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(86 Posts)
HeatherSmith
Esri Contributor

Three videos about choosing colors in cartography.

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HeatherSmith
Esri Contributor

Two short videos about how to use color more effectively in map design.

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SilpaGadi
Esri Contributor

New ArcGIS tutorials
 
ArcGIS tutorial is a step-by-step workflow that uses a real-world scenario to introduce key ArcGIS tools, products and modern best practices. Here's a roundup of new tutorials in the ArcGIS tutorial Gallery that have appeared in the last month.
 
Symbolize by size 

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An affordable housing advocacy group is studying vacant housing in the United States. To support this effort, you'll map vacant housing units to show potential housing supply. This map will be one of several included in an internal report to help your group decide on their priorities and plans.

In this tutorial, you'll use symbols of different sizes to map the count of vacant housing units in each county. You'll experiment with and learn about the different possibilities for symbolizing with size in ArcGIS Map Viewer. This tutorial will help you make better choices when using symbol size in your own maps.

 

Generate DSMs and True Orthos with ArcGIS Reality for ArcGIS Pro 

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In this scenario, the City of San Francisco is expanding its GIS open data program to include high-resolution digital surface models (DSM) and True Ortho imagery. These new 2D products will be used to enhance citizen engagement through access to accurate and current high-quality imagery and other GIS data products. As an image analyst working for the city, you have been tasked with processing some newly acquired aerial imagery to generate these products.

You will do that using ArcGIS Reality for ArcGIS Pro. You'll download the input data and create a workspace to manage it. You'll then improve the image alignment using tie points, ground control points, and other photogrammetric processes. Finally, you'll generate a high-resolution DSM and a True Ortho. While this workflow is demonstrated on a small extent for brevity, ArcGIS Reality for ArcGIS Pro is routinely used to process much larger extents, as seen in this layer example hosted online.

 

Edit a building layer 

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Building information models (BIM) in ArcGIS provide a detailed representation of buildings and other construction elements, presented within rich 3D backdrop scenes. They can also be enabled for editing and be used to maintain up-to-date information about the real-life objects they represent.

In this tutorial, as the real estate manager working on the De Zalmhaven tower project in Rotterdam, Netherlands, you need to keep real estate agents and project stakeholders up to date on the status of the units available for sale or lease in the tower. You will create a 3D scene in which the building appears as an editable scene layer. You will edit attributes about unit availability in ArcGIS Pro, and you will share your latest updates with the real estate agents and project stakeholders as a web scene on your ArcGIS Enterprise portal.

 

Detect ships with SAR imagery 

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In this tutorial, as an analyst for the Panama Traffic Services agency, you will help determine ship congestion by detecting ships in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery and you’ll use the result to generate a vessel density map. A vessel density map shows the distribution of ships (that is, maritime traffic), based on the number of ships per unit area. SAR satellite sensors send and receive back microwaves to create high-resolution images of the Earth's surface. Unlike traditional methods such as the Automatic Identification System (AIS), which relies on broadcast systems aboard ships, SAR can help detect ships even in areas where AIS data may not be available or reliable. Understanding port congestion by incorporating a SAR-based approach can improve maritime traffic safety and efficiency.

Use network diagrams for quality assurance 

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In this tutorial, you will act as a GIS analyst for an electrical utility. In response to several user reports, the department is performing quality assurance checks on its network data. The GIS at a utility company is used by different departments for asset management, engineering analysis, and planning purposes. Supporting a modern utility requires maintaining a high standard of data quality. GIS is no longer only about making good-looking maps; it's about modeling the relationships and connectivity of all the assets maintained by the utility company so they can be leveraged by other systems and users. Quality assurance and quality control (QAQC) is an important part of maintaining any dataset, and as datasets grow larger and get more complicated, it is even more important to have robust tools that help to visualize and analyze the data in intuitive ways. You will use ArcGIS Pro tools, ArcGIS Utility Network, and network diagrams to explore associations between features and correct them if necessary. While the data and terminology presented in this tutorial are specific to the electric industry, the tools and processes translate to the data and workflows used by other industries, such as water or gas utilities.

Create 2D products with ArcGIS Drone2Map 

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You are a drone operator who has just finished capturing data for a residential construction site by collecting aerial images. Your manager would like you to take these raw drone images and use them to calculate the volume of stockpile on site.

In this tutorial, you'll use ArcGIS Drone2Map to convert your raw drone imagery into a highly accurate True Ortho using ground control points and perform the required measurement. Additionally, you'll publish your imagery products to the web so they can be made accessible to others at your organization.

