe) at the time of purchase. Subscriber and subscription information, item metadata, LBS services and processing (analytics, geocoding, routing, etc.), and back-office systems (subscriber management, credit accounting) will always remain in the US. Regional hosting will be for new subscriptions only.

 

Support for Social Logins with GitHub

Social logins can be an efficient way for organization members to create and manage access to an ArcGIS Online organization account. With the March update of ArcGIS Online, GitHub will be added as a supported social login. 

 

 

Please note that all planned updates are subject to change. A comprehensive list of implemented changes will be provided in our What's New email, blog, and documentation.

 

When an ArcGIS Online update is slated for the near future, I tend to reflect on functionality that has been recently added to the platform. With an update planned for later in March (see this post to participate in the Beta), I realized that there have been a couple of key updates to vector tile layers within the last year. In case you are new to ArcGIS Online within the last couple of months or weren't using vector tiles when the updates went out, the picks for this week showcase some of my go-to vector tile layer resources. I hope you enjoy!

 

Vector Tile Layer Style Editor (Native in Map Viewer)

 

This feature was released in June 2019. Without leaving the Map Viewer, create and save your very own custom style. Zara Matheson's excellent blog will walk you through exactly how: Edit Vector Tiles in Style from Map Viewer 

 

Additional Resources:

 

 

Replace Vector Tile Layers

 

Replacing a vector tile layer with updated data, from the Graphic User Interface (GUI), with minimal downtime, came to ArcGIS Online in October 2019. Garima Tiwari's blog describes in a succinct fashion how to accomplish this: Update hosted vector tile layer content using Replace Layer 

 

Additional Resources:

 

 

Understand the Root Tile

 

When creating vector tile packages in local tiling schemes, it is important to understand the root tile. This Esri Support knowledge base article, written by senior analyst Adam Eversole, sums it up nicely then goes deeper: "If a tile cache were a pyramid, the root tile would be its peak. It is the tile that represents the largest area of the map and the lowest level of detail." This is required reading for those wanting to publish hosted vector tile layers in a local projection. 

 

Additional Resources:

 

 

I hope the above picks provided some guidance and inspiration for working with vector tile layers! Let me know in the comments below if there are any questions, comments, or if there is any content you want to see in the future. Don't forget to keep an eye out for installments of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise & This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Pro, coming later this week. Thanks for reading and see you again on 3/17. 

 

Cheers,

 

-Peter

 

--------------------

 

Previous posts: This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online: Archive 

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Static bus timetables (GTFS) are no match for real time bus information (GTFS-realtime). But that doesn't mean you have to settle for static visualisation techniques.

In this blog I will show how you can be a little creative and make your static timetables sing and move along with Arcade. And you'll be left wanting to sing: the wheels on the bus go round and round

Select a link below to view the web map associated with this GIF.

The GIF and web map show popups of upcoming buses and those just recently missed. This would come in handy for bus commuters to understand which services are available at any given date and time. We’ll learn how to create these popup displays from a GTFS feed. Followed by how to extend this solution to a mobile friendly app, where commuters could access this information on the go

More on GTFS

A GTFS feed is a collection of text files, each telling a story about transit information. For this example we'll use the GTFS feed for public buses in Canberra, Australia.

  • Click here to download the GTFS feed for Canberra.

  • Click here to view the GTFS specification for Canberra.

Data prep

Before you get started, click here to download an ArcGIS Pro project package with my model builder configurations, used to create these layers.

Build expressions (hosted table)

You may have noticed from the model used for the hosted table, I created an extra field arrivalSeconds to calculate the arrival_time of buses from hh:mm:ss string type to a number (seconds elapsed since start of day). This was done to accelerate the filter query (which we'll use later) to only return features relevant to the time of day. As you can imagine, it's a lot faster to query numbers compared to converting string types on the fly (especially with large datasets).

Convert arrival_time to number of seconds elapsed since start of day
//separate arrival hours, minutes and seconds into an array
var separateArrival = Split($feature["arrival_time"],":")

//To fix hour figures greater than 23
var fixedHours = When(separateArrival[0] >= 24, separateArrival[0] - 24, separateArrival[0])

//convert arrival_time from 'String' to 'Date' type
var arrivalTimeAware = Date(Year(Now()), Month(Now()), Day(Now()), fixedHours, separateArrival[1], separateArrival[2])

var startOfDayTime = Date(Year(Now()), Month(Now()), Day(Now()), 0, 0, 0)

//arrival_time to number of seconds elapsed since start of day
var arrivalSeconds = DateDiff(arrivalTimeAware, startOfDayTime, 'seconds')
return arrivalSeconds

Build expressions (web map)

The following expressions assume that you're already familiar with Arcade FeatureSets, and FeatureSetByPortalItem() released in Arcade 1.8. If you'd like to familiarise yourself with Featuresets refer to this excellent blog written by Paul Barker.

