ArcGIS Pro: Essential Workflows Class Resources

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05-16-2016 11:54 AM
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ArcGIS Pro: Essential Workflows Class Resources

This three-day course is about GIS workflows; i.e. best practices for using GIS tools and techniques to complete your GIS tasks.  Students will learn the essential workflows for creating, managing, visualizing, editing, analyzing, and sharing GIS data and maps using ArcGIS Pro.  The resources below are organized in two sections.  The first section introduces ArcGIS Pro, its capabilities, and its functionality.  The second section contains a lesson-by-lesson breakdown of class resources, focusing on topics such as: navigating the ArcGIS Pro interface, data management/organization, coordinate systems, layer properties in ArcGIS Pro (symbology, labeling, visualization), working with tables, displaying 3D GIS data in Pro, editing and analysis of GIS data, creation of print and web maps, and various strategies for sharing GIS data, maps, and other content with ArcGIS Pro.

A) Introduction / Background / Overview of Capabilities

B) Course Lesson Resources

Lesson 1: Getting started with ArcGIS Pro

Lesson 2: Creating geodatabase data

Lesson 3: Spatial reference and coordinate systems

Lesson 4: Using ModelBuilder for data conversion

Lesson 5: Visualizing data in ArcGIS Pro

Lesson 6: Adding text to the map

  

Lesson 7: Visualizing data in 3D

Lesson 8: Creating features from tabular data

Lesson 9: Relating tabular data

Lesson 10: Creating new features in ArcGIS Pro

Lesson 11: Modifying existing features

Lesson 12: Using ModelBuilder for analysis

Lesson 13: Sharing a static map

Lesson 14: Sharing dynamic maps

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Nicholas,

Thank you for laying out this workflow guide, which I'm looking forward to completing later this week. In the meantime, I need to digitize several years of handwritten field data for use in ArcGIS. Should we first create tables in Excel or something similar, put the data directly into an ArcGIS sheet or is there a third option that would allow the most flexibility for successfully using the data on a variety of platforms?

Thanks,

Pat

Hi Pat,

When you say "digitize handwritten field data", are you referring to something like field data sheets that need to be entered into spreadsheets? If yes, I would recommend entering your information in MS Excel.  Excel documents (and derivatives such as CSV files) will work in many components of the ArcGIS Platform, including Pro, ArcMap, and ArcGIS Online.  In your situation, I would recommend entering your data in Excel, which you can use across the ArcGIS Platform, as well as many other statistical/analytical software packages.

hope this helps,

Nick

See link below for working with Excel data in Pro.

Work with Microsoft Excel files in ArcGIS Pro—Excel | ArcGIS for Desktop

Hi Pat,

When you say "digitize handwritten field data", are you referring to something like field data sheets that need to be entered into spreadsheets? If yes, I would recommend entering your information in MS Excel. Excel documents (and derivatives such as CSV files) will work in many components of the ArcGIS Platform, including Pro, ArcMap, and ArcGIS Online. In your situation, I would recommend entering your data in Excel, which you can use across the ArcGIS Platform, as well as many other statistical/analytical software packages.

hope this helps,

Nick

See link below for working with Excel data in Pro.

Work with Microsoft Excel files in ArcGIS Pro—Excel | ArcGIS for Desktop<http://pro.arcgis.com/en/pro-app/help/data/excel/work-with-excel-in-arcgis-pro.htm>

Nicholas M. Giner, PhD | Instructor, CTT+

Esri – Washington DC | 8615 Westwood Center Drive | Vienna, VA 22182-2218

T: 703-506-9515 x5794 | nginer@esri.com<mailto:nginer@esri.com> | esri.com

Esri Certified

ArcGIS Desktop Professional

Hi Nick,

I'm sorry for the delay in getting back to you and thanks for replying. Yes, you're right, the handwritten field data are data sheets that we want to finally put into a digital datasheet format. I'm surprised but happy to hear that MS Excel will do (I'd read some posts a while back lamenting that Excel files didn't interface well with ArcGIS). Yes, it's a huge help and thanks again for taking the time to get back to me. Finally, thank you for the links to the Arc training module online, which I'll start working through next weekend.

