Upgrade to License Manager 10.5.1 to use Concurrent Use Licenses with ArcGIS Pro 2.0

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06-12-2017 10:56 AM
KoryKramer
Community Moderator
9 3 8,517

ArcGIS Pro provides the flexibility to license the application with either the default Named User model, or by converting licenses to Concurrent Use or Single Use.

Many organizations that are accustomed to using the concurrent use licensing model for ArcMap have extended that model to license ArcGIS Pro.  With a Concurrent Use license, your machine points to a License Manager Server for license authorization from a shared pool of licenses. You can choose the license level and extensions you want as long as the appropriate license is available. Concurrent Use licensing allows more users to have ArcGIS Pro installed on their machine than the total number of licenses. Simultaneous use of ArcGIS Pro is limited by the number of available licenses in the License Manager Server. Concurrent Use licensing is the same in ArcGIS Pro as it is in ArcMap.

As we approach the release of ArcGIS Pro 2.0, organizations using concurrent use licenses or Named User via Portal for ArcGIS will need to upgrade to License Manager 10.5.1 first, before upgrading to Pro 2.0.  For users who currently have a previous version of ArcGIS License Manager and wish to migrate to the latest 10.5.1 version of ArcGIS License Manager, follow the instructions below:

1. Download License Manager 10.5.1

      a. Log in to My Esri and go to My Organizations > Downloads.

My Organizations > Downloads

      b. In the Quick Search, type License Manager.

      c. ArcGIS License Manager 10.5.1 should be the only result.  Click View Downloads.

      d. Make sure to choose the product appropriate for your organization's platform (Windows or Linux). Click Download.

ArcGIS License Manager 10.5.1 Download button

2. Run the License Manager setup from your download

3. Follow the instructions to install the license manager to the desired location. At the end of the installation, ArcGIS License Server Administrator appears.

4. Complete the authorization process and start the license service. If you choose to do this step at a later time, on Windows, you can access License Server Administrator from Start > Programs > ArcGIS > License Manager > License Server Administrator. On Linux, you can run License Server Administrator from the installation location using the following command: <installation_path>/arcgis/license10.5/LSAdmin.

LM 10.5.1 Note

The bottom line?  Get your ArcGIS Pro licenses onto a 10.5.1 License Manager before upgrading to ArcGIS Pro 2.0 in order to have a seamless transition!

3 Comments
George_Thompson
Esri Frequent Contributor
CassandraFollett
New Contributor III

Hello, 

I work with an educational organization and the issue we have run into with trying to adopt ArcGIS Pro concurrent licensing, is that on each machine we have Active Directory accounts for many, many different students. When students boot up ArcGIS Pro, they are prompted to point to the server that our license manager is hosted on. Since regular student accounts do not / should not  have the administrative privilege to actually change these settings(If we compare this to ArcMap, pointing ArcMap to the license manager as an administrator is enough for this to be saved for all future users, but it seems the focus on named users/logging in to ArcMap Online accounts has changed this for ArcGIS Pro), it wastes a lot of my time completing this step for them. Not only that, but if they change computers the setting of the license manager isn't reflected on different machines. No amount of messing with registry settings has seemed to fix this. As you might imagine, this has slowed down the transition away from ArcMap completely; other instructors feel this is such a pain to deal with that they've shunned ArcGIS Pro completely. When trying to contact ESRI support, I've been advised to adopt single use licenses, but the whole point of concurrent licenses in our organization is for us to have the flexibility to offer GIS classes and instruction across the entire campus. And as mentioned, ArcMap concurrent licenses did not have an issue like this. Of course, the issue seems to just be pointing to the license manager for new users and having that setting reflect for new user profiles. It does not seem to me that there is a licensing issue here, only a technical one. 

I would like to see this addressed in ArcGIS Pro/license manager updates. If I install ArcGIS Pro and point it to the license manager, it should default to that for any other user accounts rather than prompting them to put in the information. If this has been addressed with the newest update, it would be great news. 

AmnoyAm
Esri Contributor

This feature exist in the current version of ArcGIS Pro. An administrator can do a silent install of ArcGIS Pro 1.4 and defining the following parameters for concurrent use licensing option:

SEAT_PREFERENCE
SOFTWARE_TYPE
ARCPRO_AUTH_TYPE
LICENSE_SERVER
SOFTWARE_CLASS_FN
LOCK_AUTH_SETTINGS

The LOCK_AUTH_SETTINGS registry key locks down ArCGIS Pro to the defined licensing option. All users will launch Pro using the predefined licensing option. A user will not be able to switch make any change to the licensing setting. Refer to the following link for more detail:

https://pro.arcgis.com/en/pro-app/get-started/arcgis-pro-installation-administration.htm#GUID-3BC344...

The following is an example of a silent install parameter for Pro per machine install.  It will set the License type to Concurrent Use and Advanced licensing level.  Because you've set the LOCK_AUTH_SETTINGS value to True, Pro will always launched with this predefined setting and lock the user from making licensing change. 

About the Author
With an undergraduate degree in Biology and Environmental Studies from Kalamazoo College, I became interested in GIS when working as a land stewardship manager on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. After returning from Costa Rica, I earned a graduate degree in GIS with a focus on Sustainability Management from the University of Washington. I’m a Customer Experience Lead focused on design and improvement of the product and support experience. When not working on ways to bring the customer voice and experience from the outside in, I like to find ways to move helpful information from the inside out.