After you've added the bus stops feature layer to a web map, build the following expression to return information relevant to the upcoming buses in the next 60 minutes (3,600 seconds).

  • Here is a web map already built for your convenience .

Expression for upcoming buses in the next 60 minutes
//query features from hosted table - 'stopsTimesTripsRoutesCalendar' in ArcGIS Online
var portal = Portal("https://www.arcgis.com")
var gtfsTable = FeatureSetByPortalItem(portal,"38ee59b7d5bc4173ab8786bd58ae274a", 0)

var stopId = $feature["stop_id"]

var startOfDayTime = Date(Year(Now()), Month(Now()), Day(Now()), 0, 0, 0)
//seconds elapsed since start of day
var secondsElapsed = DateDiff(Now(), startOfDayTime, 'seconds')

//return curr_date as an integer in the format 'YYYYMMDD' #HowItShouldBe
var curr_date = Number(Text(Now(),'YMMDD'))

//filter statement (SQL) - access variables with @
//if you'd like to change the time interval, change '3600' seconds to something else in statement - 'arrivalSeconds <= (@secondsElapsed + 3600)'
var filterStatement = 'arrivalSeconds >= @secondsElapsed AND arrivalSeconds <= (@secondsElapsed + 3600) AND stop_id = @stopId AND @curr_date >= start_date AND @curr_date <= end_date'

//filter the gtfsTable by the filter statement
//order results by arrivalSeconds in ascending order
var filtered = OrderBy(Filter(gtfsTable, filterStatement),'arrivalSeconds ASC')

var popupResult = ''

var weekDays = ['sunday','monday','tuesday','wednesday','thursday','friday','saturday']
//This variable is used within the for loop to determine whether a bus is operational on a given weekDay (e.g. returns 1 if operational, 0 if not).
var currWeekdayOpr = weekDays[Weekday(Now())]

//Iterate over the filtered results to show desried fields in popup
for (var f in filtered){
   if (f[currWeekdayOpr] == 1){
       popupResult += Left(f.arrival_time, 5) + " - " + f.route_long_name +
       When(f.route_type == 712, Concatenate(" (",f.trip_headsign,")"), Concatenate(" (",f.route_short_name,")")) +
       When(f.wheelchair_accessible == 1 && f.bikes_allowed == 1, " - ",
       f.wheelchair_accessible == 1 && f.bikes_allowed == 0," - ",
       f.wheelchair_accessible == 0 && f.bikes_allowed == 1," - ","") + TextFormatting.NewLine + TextFormatting.NewLine
   } else{
       popupResult += ""
   }
}

IIF(IsEmpty(popupResult), "No upcoming buses in the next hour" + TextFormatting.NewLine + TextFormatting.NewLine, popupResult)

You can also use a similar expression with a slightly modified filterStatement to query buses departed in the last x minutes. The statement below queries buses departed in the last 20 minutes (1,200 seconds).

var filterStatement = 'arrivalSeconds >= (@secondsElapsed - 1200) AND arrivalSeconds < @secondsElapsed AND stop_id = @stopId AND @curr_date >= start_date AND @curr_date <= end_date'
Complete expression for buses departed in the last 20 minutes
//query features from hosted table - 'stopsTimesTripsRoutesCalendar' in ArcGIS Online
var portal = Portal("https://www.arcgis.com")
var gtfsTable = FeatureSetByPortalItem(portal,"38ee59b7d5bc4173ab8786bd58ae274a", 0)

var stopId = $feature["stop_id"]

var startOfDayTime = Date(Year(Now()), Month(Now()), Day(Now()), 0, 0, 0)
//seconds elapsed since start of day
var secondsElapsed = DateDiff(Now(), startOfDayTime, 'seconds')

//return curr_date as an integer in the format 'YYYYMMDD' #HowItShouldBe
var curr_date = Number(Text(Now(),'YMMDD'))

//filter statement (SQL) - access variables with @
//if you'd like to change the time interval, change '1200' seconds to something else in statement - 'arrivalSeconds >= (@secondsElapsed - 1200)'
var filterStatement = 'arrivalSeconds >= (@secondsElapsed - 1200) AND arrivalSeconds < @secondsElapsed AND stop_id = @stopId AND @curr_date >= start_date AND @curr_date <= end_date'

//filter the gtfsTable by the filter statement
//order results by arrivalSeconds in ascending order
var filtered = OrderBy(Filter(gtfsTable, filterStatement),'arrivalSeconds ASC')

var popupResult = ''

var weekDays = ['sunday','monday','tuesday','wednesday','thursday','friday','saturday']
//This variable is used within the for loop to determine whether a bus is operational on a given weekDay (e.g. returns 1 if operational, 0 if not).
var currWeekdayOpr = weekDays[Weekday(Now())]

