Adding Labels Using Related Data

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10-13-2020 10:54 AM
JeffDavis7
Occasional Contributor

Hello,

I've tried to utilize the code I found posted by Richard Fairhurst that allows you to create labels based on data contained within a related table to no avail.  I keep getting the veritable "No features found. Could not verify expression".  Everyone's favorite error message.  BTW...a big shout out to Richard for posting this code and doing all he can to help others with this quest.

I am attempting to add the information contained under the Table field "Name" to individual polygons.

Any insight on what I am doing wrong would be most appreciated.

Thank you.

Jeff

Here is the logistics of my relationship class setup:

Origin Table: DBOPlotOccJoin

Primary Key: UserField4

Foreign Key: GIS_ID

Destination Table: BSACemeteriesCopy

Table Label Field: Name

Here is Richard's python code that I have augmented:

# Initialize a global dictionary for a related feature class/table

relateDict = {}

def FindLabel ( [UserField4] 😞

  # declare the dictionary global so it can be built once and used for all labels

  global relateDict

  # only populate the dictionary if it has no keys

  if len(relateDict) == 0:

    # Provide the path and table name to the relate feature class/table

    relateFC = r"R:\Jeff\City_Projects\Cemetery\CemeteryMgmt.gdb\DBOPlotOccJoin"

    # create a field list with the relate field first (POLYID),

    # followed by sort field(s) (SCHOOLID), then label field(s) (CROSS_STREET)

    relateFieldsList = ["GIS_ID", "Name"]   

# process a da search cursor to transfer the data to the dictionary

    with arcpy.da.SearchCursor(relateFC, relateFieldsList) as relateRows:

      for relateRow in relateRows:

        # store the key value in a variable so the relate value

        # is only read from the row once, improving speed

        relateKey = relateRow[0]

        # if the relate key of the current row isn't found

        # create the key and make it's value a list of a list of field values

        if not relateKey in relateDict:

          # [searchRow[1:]] is a list containing

          # a list of the field values after the key.

          relateDict[relateKey] = [relateRow[1:]]

        else:

          # if the relate key is already in the dictionary

          # append the next list of field values to the

          # existing list associated with the key

          relateDict[relateKey].append(relateRow[1:])

    # delete the cursor, and row to make sure all locks release

    del relateRows, relateRow

  # store the current label feature's relate key field value

  # so that it is only read once, improving speed

  labelKey = [UserField4]

  # start building a label expression.

  # My label has a bold key value header in a larger font

  expression = '<FNT name="Arial" size="12"><BOL>{}</BOL></FNT>'.format(labelKey)

  # determine if the label key is in the dictionary

  if labelKey in relateDict:

    # sort the list of the list of fields

    sortedList = sorted(relateDict[labelKey])

    # add a record count to the label header in bold regular font

    expression += '\n<FNT name="Arial" size="10"><BOL>School Count = {}</BOL></FNT>'.format(len(sortedList))

    # process the sorted list

    for fieldValues in sortedList:

       # append related data to the label expression

       expression += '\n{0} - {1} - {2} - {3}'.format(fieldValues[0], fieldValues[1], fieldValues[2], fieldValues[3])

    # clean up the list variables after completing the for loop

    del sortedList, fieldValues

  else:

    expression += '\n<FNT name="Arial" size="10"><BOL>School Count = 0</BOL></FNT>'

  # return the label expression to display

  return expression

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39 Replies
RandyBurton
MVP Alum

Did it print a message just before the error? It should have printed something like:  "Bad geometry for xxxx-x-xxx".  The  "AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'extent'" indicates the last feature processed had null or missing geometry.

There is a check geometry tool in the ArcToolbox (Data Management Tools > Features > Check Geometry).  Use "R:\Jeff\City_Projects\Cemetery\CemeteryMgmt.gdb\BSACemeteriesCopy" as the feature to check.  It should find the features with bad geometry.

JeffDavis7
Occasional Contributor

No.  There was no message of an error.

I checked the geometry and it appears I have 12 issues; 9 self intersections and 3 null geometry.

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JeffDavis7
Occasional Contributor

I do have a couple follow-up questions...I'd like to add additional field outputs beyond Cemetery, Plot and Name.

I've created two additional fields in DBOPlotOccJoin; one called Vettxt (text field featuring binary 0 or 1, Vet or not) and the other called OccLoc (featuring the entire Cemetery-Block-Lot-Plot as text).  I have tried a few things that seemed "logical" of where to place these to be added as output fields but they don't seem to come over after the code is run.  If I want them added along with Cemetery, Plot and Name, where should they go in the code?

Also, I would like to add BirthDate and DeathDate.  Do I need to convert them to text or just change string to date and modify the Born and Died call outs?