New ArcGIS tutorial series

A tutorial series delivers multiple onboarding resources in a single-page experience. Here's a roundup of some new series in the ArcGIS tutorial Gallery that have appeared in the last month. 

Design a layout in ArcGIS Pro 

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A layout includes a map, along with surrounding information such as a title, legend, scale bar, or credit text. These elements—called map surrounds—help to explain the map. It is important that the layout be well designed so the map is easy to interpret. It should be balanced, consistent, uncluttered, and have a clear visual hierarchy.

You have been hired to create a printed map of a marine estuary for a small museum in South Australia. It should show the different land cover types and tidal class areas in the estuary, which are described in other displays in the museum. In this tutorial series, you'll use ArcGIS Pro to design a layout for the client.

 

 

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HeatherSmith
Esri Contributor

Watch this short video to learn how to choose color schemes that work well with light or dark basemaps.

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NikiWong
Esri Contributor

Announcing the release of the Community Mapping for Racial Equity and Social Justice tutorial collection, designed to equip young mappers with essential ArcGIS skills and focuses on mapping local communities through the lens of Racial Equity and Social Justice (RESJ) workflow.   

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SilpaGadi
Esri Contributor

New ArcGIS tutorials
 
ArcGIS tutorial is a step-by-step workflow that uses a real-world scenario to introduce key ArcGIS tools, products and modern best practices. Here's a roundup of new tutorials in the ArcGIS tutorial Gallery that have appeared in the last month.
 
Build a community asset map 

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The goal of community asset mapping is to gain a baseline understanding of the strengths and weaknesses in a neighborhood. An asset is anything that builds up a community, like a resource, such as schools and green space, or a strengthening characteristic like community cohesion and resilience. By taking stock of existing opportunities and areas of need, you can visualize and prioritize what and where solutions would best serve the community. This exercise is often used in youth participatory action projects in which youth are engaged in critically assessing their neighborhoods and come up with innovative solutions to meet the challenges they uncover.

 

Create a community walkability survey 

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A walkability assessment, or walk audit, is a well-documented community engagement tool to evaluate the built environment for pedestrian safety, accessibility, and ease of use. It is a widely used exercise that brings members of a community together—from different ages, abilities, and experiences—to take action to improve their community's walkability. These assessments involve going out in pairs or small groups and walking along a route in a neighborhood while making observations of the walking experience. The findings are gathered and assessed to determine the types of improvements needed and where they should be implemented to encourage walking.

A survey can help facilitate this activity, organize the responses, and allows you to visualize the results using charts and maps. It is important to find ways to share survey findings with participants so they are included in every step of the project.

Using ArcGIS Survey123 web designer, you will build an online survey to answer the project question—what encourages or discourages walking to local parks in my community? You will build a survey with a variety of question types, demonstrating both qualitative and quantitative data collection. One of the advantages of building questions and collecting data with Survey123 is the ability to visualize the survey results in a web map. The map is a compelling and interactive way for the community and other key stakeholders to engage with the findings.

 

Get started with ArcGIS Excalibur 

get-started-with-arcgis-excalibur-card.pngIn this tutorial, you will act first as a team lead and then as an imagery analyst working for the City of Toronto in Ontario, Canada. Your team has been tasked with helping the city inspect structural changes since 2007 around Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport. As the team lead, your job is to search for imagery of the airport and create an Excalibur project with an observation layer. As the imagery analyst, your job is to collect observations on any identified structural changes.

You will learn how to search for and connect to imagery in ArcGIS Excalibur, create a project, and create an observation layer. You will then conduct analysis to compare current and older imagery. You'll create observations and annotations on the map, and export the map to share your results with your organization.

 

Engage the community with a feedback survey 

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When working on a project related to racial equity and social justice, it is important to get and integrate the perspectives of the community that has been impacted by inequity in your project. Surveys are effective tools for better understanding community experiences, opinions, and perspectives from lived experiences. The scenario in this tutorial is around determining where to place a new park, but the workflow can be applied to many other interventions to meet a local community's priorities.

In this tutorial, you have determined a few areas in your community that would most benefit from a new park and green space in Baltimore, Maryland. Research shows that there continues to be inequity in the access and quality of green spaces by race, place, and income. You will incorporate an equity approach to engaging the community through this survey.

Tell the story of your equity plan 

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In this tutorial, you will use ArcGIS StoryMaps to build a story of your equity project to identify which areas in Baltimore would most benefit from a new park and green space. Historically underserved neighborhoods experience inequity in the access and quality of green spaces by race, place, and income. Parks and greenspace are valuable community spaces for people to find relief from extreme heat, increase likelihood of improved health outcomes, and build community.