//Iterate over the filtered results to show desried fields in popup
for (var f in filtered){
   if (f[currWeekdayOpr] == 1){
       popupResult += Left(f.arrival_time, 5) + " - " + f.route_long_name +
       When(f.route_type == 712, Concatenate(" (",f.trip_headsign,")"), Concatenate(" (",f.route_short_name,")")) +
       When(f.wheelchair_accessible == 1 && f.bikes_allowed == 1, " - ",
       f.wheelchair_accessible == 1 && f.bikes_allowed == 0," - ",
       f.wheelchair_accessible == 0 && f.bikes_allowed == 1," - ","") + TextFormatting.NewLine + TextFormatting.NewLine
   } else{
       popupResult += ""
   }
}

return popupResult

Final thoughts

Once you’ve built the pop-ups to your heart's content, you can further highlight them by using configurable app templates. Click here to see how I’ve extended the above web map using the NearBy configurable app where users can search for bus stops by stop numbers, stop names or addresses.

Gotchas - FeatureSetByPortalItem() function is a great way to pull in data from another layer without needing to add that layer to your map. But make sure that the same sharing privileges are shared across the layer in the map and the layer you're pulling data from.

Learn more - if you like what you see, check out these carefully crafted Arcade resources by esri staff members. And if you do happen to be visiting this year's Developer Summit keep an eye out for Arcade tech sessions presented by Lisa Berry and Paul Barker.

Finally, stay tuned to Part 2 - where we'll take this solution "all the way to town"

 

Cheers! - Gee Fernando

The 2020 Esri Developer Summit (March 10-13 in Palm Springs) is almost here and there are a lot of ArcGIS Online sessions in store. Though all will be great, some recommended ones are listed below:

 

 

The full list of ArcGIS Online sessions can be found here. Don't forget to stop by the ArcGIS Online Product Island, too!

 

If you would like to join the ArcGIS Online beta program, follow this link: ArcGIS Online Early Adopter Program

 

Some of the new features coming to ArcGIS Online in the March 2020 Update include:

 

  • Next generation builder for ArcGIS Online's Configurable Applications
  • New support for Social Logins with GitHub
  • Embed Videos in Item Details
  • Improved Group Sharing

 

Note: The following blog describes the ArcGIS Online Early Adopter Community (EAC) and why you might benefit from participating in the beta: What is ArcGIS Online EAC and Why Join? 

 

If you have any questions, don't hesitate to comment below and Julia Shi or myself can assist. 

 

As an ArcGIS Online administrator, you have control over just about every aspect of your ArcGIS Online organization. From inviting members, assigning licenses and managing groups to configuring credits, security settings and utility services, you the ArcGIS Online admin are in charge. An incredible benefit of this is that the organization can be configured and managed with specific use case or workflow requirements in mind. A challenge is that there can be a lot to keep track of, and for new admins, a bit of a learning curve. The below picks provide some tips and tricks for new and seasoned admins alike to make the most of your, dare I say almighty, role as ArcGIS Online administrator.

 

How to Be an ArcGIS Online Administrator

 

If you are just getting started with administration, my colleague Rachel Guttmacher's blog post, How to be an ArcGIS Online Administrator, is a must-read. It's a fun, conversational piece that covers some of the most crucial administration components including credits, member management, licensing, and security. 

 

Additional Resources:

 

 

Utilize Custom Administrative Roles to the Fullest

 

Another colleague of mine, Tyler Burns, recently wrote a great blog post on taking advantage of custom administrative roles: Lighten the Administrative Load in ArcGIS Online with Custom Roles. If you're looking to delegate specific administrative tasks such as managing members and content or organizing the website, the post provides directions and screenshots for exactly how to configure custom administrative roles to accomplish this. 

 

Additional Resources:

 

 

"AAA": ArcGIS Online Administration Automation - Video 

 

Kelly Gerrow and John Yaist presented this 20 minute talk on automating administration at the 2019 Dev Summit. For anyone administering a larger organization or with an interest in bolstering their automation skills, this is a recommended view. Topics covered are using the Rest API to query the organization history, and creating groups, users, and assigning licenses in batch with the ArcGIS API for Python. 

 

Additional Resources:

 

 

I hope the above picks were helpful for all the administrators out there! Let me know below any comments, questions, or if there are any topics you want to see in future posts. Thanks for reading, and be sure to keep an eye out for This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise & This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Pro!

 

See you again in March,

 

-Peter

 

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Previous posts: This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online: Archive 

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