Arcgis entreprise understanding of system requirements

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04-03-2020 01:48 AM
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New Contributor

Hello everyone

I'll have to deploy an arcgis entreprise on a server. However ... first things first! I need a server and I do not all information I need to dimension the hardware. And I might be completely off as it is a premiere for me to deploy that kind of inrfastructure. I need advice from experienced people because I'm a bit lost with the ESRI documentation

The only constraint is a single machine deployment

Basically, I'll need to  deploy in a first step arcgis server, webadaptor, portal, Image server. 

So if i believe 

ArcgisServer 10.7 (or 10.8) 4 cores- RAM:8GB

Portal For Arcgis: 2 cores- RAM:8GB

Image Server: 2cores RAM:8GB

And the system should be scalable to incorporate arcgis geoevent server at a later stage

Geoevent server 2 cores- RAM:8GB

In terms of  storage I'll start with a 2*2To raid 0 mounted

As a minimum in development I  should require 10 cores-32GB RAM  2*2To drives.System should be scalable to  64GB RAM. Physical storage does not need to be scalable yet.

I do ignore the caches needed.

I do ignore connectivity requirements.

However I found such a configuration simply overkill at a first glance. Am I right? Or is it not engouh?

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The ESRI maintained, but unfortunately lesser known, "System Design Strategies" WikiGIS pages are your best friend:

System Design Strategies - GIS Wiki | The GIS Encyclopedia 

Especially see the:

- Platform Performance - GIS Wiki | The GIS Encyclopedia 

- Server Software Performance - GIS Wiki | The GIS Encyclopedia 

- Software Performance - GIS Wiki | The GIS Encyclopedia 

pages.

To be honest, I personally consider HDD utterly dead for any kind of serious spatial database / GIS related work, especially if it involves any form of (geo-)processing requiring random access to database records, rather than just serving out pre-rendered tiles or so. With the ever growing datasets nowadays, you are going to hit a wall. At a minimum, get SATA SSD, but even better some enterprise class NVMe SSD if you can afford it. I've pounded a cheap 2TB Samsung EVO SSD drive over the past two years writing hundreds of GBs of data to it on a regular basis without issues. Any HDD would probably have failed in the same period under the same workload.

I would also recommend 10 Gbit/s network between the server and any power workstation used for processing or massive data loading. For less demanding purposes, 1 Gbit/s should suffice, if the network bandwidth isn't shared by dozens or hundreds of other users. Separating the power users on a separate 10 Gbit/s sub network from ordinary users on a 1 Gbit/s network, might also help.

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Highlighted
MVP Regular Contributor

The ESRI maintained, but unfortunately lesser known, "System Design Strategies" WikiGIS pages are your best friend:

System Design Strategies - GIS Wiki | The GIS Encyclopedia 

Especially see the:

- Platform Performance - GIS Wiki | The GIS Encyclopedia 

- Server Software Performance - GIS Wiki | The GIS Encyclopedia 

- Software Performance - GIS Wiki | The GIS Encyclopedia 

pages.

To be honest, I personally consider HDD utterly dead for any kind of serious spatial database / GIS related work, especially if it involves any form of (geo-)processing requiring random access to database records, rather than just serving out pre-rendered tiles or so. With the ever growing datasets nowadays, you are going to hit a wall. At a minimum, get SATA SSD, but even better some enterprise class NVMe SSD if you can afford it. I've pounded a cheap 2TB Samsung EVO SSD drive over the past two years writing hundreds of GBs of data to it on a regular basis without issues. Any HDD would probably have failed in the same period under the same workload.

I would also recommend 10 Gbit/s network between the server and any power workstation used for processing or massive data loading. For less demanding purposes, 1 Gbit/s should suffice, if the network bandwidth isn't shared by dozens or hundreds of other users. Separating the power users on a separate 10 Gbit/s sub network from ordinary users on a 1 Gbit/s network, might also help.

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Many thanks for your insights.

I'll dig the provided documentation. 

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