Maintenance on one-way child replicas?

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10-21-2015 07:25 AM
AmyRoust
Occasional Contributor III

We have a one-way child replica of our master SDE database for our non-GIS staff to reference without being able to change the data. I run maintenance nightly on the parent database (compress, analyze, rebuild indexes), but I'm wondering if I need to do the same thing on the one-way child database? Since no one can edit on that child database, I'm wondering if the statistics and indexes just replicate over from the parent.

I haven't noticed any performance issues on the child replica, though I do have a nightly compress scheduled on it. I'm asking this as a "what's the best practice?" question.

Thanks in advance for feedback!

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AmyRoust
Occasional Contributor III

According to Esri tech support, the statistics and indexes do not replicate, so it is a good practice to analyze, compress, and rebuild indexes. Doing so will improve database performance. The frequency for doing these steps depends entirely on how many edits are being made on the data. Just like any database, those with large quantities of transactions will need more frequent maintenance than those that see infrequent updates. As far as I can tell, there is no magic formula for determining an ideal maintenance schedule based on the number of transactions. Really, the only disadvantage to frequent maintenance is the time investment (assuming you don't have a script scheduled to do it when you're out of the office) and any impacts that come from taking the database offline to get a good compress.

Thanks, Tina M. at Esri Support Services for answering this question over the phone for me!

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AmyRoust
Occasional Contributor III

Michael Jeggle​, can you answer this question?

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AmyRoust
Occasional Contributor III

According to Esri tech support, the statistics and indexes do not replicate, so it is a good practice to analyze, compress, and rebuild indexes. Doing so will improve database performance. The frequency for doing these steps depends entirely on how many edits are being made on the data. Just like any database, those with large quantities of transactions will need more frequent maintenance than those that see infrequent updates. As far as I can tell, there is no magic formula for determining an ideal maintenance schedule based on the number of transactions. Really, the only disadvantage to frequent maintenance is the time investment (assuming you don't have a script scheduled to do it when you're out of the office) and any impacts that come from taking the database offline to get a good compress.

Thanks, Tina M. at Esri Support Services for answering this question over the phone for me!