Recommendations for improving accuracy while using Collector

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10-13-2020 06:55 AM
New Contributor

Hi, the city where I work is switching over to ArcGIS Online. I am trying to get Collector up and running for our field crews. They will be using Ipads and Iphones for collection. My boss asked if we could try and get the data points' accuracy higher. I am wondering if anyone has any recommendations for receivers? I saw the list that ESRI has posted but was curious if there are any that work better?  

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6 Replies
New Contributor

Also, I forgot to mention above, I was looking for more entry priced options. Such as the Bad Elf GPS

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New Contributor

Hi Seth - I think switching to a mobile data collection worklfow using AGOL/Collector and your phones/iPads will make for a very streamlined and intuitive system. Combine that with a higher accuracy Bluetooth receiver and you'll be good to go! 

There are several high accuracy BT GPS/GNSS devices available, but if you're looking for a more 'entry priced' option, I think a Bad Elf device is a good choice.  There are different tiers of the more entry-level Bad Elf units (e.g. Pro+, Surveyor) available, depending on the desired accuracy and price point.  None will provide submeter accuracy but can get you in the 1.25-2.5m range depending on the model. I work with high accuracy BT hardware and AGOL/Collector workflows.  If interested, I'd be happy to discuss pro/cons, prices for diff options. ryan@agsgis.com

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New Contributor

Hi Ryan,

 

Since we just switched over to Online I am going through the learning curve and trying to figure things out before we start rolling things out to the city

So with the data collection when I’ve gone out and used my Iphone I get data points within 30’ it says. I would love to have submeter accuracy but I just don’t have the budget for something that accurate currently. And that’s why I’m looking for something a bit cheaper that I could get a few of to get us within that 1-3 meter mark.

I am not entirely sure what the difference is between the entry level GPS’s and what the phones use to gather data points? If it’ll be worth buying the entry level GPS?

Just looking for some more information that I can go to my boss with

Also, I tried to send an email to the account above and i got an undelieverablee message

 

I appreciate you reaching out

Best Regards,

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New Contributor

Hmm... That's weird you got a bounce-back on that email.  Maybe check that the spelling or copy/paste

ryan@agsgis.com

Yeah, I hear ya; mapping with a phone/tablet only and getting 30ft accuracy isn't great.  It works, but for a lot of mapping exercises, that level of accuracy isn't going to provide a lot of value.  You know where your assets are, but only vaguely.  You can easily and 'affordably' get into the 1-3m range with a BT device, and the use of said device really doesn't change your workflow at all.  You can also just as easily get submeter accuracy or even centimeter-grade using BT hardware with your phone/tablet.  Obviously, the price goes up as accuracy improves.  But there are rental options available for shorter-term needs, if/when those needs arise.  Just hit me up and we can discuss  

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New Contributor II

I agree with Ryan. I've been testing the Garmin GLO2 external BT GPS/GLONASS-receiver with the Collector-app on an iPad. It works just fine for everyday data collection such as mapping hiking- and MTB-trails and collecting inventory of trees, signs, storm drains and so on. Not submeter accuracy but much better than the build in antenna in most handheld devices. Just turn it on, throw it in the top-poket of a backpack or your jacket, switch to external position input on the device and start mapping. Another feature is that since the external BT-antenna has its own power supply, the tablet/phone device will hold power for much longer working period than when using the internal GPS.

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New Contributor

Hi Seth,

Following are a few more considerations when looking at ROI's and work efficiencies of low cost, less accurate receivers vs full gnss (multi-constellation) bluetooth enabled receivers that work with Collector and just about any device.

Take a look at Eos Arrow GNSS receivers; especially the Arrow 100 or maybe the Lite.  While it costs more than a Bad Elf and other low end receivers the total cost of ownership can be higher for cheap receivers.

For example, if you want sub-meter accuracy, the BadElf can't deliver that in most cases, and if you can accept 1.25m from the Bad Elf by waiting 4 minutes, how much productivity is lost compared to 15 sec occupation time (or less) using a more accurate receiver like the Arrow 100?  The cost of labor due to slower performance from the cheap receiver quickly becomes more expensive than the higher capital cost of a better performing receiver.

And, Arrows leverage investments already made in front end hardware, i.e. tablets/smartphones and software/apps, not to mention working seamlessly with Collector.

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