Best of luck with your work, and best wishes,

Pat

Nicholas... lots on modelbuilder, but is anything coming on using the scipy stack in work?

Hi Nick,

If you have a minute, I have 2 more quick questions about the Excel docs:

1. I've read on an ArcGIS forum that we should always avoid empty cells, placing a zero or recognized placeholder number value (e.g., 99, in the case of our data) instead. Is this what you'd recommend as well?

2. We have data from a variety of different sampling areas which were inaugurated at different dates over a 2-year period. Would you suggest that the data from each sampling area be in its own Excel doc (workbook), or be in its own worksheet inside a single document?

I appreciate any advice you've got on these two issues, and thank you again for your help.

Best,

Pat

Hi Dan – thanks for your question. I am not a Python expert (and have not worked directly with scipy in Pro recently), but I did find out some information for you. The first link points to “What’s new in ArcGIS Pro 1.1” (we are currently on version 1.2).

https://pro.arcgis.com/en/pro-app/get-started/whats-new-in-arcgis-pro-1-1.htm#ESRI_SECTION1_75148D0B50BA4C73B453504D277FD573

The following screen shots show where this package is located on my C: drive, as per my installation of ArcGIS Pro.

Hope this helps. If you have additional questions, let me know and I can forward them to the appropriate person.

Thanks,

Nick

Hi Nick,

I think you may have meant for this message to go to another recipient. I was asking you a followup about Excel workbooks v. Excel worksheets for multiple sampling stations.

Thanks!

Pat

Hi Pat – sorry again for the delay. Crazy week. Here are some thoughts on your email. When you have empty cells in a spreadsheet, and bring that spreadsheet into ArcMap, those empty cells become “null” values. I would recommend replacing them with something.

1) For numeric data, I’d recommend replacing “null” values with zeros. The reason why has to do with calculations. For example, when I use Field Calculator to add the fields below, my SUM field has a “null” value because Fields 1 and 4 contain “null” values (first picture). If I replace those “nulls” with zeros, then summing those fields produces a desired numeric value (second picture).

You can replace “nulls” with zeroes (or any value) in ArcGIS using Select by Attribute, choosing the field that contains the “nulls” and using the IS NULL operation and value. This will select rows that contain “null” values, then you can use field calculator to replace those cells with whatever value you choose.

If you decide to replace empty cells with zero or whatever in Excel, I’d suggest using the “Go to Special” functionality in Excel. The steps for doing this can be seen at the link below.

https://www.extendoffice.com/documents/excel/772-excel-fill-blank-cells-with-0-or-specific-value.html#a1

2) Your second point, it’s up to you. I really have no recommendations. You can have individual worksheets for each dataset, or have multiple sheets within a workbook. ArcMap works fine either way. The spreadsheet below has 2 sheets. On the left you have the 2 sheets in Excel, on the right you have the same two sheets as they appear in ArcGIS Pro. Both of which can be dragged into Pro.

One thing to think about in the future. If you decide to convert your spreadsheets into CSV files, you will lose the multi-sheet functionality, as CSV files don’t accept multiple sheets.

Hope this helps,

Nick

Hi Nick,

Please don't apologize for any delay! Your answers are a tremendous help to us, and I appreciate your time and your help. Replacing nulls with zeroes via Go To Special sounds easy enough and the reason makes complete sense. Unfortunately none of the pictures came through on this end, but I think I understand your points from your explanations, so we should be ready for the next step.

Best,

Pat

Wondering about the handwritten notes...have you heard of google ‘sheets’. Very similar to excel only free with your gmail account. You can even export as xlsx. Or a few other types. 

I really like google drive because you get 10gb free with gmail and with sheets you can be mobile and collect your data in the field. Just a thought.

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