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RandyBurton
MVP Alum

Since these fields are in the DBOPlotOccJoin table, they would be added after the birth and death dates.  The Vettxt is type Boolean or Integer?  Is the OccLoc field a duplicate of the UserField4, or is it a bit different?

Regarding BirthDate and DeathDate fields, are they type date, or something custom?  Sometimes cemetery markers do not give a complete date, so I am curious if there are any rules for handling such dates.

I'll take a fresh look at the code and make some suggestions.

JeffDavis7
Occasional Contributor

That would be great, Randy.

The Vettxt is actually a text field. It was numeric as another field but I converted it to text.

The OccLoc field is text and is just a tidier version with better dashes.

The BirthDate and DeathDate fields are dates at present. It appears they had more luck recording the death dates than the birth dates. A few null values in the birth dates.

Thanks again,

Jeff

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JeffDavis7
Occasional Contributor

Here is the latest "original" code that I have from you if that helps.  I commented out the sections we discussed earlier but everything else is the same...minus the fields I have tried to add to no avail.

import arcpy # if not in python window
import os

# Prep work : set up some parameters
# feature with geometry - specifically polygons
fc = r"R:\Jeff\City_Projects\Cemetery\CemeteryMgmt.gdb\BSACemeteriesCopy"

# related table with data
relateFC = r"R:\Jeff\City_Projects\Cemetery\CemeteryMgmt.gdb\DBOPlotOccJoin"
relateFieldsList = ["UserField4", "Name"] # Born and Died are optional, others can be added

# new point feature we will create
outPath = r'R:\Jeff\City_Projects\Cemetery\CemeteryMgmt.gdb'
outName = 'AGO_cemetery'
outFields = ['SHAPE@X', 'SHAPE@Y', 'Cemetery', 'Plot', 'Name']

# full path to new feature
outFC = os.path.join(outPath, outName)

# Step 1 : create a new feature
# spatial reference for new feature
sr = arcpy.Describe(fc).SpatialReference # same spatial reference as source feature

# create the new feature
arcpy.CreateFeatureclass_management(out_path = outPath, out_name = outName, geometry_type = "POINT",
                                    template = "#", has_m = "DISABLED", has_z = "DISABLED",
                                    spatial_reference = sr)

# create fields (all text): Cemetery, Plot, Name, Born, Died
arcpy.AddField_management(in_table = outFC, field_name = 'Cemetery',
                          field_type = "STRING", field_precision = "#", field_scale = "#",
                          field_length = 50, field_alias = "Cemetery", field_is_nullable = "NULLABLE",
                          field_is_required = "NON_REQUIRED", field_domain = "#")
arcpy.AddField_management(in_table = outFC, field_name = 'Plot',
                          field_type = "STRING", field_precision = "#", field_scale = "#",
                          field_length = 50, field_alias = "Plot", field_is_nullable = "NULLABLE",
                          field_is_required = "NON_REQUIRED", field_domain = "#")
arcpy.AddField_management(in_table = outFC, field_name = 'Name',
                          field_type = "STRING", field_precision = "#", field_scale = "#",
                          field_length = 50, field_alias = "Name", field_is_nullable = "NULLABLE",
                          field_is_required = "NON_REQUIRED", field_domain = "#")
#arcpy.AddField_management(in_table = outFC, field_name = 'BirthDate',
                          #field_type = "STRING", field_precision = "#", field_scale = "#",
                          #field_length = 20, field_alias = "BirthDate", field_is_nullable = "NULLABLE",
                          #field_is_required = "NON_REQUIRED", field_domain = "#")
#arcpy.AddField_management(in_table = outFC, field_name = 'DeathDate',
                          #field_type = "STRING", field_precision = "#", field_scale = "#",
                          #field_length = 20, field_alias = "DeathDate", field_is_nullable = "NULLABLE",
                          #field_is_required = "NON_REQUIRED", field_domain = "#")


# Step 2 : build the related dictionary
relateDict = {}

# read the related table's data into a dictionary
# the key will be the first field in the relateFieldsList
# the value will be a list of tuples starting with the second field in the relatedFields list and using index [0] 
with arcpy.da.SearchCursor(relateFC, relateFieldsList) as relateRows:
    for relateRow in relateRows:
        relateKey = relateRow[0]
        if not relateKey in relateDict:
            relateDict[relateKey] = [relateRow[1:]]
        else:
            relateDict[relateKey].append(relateRow[1:])