 

 

Track and visualize equity goals 

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The third step in applying the Racial Equity and Social Justice workflow to GIS is to monitor the performance of equity goals. In this tutorial, you conducted a survey to find out which area participants want a new park in. You will compare the race and ethnicity of those who participated in a feedback survey to the makeup of the local community. Comparing this data will help you determine how well those who participated in your survey reflect the community where the new park will be built.

You will use analysis tools and create charts to visualize the race and ethnicity data and create a web app to share your findings with the community. As more survey entries are completed, the data will automatically update in both the map and app, increasing transparency and participation in the project.

 

Use map analysis tools to develop parks equitably 

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Previously, you have assessed the strengths and needs of your community. You now want to make an equity action plan to address a community need given what you have learned. In the Racial Equity and Social Justice workflow, after you have completed the map and analyze inequities step, the next step is to operationalize, or put into action, a solution to address the challenges you identified. The step is called the operationalize positive practices step. In this tutorial, you will determine which areas in the city would most benefit from a new park space, with consideration for areas that have historically experienced unequal access to benefits and opportunities for green space.

 

New ArcGIS tutorial series

A tutorial series delivers multiple onboarding resources in a single-page experience. Here's a roundup of some new series in the ArcGIS tutorial Gallery that have appeared in the last month. 

The power of interactive maps and apps 

the-power-of-interactive-maps-and-apps-card.pngExplore four examples of interactive maps and apps that demonstrate the cartographic benefits of modern GIS.

 

 

 

 

Map Venice in 2D and 3D 

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Learn how to create detailed maps and scenes of Venice, Italy, in ArcGIS Pro.

 

 

 

 

 
Map, analyze, and share fire incident data 

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Transform a spreadsheet of fire incident data into informative, analytical, and interactive online maps and apps

 

 

 

 

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HeatherSmith
Esri Contributor

Tips and techniques for designing maps with the Counts and Amounts (color) style in ArcGIS Map Viewer.

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HeatherSmith
Esri Contributor

To improve a map's legend, often all that’s needed is a bit of tidying: renaming, reordering, and removing items.

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HeatherSmith
Esri Contributor

Three short videos that explain visual hierarchy through examples in ArcGIS Online.

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SilpaGadi
Esri Contributor

New ArcGIS tutorials
 
ArcGIS tutorial is a step-by-step workflow that uses a real-world scenario to introduce key ArcGIS tools, products and modern best practices. Here's a roundup of new tutorials in the ArcGIS tutorial Gallery that have appeared in the last month.
 
Map and analyze the urban heat island effect 

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Heat islands are places that experience sustained elevated temperatures compared to surrounding areas, generally occurring in urban spaces with an abundance of impervious surfaces (such as sidewalks, rooftops, and buildings constructed using concrete, asphalt, and metal) and low tree canopy coverage. The dangerous conditions associated with urban heat islands, known as the urban heat island effect, contribute to higher rates of heat-related illnesses and deaths, compromising the health and quality of life of those living in affected communities.

Urban heat islands are also often associated with areas of historic under-investment, and they incur higher rates of energy consumption for cooling, contributing to accelerated resource consumption and emissions that worsen air quality.

In this scenario, you'll use feature and raster analysis tools to identify where the urban heat island effect impacts districts in Richmond, Virginia, and create a dashboard to monitor conditions throughout the city.

 

Get ready for deep learning in ArcGIS Pro 

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Deep learning is used by ArcGIS Pro tools to solve spatial problems, detect objects, and perform pixel classification. Using these tools requires that you have the correct deep learning libraries installed on your computer. In this tutorial, you will learn how to get ready for deep learning, setting up the libraries and checking that the installation was successful. Optionally, you will also learn how to verify your computer’s settings and troubleshoot common issues that might occur.

 

Get started with branch versioning 

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The National Renewable Energy Centre of Spain (CENER) wants to install solar panels on buildings in Madrid. First, they need to calculate the solar potential of each building. Buildings in a few neighborhoods have already been calculated, but it has proven to be a large project. To speed up the process going forward, multiple people will contribute to the project as data editors.

Versioning allows multiple people to edit the same data at the same time without applying locks or duplicating data. Each editor has an isolated view of the data and can merge their changes back into the default version. There are two types of versioning in ArcGIS: branch and traditional. Branch versioning facilitates multiuser editing through feature services and the Web GIS model.

This tutorial series describes the full branch versioning process for the Madrid solar project:

 

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