Creating an SDE instance / service in 10.1

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12-26-2013 06:24 AM
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Regular Contributor
I just installed ArcSDE 10.1 at my workplace for the first time in a Microsoft SQL Server 2012 environment. Using the Geodatabase Administration "Create Enterprise Geodatabase" tool I created an SDE database but I don't see a tool to an create an SDE instance / service for this new database. I need to create SDE spatial views so I need to create a instance is that correct?
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Regular Contributor III
Randy,

You don't need to create an ArcSDE service to create the spatial view:

A quick tour of views in the geodatabase:
http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//002q000000r2000000

Example: Creating a spatial view in SQL Server using SQL:
http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//002q000000r3000000
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10.1 onwards, there is no Post Installtion wizard to create new sde service. ArcSDE services need to be created using SDE Commandline tools.
Creating an ArcSDE service on Windows using the sdeservice command:
http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//002q00000044000000

Note: ArcSDE services and ArcSDE Commandline tools will be deprecated in future releases(10.2.1 onwards)

Regards,
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Regular Contributor III
a correction--

ArcSDE services and ArcSDE Commandline tools will be deprecated in the next Major release and not 10.2.1
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Esri Esteemed Contributor
Actually, the ArcSDE API and command-line tools were deprecated with the release of 10.2
(and will not be available at the next major release of ArcGIS).

- V
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Regular Contributor II
Deprecation plans for ArcGIS 10.1 and the upcoming release of ArcGIS 10.2.

The ArcGIS 10.2 series of releases (ArcGIS 10.2, 10.2.1, AND 10.2.2) will be the last releases that include the ArcSDE command line tools.

The ArcGIS 10.2 series of releases (ArcGIS 10.2, 10.2.1, AND 10.2.2) will be the last releases that include the ArcSDE application server.

The ArcGIS 10.2 series of releases (ArcGIS 10.2, 10.2.1, AND 10.2.2) will be the last releases that support the ArcSDE SDK with the ArcSDE C and Java APIs.
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MVP Regular Contributor
Actually, the ArcSDE API and command-line tools were deprecated with the release of 10.2
(and will not be available at the next major release of ArcGIS).

- V


The use of the word "deprecate" keeps causing confusion, especially for non-native English speakers, and maybe ESRI should replace it with more clear statements, especially there where final decisions about the fate of some component have been made. The meaning of it in for example the The Free Dictionary is also ambiguous:

"3. Computer Science To mark (a component of a software standard) as obsolete to warn against its use in the future so that it may be phased out."

Nowhere in this definition does it say that deprecate at release "n" means no availability at "n+1" (which seems the definition used by ESRI), instead of no availability at "n". I also can't even find this definition of "deprecate" in the on-line version of the Oxford Dictionaries, even though an entry for "deprecate" exists.

But maybe the ambiguity is what ESRI seeks??, allowing the possibility to extend availability of the software if demand by customers requires it?
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Esri Esteemed Contributor
Esri's use of "deprecate" is consistent with the rest of the software industry.  They try to be
as explicit as possible (hence the update to include the 10.2.2 service pack), but predicting
the future is notoriously hard, especially 2-3 years out, when most deprecation notices
are produced.

I disagree with your assertion that it would be possible to deprecate something at the version
in which it was removed.  Deprecation is always a future-looking process, which says, in effect,
"You can still use it now, but get used to the idea (now!) that you won't be able to use this
feature in the future."  Imagine if aircraft manufacturers deprecated landing gear in an
announcement that caused the wheel axles to disintegrate.

There is no hard-and-fast "n vs n+1" rule in the deprecation market, yet it is the minimum
effective notice that can be given, and once the decision is made, the developers have to
start working toward that goal.  It isn't always possible (Oracle deprecated use of LONG RAW
back at 10gR1, and it was still available at 11gR2), but it is good practice to make the change
as soon as practical (to avoid the "Well, we'll keep using it, and maybe they'll not make the
change, like last time" trap).  I do know that Esri is working to augment ArcObjects, Desktop,
and ArcPy to eliminate the need for ArcSDE command-line tools, so it seems very likely that
the "n+1" goal will be met.

- V
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MVP Regular Contributor
Esri's use of "deprecate" is consistent with the rest of the software industry.  They try to be as explicit as possible (hence the update to include the 10.2.2 service pack), but predicting the future is notoriously hard, especially 2-3 years out, when most deprecation notices are produced.


I totally agree and fully appreciate ESRIs efforts to be as explicit as reasonably possible, considering the constraints imposed by customers, developer time needed to make changes, and any technological challenges encountered.

I disagree with your assertion that it would be possible to deprecate something at the version in which it was removed.
...
There is no hard-and-fast "n vs n+1" rule in the deprecation market, yet it is the minimum effective notice that can be given


Vince, I wasn't asserting anything, just explaining that many people, even those in the software industry, aren't actually much aware of what the word "deprecation" means, hence I was suggesting that some other type of wording might be more effective in communicating it, especially when more or less "final" decisions have been made.

This is especially a challenge for non-native English speakers, like myself...

Imagine if aircraft manufacturers deprecated landing gear in an announcement that caused the wheel axles to disintegrate.
:D:rolleyes:
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Esri Esteemed Contributor
The first time I encountered the term "deprecated," Google was still in its infancy (as was Java,
where I encountered it).  The concept itself is fairly simple, and the term is a very apt way to
describe the phenomena. Much like other one-time unfamiliar terms that capture a process so
neatly, like "schadenfreude", folks who first encounter "deprecated" will likely need to look it up.
I don't see how any other wording would be less confusing, especially because there are no
"'final' decisions" until long after deprecation notices have been posted. 

The new software will explain "What's New" and how to replace older processes in clearer
terms, but for the time between planning and deployment, I'd argue a fuzzy term remains the
best way to capture the state of the changes.

- V
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