del relateRows, relateRow # clean up


# Step 3 : populate the new feature
# ready an insert cursor and loop through source feature and dictionary
insertCursor = arcpy.da.InsertCursor(outFC, outFields)
with arcpy.da.SearchCursor(fc,['SHAPE@', 'Cemetery', 'GIS_ID']) as cursor:
    for row in cursor:
        labelKey = row[2] # the link
        if labelKey in relateDict:
            sortedList = sorted(relateDict[labelKey])
            listCount = len(sortedList)
            # calculate values for point geometry
            xstep = (row[0].extent.XMax - row[0].extent.XMin)/listCount
            ystep = (row[0].extent.YMax - row[0].extent.YMin)/listCount
            xmin = row[0].extent.XMin + (xstep/2) # x coord for first point
            ymin = row[0].extent.YMin + (ystep/2) # y coord for first point
            # final data
            for fieldValues in sortedList:
                name = fieldValues[0]
                # assuming the dates are type text/string and not type date
                # otherwise some conversion will be required
                #born = fieldValues[1]
                #died = fieldValues[2]
                # print(xmin, ymin, row[1], labelKey, name) # if printing, remove: born, died
                insertCursor.insertRow([xmin, ymin, row[1], labelKey, name])# remove: born, died
                xmin += xstep # add step to x coord
                ymin += ystep # add step to y coord
        else: # not in dictionary
            pass # substitute with error code if necessary 

del insertCursor

Also, I repaired the geometry issues and ran the above code and everything came through including our other cemetery.  It works great.  Thank you.

I've tried adding the additional fields that I mentioned in my previous inquiry but it refuses to carry them over.  Hopefully you will be able to once again enlighten me.  

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RandyBurton
MVP Alum

Here's some code to try:

import arcpy # if not in python window
import os

# set up variables
# feature with geometry - specifically polygons)
fc = r"R:\Jeff\City_Projects\Cemetery\CemeteryMgmt.gdb\BSACemeteriesCopy"

# related table with data
relateFC = r"R:\Jeff\City_Projects\Cemetery\CemeteryMgmt.gdb\DBOPlotOccJoin"
relateFieldsList = ["UserField4", "Name", "BirthDate", "DeathDate", "Vettxt", "OccLoc"] 

# new point feature we will create
outPath = r'C:\Users\Randy\Documents\ArcGIS\PythonScripts\fairhurst\fairhurst.gdb'
outName = 'AGO_cemetery'
outFields = ['SHAPE@X', 'SHAPE@Y', 'Cemetery', 'Plot', 'Name', 'BirthDate', 'DeathDate', 'Vettxt', 'OccLoc']

# full path to new feature
outFC = os.path.join(outPath, outName)

# Step 1 : create a new feature
# spatial reference for new feature
sr = arcpy.Describe(fc).SpatialReference # same spatial reference as source feature

# create the new feature
arcpy.CreateFeatureclass_management(out_path = outPath, out_name = outName, geometry_type = "POINT",
                                    template = "#", has_m = "DISABLED", has_z = "DISABLED",
                                    spatial_reference = sr)

# create fields: Cemetery, Plot, Name, BirthDate, DeathDate, Vettxt, OccLoc
# modify the size of text fields as required
arcpy.AddField_management(in_table = outFC, field_name = 'Cemetery',
                          field_type = "STRING", field_precision = "#", field_scale = "#",
                          field_length = 50, field_alias = "Cemetery", field_is_nullable = "NULLABLE",
                          field_is_required = "NON_REQUIRED", field_domain = "#")
arcpy.AddField_management(in_table = outFC, field_name = 'Plot',
                          field_type = "STRING", field_precision = "#", field_scale = "#",
                          field_length = 50, field_alias = "Plot", field_is_nullable = "NULLABLE",
                          field_is_required = "NON_REQUIRED", field_domain = "#")
arcpy.AddField_management(in_table = outFC, field_name = 'Name',
                          field_type = "STRING", field_precision = "#", field_scale = "#",
                          field_length = 50, field_alias = "Name", field_is_nullable = "NULLABLE",
                          field_is_required = "NON_REQUIRED", field_domain = "#")
arcpy.AddField_management(in_table = outFC, field_name = 'BirthDate',
                          field_type = "DATE", field_precision = "#", field_scale = "#",
                          field_length = "#", field_alias = "BirthDate", field_is_nullable = "NULLABLE",
                          field_is_required = "NON_REQUIRED", field_domain = "#")
arcpy.AddField_management(in_table = outFC, field_name = 'DeathDate',
                          field_type = "DATE", field_precision = "#", field_scale = "#",
                          field_length = "#", field_alias = "DeathDate", field_is_nullable = "NULLABLE",
                          field_is_required = "NON_REQUIRED", field_domain = "#")
arcpy.AddField_management(in_table = outFC, field_name = 'Vettxt',
                          field_type = "STRING", field_precision = "#", field_scale = "#",
                          field_length = 1, field_alias = "Vettxt", field_is_nullable = "NULLABLE",
                          field_is_required = "NON_REQUIRED", field_domain = "#")
arcpy.AddField_management(in_table = outFC, field_name = 'OccLoc',
                          field_type = "STRING", field_precision = "#", field_scale = "#",
                          field_length = 50, field_alias = "OccLoc", field_is_nullable = "NULLABLE",
                          field_is_required = "NON_REQUIRED", field_domain = "#")


