How many SQL Server licenses needed to run ArcGIS Enteprise

536
3
03-04-2021 03:54 PM
SpencerLarson
New Contributor III

I am confused and have been conflicting information how many SQL Server licensesare really needed for ArcGIS Enterprise.  Here locally we are planning a implementation of Enterprise and the main remaining question I have is how many licenses of SQL are needed.  Its my understanding that SQL licenses are licensed in packs of two (2 core license packs), and according to an implementation guide it recommends 4 cores for the database server, hence the reason 2 licenses would be needed  (this comes from a guide published in 2018).  Does this sound accurate?  Does it matter really which version of SQL is used Express, Standard, or Enterprise?  I can't find many good resources and I cant move forward with a purchase without this information.

If it helps I would say there would be a max of 20 editors at the same time and that is likely a high estimate.  My understanding is the portal that has any webmaps doesn't use the SQL, so I don't think that would be an issue, but if I were to estimate in the future how many instances of the webmaps to be pinged in the future I would estimate 1000 a day , if that makes any difference.

 

Any suggestions?  I don't want to waste money on any unnecessary software purchcases but I am lost and trying to find answers.

 

If it helps we are planning to purchase a M640 Dell Server with 3 blades as the main database server., my understandings its like 3 servers in one.

 

Thank you

 

Spencer

3 Replies
HenryLindemann
Esri Contributor

Hi @SpencerLarson,

So the ArcGIS datastore is a highly optimized SQL server, the services you publish to it is called Hosted Feature services, using it instead of a MS SQL server has a benefit in ram consumption and it is included in your purchase.

Then you can also have a look at PostgresSQL which is a free SQL server.

 

Then on MS Sql,

Express is free but it has a 10GIG Database limit 1410MB Ram limit and 4 cores and you will not be able to do a seamless upgrade should you decide to up the specs because of the way you access the express SQL is dns/sqlexpress versus just dns so if you change this you will have to re-publish the services.

Here in South Africa I mostly see a 4 core SQL deployment so that seems to be the standard.

 

On Portal,

A WebMap consists of services e.g Hosted Feature "Datastore", FeatureServer and MapServer "SQL" or "GDB", the WebMap itself is stored in ArcGIS portal but the services that is feeding it is coming from a data source, in order words you can have 100 WebMaps that have 1000 connections to a data source if they have 10 layers each.

I would start with a Standard SQL as this will give you room to upgrade if needed with minimum hassle.

and this is base on at least a Standard ArcGIS Enterprise purchase.

 

Hope it helps 

Henry

 

0 Kudos
SpencerLarson
New Contributor III

Henry- Thanks for your reply.  Since I work in the government sector, open source (i.e PostgresSQL) is not an option.  SQL Server seems to be the standard with the IT here so I think I am going that route.  It sounds based upon your email that you are recommending a 4 core SQL Deployment so I would need  to purchase two licenses of SQL (does this sound correct?).  As you seemed well versed in SQL, what would be the case where you would need a Enterprise version of SQL to run a Enterprise GIS as compared to Standard.

0 Kudos
HenryLindemann
Esri Contributor

Hi @SpencerLarson,

I think a 4 Core Sql Deployment will be a good starter system especially because you said you can go up to 100 WebMaps,

I do work with  SQL a lot but mostly standard deployment , so what I can see regarding MS SQL Enterprise is that it seems to be more geared for Advanced work so for High Availability and Data Science work in SQL

and since I don't see that you are using High Availability yet I am leaning to standard.

 [SOLVED] Microsoft SQL Standard vs Enterprise Licencing Question - SQL Server Forum - Spiceworks

 

I am also thinking that if you already have a SQL deployment then you can just create a DB on that MS SQL if the recourses are adequate.

Hope it helps 

Henry 

0 Kudos