What does the ST stand for in ST_Geometry, etc

911
3
Jump to solution
06-28-2018 04:04 PM
Highlighted
MVP Regular Contributor

We are using ST_Geometry in oracle... But we may have to import a large number of features from a SDO_Geometry oracle system that has been used with Autodesk software. I was wondering:

1. What the ST and SDO stand for?

  •       ST = storage type, spatial type?   
  •       SDO = spatial data object?

2. Suggested workflow for the conversion?

  • Dump data with Autodesk dwg or shapefile and consume with esri?
  • Is there a way to pull the data into ST_Geometry from SDO_Geometry at a database level?

Thanks!

Reply
0 Kudos
1 Solution

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
MVP Esteemed Contributor

The best explanation I have ever seen, which is probably as accurate as anyone could come up with, comes from:

Stolze, K. (2003, February). SQL/MM Spatial-The Standard to Manage Spatial Data in a Relational Database System. In BTW (Vol. 2003, pp. 247-264).

The SQL/MM standard uses consistently the prefix ST for all tables, views, types, methods, and function names. The prefix stood originally for Spatial and Temporal. It was intended in the early stages of the standard development to define a combination of temporal and spatial extension. A reason for that was that spatial information is very often tied with temporal data [SWCD98, SWCD97, RA01, TJS97]. During the development of SQL/MM Spatial, it was decided that temporal has a broader scope beyond the spatial application and should be a part of the SQL standard [ISO99] as SQL/Temporal [ISO01]. The contributors to SQL/MM did not want to move forward with a Spatio-temporal support until SQL/Temporal developed.  In the mean time, the focus of spatial standard lied on keeping it aligned with the OGC specification and the standards developed by the technical committee ISO/TC 211, for example [ISO02a, ISO02b]. The prefix ST for the spatial tables, types, and methods was not changed during the organizational changes of the standards, however. Today, one might want to interpret it as Spatial Type.

View solution in original post

3 Replies
Highlighted
MVP Esteemed Contributor

Create Spatial Type—Help | ArcGIS Desktop 

The Create Spatial Type tool adds the ST_Geometry SQL type, subtypes, and functions to an Oracle or PostgreSQL database. This allows you to use the ST_Geometry SQL type to store geometries in a database that does not contain a geodatabase. You can also use this tool to upgrade the existing ST_Geometry type, subtypes, and functions in an Oracle or PostgreSQL database.

would be my guess

or you could browse through non-esri docs

Spatial Data Types Overview | Microsoft Docs 

Highlighted
MVP Esteemed Contributor

The best explanation I have ever seen, which is probably as accurate as anyone could come up with, comes from:

Stolze, K. (2003, February). SQL/MM Spatial-The Standard to Manage Spatial Data in a Relational Database System. In BTW (Vol. 2003, pp. 247-264).

The SQL/MM standard uses consistently the prefix ST for all tables, views, types, methods, and function names. The prefix stood originally for Spatial and Temporal. It was intended in the early stages of the standard development to define a combination of temporal and spatial extension. A reason for that was that spatial information is very often tied with temporal data [SWCD98, SWCD97, RA01, TJS97]. During the development of SQL/MM Spatial, it was decided that temporal has a broader scope beyond the spatial application and should be a part of the SQL standard [ISO99] as SQL/Temporal [ISO01]. The contributors to SQL/MM did not want to move forward with a Spatio-temporal support until SQL/Temporal developed.  In the mean time, the focus of spatial standard lied on keeping it aligned with the OGC specification and the standards developed by the technical committee ISO/TC 211, for example [ISO02a, ISO02b]. The prefix ST for the spatial tables, types, and methods was not changed during the organizational changes of the standards, however. Today, one might want to interpret it as Spatial Type.

View solution in original post

Highlighted
MVP Regular Contributor

Thanks!

Reply
0 Kudos