# Step 2 : build the related dictionary
relateDict = {}

# read the related table's data into a dictionary
# the key will be the first field in the relateFieldsList
# the value will be a list of tuples starting with the second field in the relatedFields list and using index [0] 
with arcpy.da.SearchCursor(relateFC, relateFieldsList) as relateRows:
    for relateRow in relateRows:
        relateKey = relateRow[0]
        if not relateKey in relateDict:
            relateDict[relateKey] = [relateRow[1:]]
        else:
            relateDict[relateKey].append(relateRow[1:])

del relateRows, relateRow # clean up


# Step 3 : populate the new feature
# ready an insert cursor and loop through source feature and dictionary
insertCursor = arcpy.da.InsertCursor(outFC, outFields)
with arcpy.da.SearchCursor(fc,['SHAPE@', 'Cemetery', 'GIS_ID']) as cursor:
    for row in cursor:
        labelKey = row[2] # the link
        cemetery = row[1] # cemetery name
        if labelKey in relateDict:
            sortedList = sorted(relateDict[labelKey])
            listCount = len(sortedList)
            # calculate values for point geometry
            xstep = (row[0].extent.XMax - row[0].extent.XMin)/listCount
            ystep = (row[0].extent.YMax - row[0].extent.YMin)/listCount
            xmin = row[0].extent.XMin + (xstep/2) # x coord for first point
            ymin = row[0].extent.YMin + (ystep/2) # y coord for first point
            # final data
            for fieldValues in sortedList:
                # field values from related table : add additional processing if necessary
                name = fieldValues[0]
                born = fieldValues[1]
                died = fieldValues[2]
                vet = fieldValues[3]
                occloc =  fieldValues[4]
                # print(xmin, ymin, cemetery, labelKey, name, born, died, vet, occloc)
                insertCursor.insertRow([xmin, ymin, cemetery, labelKey, name, born, died, vet, occloc])
                xmin += xstep # add step to x coord
                ymin += ystep # add step to y coord

        else: # not in dictionary
            pass # substitute with error code if necessary 

del insertCursor‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍

In line 10 and line 15, the birth/death, veteran, and location fields have been added to the list of field names.

In Step 1 (lines 20-58), additions have been made to the fields for the output feature.  Suggestions to think about, after testing the code:  Since this is going to AGO, you may wish to rename the fields to something that may make more sense to the user - or at least change the alias to something more meaningful.  If you rename fields you will need to make the appropriate changes to lines 10 an 15.  The Vettxt being a 1 or 0 may not make sense to the end user. A true/false a Y/N may make more sense.

Lines 96-102 have been modified to include the new fields.  Other than that, I think the remaining code is mostly the same.  Hope this helps.

JeffDavis7
Occasional Contributor

Hi Randy,

Thank you again for your assistance.  I ran the above code and received the following error message:

Executing: OccupantPtsEnhanced

Start Time: Thu Oct 29 06:38:15 2020

Running script OccupantPtsEnhanced...

Failed script OccupantPtsEnhanced...

 

Traceback (most recent call last):

  File "R:\Jeff\City_Projects\Cemetery\OccupantPtsEnhanced.py", line 86, in <module>

    sortedList = sorted(relateDict[labelKey])

TypeError: can't compare datetime.datetime to NoneType

 

Failed to execute (OccupantPtsEnhanced).

Failed at Thu Oct 29 06:38:21 2020 (Elapsed Time: 5.61 seconds)

Hopefully this will make some sense to you.

Thanks.

Jeff

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RandyBurton
MVP Alum

The sorted function is trying to sort  the relateDict by all fields. Since some of the dates are null values, the function can't determine which should come first.   You can either leave it unsorted or sort it only by the first element which is the name.

# Replace the line:
sortedList = sorted(relateDict[labelKey])

# With this to leave unsorted:
sortedList = relateDict[labelKey]

# Or with this to sort only by first element (name) by using the key parameter:
sortedList = sorted(relateDict[labelKey], key=lambda x: x[0])‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍

I would suggest  leaving unsorted for now; use line 5.

JeffDavis7
Occasional Contributor

That worked perfectly, Randy.  I attached a screen capture to show you how the points appear after the code is executed.  They are all more or less inside the polygons.  I can go around to each polygon and relocate those points that fell outside their respective boundary.

Thank you again for all your hard work!  I really appreciate your assistance and this will go along way to helping us better manage our cemetery plots.  With Veterans Day coming up it couldn't have come at a better time.

Jeff

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