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With Esri Technical Support, our goal is to provide you a world-class support experience and ensure your success with the ArcGIS Platform – and one part of that goal includes your online experience.

Including the posts and blogs here on GeoNet, Esri creates and maintains a vast network of online support resources, such as our main site, support.esri.com (which hosts a technical article knowledgebase, download links, product lifecycle documentation, and more), wiki.GIS.com, the GIS Dictionary, and many others.

For us to continue providing the best possible resources, we request your feedback through a brief survey: Esri Online Support Resources Survey.

Your responses will help us understand your support preferences and how Esri can best deliver the resources you need.

Thank you in advance, and we look forward to supporting you in the future!

Here at Esri Support, our goal is to provide you with a world-class support experience and ensure your success with the ArcGIS Platform--one element of this experience is online support.

Including this blog, Esri creates and maintains a vast network of online support resources, such as Support.Esri.com (which hosts a technical article knowledgebase, download links, product life cycle documentation, and more), Wiki.GIS.com, GeoNet forums (Esri Support actively uses the Esri Technical Support and ArcGIS Ideas places), the GIS Dictionary, among others.For us to continue creating the best resources possible, we request your feedback through a brief survey: Esri Online Support Resources Survey.

Your responses will help us understand your online support preferences and how Esri can deliver the resources you need.

Thank you in advance, and we look forward to supporting you in the future!Other Resources
Megan S. - Online Support Resources
Are you going to the Esri Developer Summit this year? Perhaps you have some questions or need help and would like some special assistance from our Technical Support Analysts? Come see us at the GIS Technical Support Island (TSI) in the Esri Showcase.
devsummit-support-300x225.jpg

The GIS Technical Support Island at Esri Dev Summit 2017



Esri Technical Support will have ten senior analysts available each day of the Developer Summit to assist customers with any technical questions or issues they may have with Esri products. These analysts are subject matter experts that span the many parts of the ArcGIS platform, so we should be able to help with most questions. However, if the problem is more complex, we will create a Support case and contact you later when you're available. We will be stationed right next to several other Esri services, including Consulting, Training, and Cloud Management. If your questions lead us to a conversation about one of our other services, we will connect you with an expert in that area, as well.

In Support, each of the following teams and specialties will be represented:DevSummit_Edited.pngOutside of the TSI, you can find Support Analysts throughout the summit, including at different sessions, demo theater presentations, and the Meet the Teams event.

Stop by and say hello!
Gregory L. - Online Support Resources
This blog post is the 2nd in a series of JavaScript debugging tips and tricks to help you on your way. See JavaScript Debugging Tips Part I – Google Chrome and the Network Tab for our first segment.


The most enjoyable part of any programming assignment is right near the beginning when you sit down with a pile of tools and resources and start hammering away at raw clumps of code. The more difficult part comes when you attempt to launch the application, only to watch that tightly-written code unravel into multiple late nights staring at a computer screen. However, all is not lost, as we have an excellent recommendation for you, which is the subject of this blog: the Console tab inside your favorite browser's Developer Tools.

If you’re feeling upset or emotional, the Console tab is the perfect choice for you. Maybe someone in your family is dealing with a difficult time, and could use some cheering up. Consider the Google Chrome Console tab (gluten free options are available). Users who like the Console tab might also enjoy the ArcGIS API for JavaScript.
Sad_Console.png

I obviously do not understand homographs



As we wrote in Part I, accessing the Chrome Developer Tools is easily done using shortcut keys (Control + Shift + I) or by navigating to the top right of the browser, clicking on the hamburger and choosing “More Tools”, then “Developer tools”.

Once the Developer Tools are open (other Developer Tools are available in other browsers), there are several Tabs that become accessible to you. Here we will focus on the Console. If you want to open the Console tab in Chrome Developer Tools directly, use this keyboard shortcut: Control + Shift + J (the “J” stands for jocular). For more neat tips, please check out the official Google documentation about Chrome DevTools: Using the console.

The Console is used for two purposes: 1) to display logged information from an application's JavaScript (usually during application development), and 2) to interrogate objects and execute JavaScript interactively. In this blog, we will look at both kinds of examples, and elaborate on some additional tips and tricks that we use in Technical Support.

The first thing we can do is to add some “console.log” statements inside our application. We will take a modified sample, hosted on GitHub, which can be found here: Sample Console Application. Feel free to follow along at home.

At lines 60-62, and again at line 66, we’ve added some of those “console.log” statements to display information about our Feature Layer. Our use case is that we are creating a web mapping application, and during our testing, we want to ensure that the data we are consuming from ArcGIS Online is the correct data to display on the map. To this end, we print out a few choice pieces of information about the Feature Layer: the title of the layer, and the URL of the layer. Since I do not know the syntax for the URL property, I use “URL” and “url” as seen below.
ConsoleLog_JavaScriptCode.png

JavaScript console.log statements



Here is a screenshot of the output of the “console.log” statements. We see the relevant information we were expecting. Also, please note that the output for “featureLayer.URL” is “undefined”. This is because items in the console are case sensitive. The valid property is “featureLater.url”, and invalid properties do not throw an error, and instead return an undefined result. This can be a tricky thing to trap, but later on in this blog we will look at some tips for dealing with this sort of issue.
JavaScript_Write_To_Console_Example1.png

JavaScript Console Output from console.log



With the Console still open, let’s try entering the same property values from the code:

featureLayer.titlefeatureLayer.URLfeatureLayer.url


Notice that all of these properties now return an error, instead of an actual value (or even “undefined”). This is because the local variables are no longer in scope after the app is initialized, so even the “featureLayer” object cannot be recognized.  Here is a screenshot of the output of the new console statements.
JavaScript_Write_To_Console_Example2.png

JavaScript Console Output after App is loaded



If we had made “featureLayer” a global variable, we would then see “undefined” returned for the object in the Console (variable is known, but the details are still not accessible). The point is: only variables that are in scope can be interrogated in the Console. So can we use the Console interactively and type in property values? Let’s find out.

The next thing we can do to our sample app is to add a “debugger;” statement in the code. We will take another modified sample, hosted on GitHub, which can be found here: Sample Console Application 2. Feel free to follow along at home.

At line 60, we’ve added a “debugger;” statement to help display information about our Feature Layer in the Console.
JavaScript_Write_To_Console_Example3.png

JavaScript debugger statement



How does this statement work? Click the link to run the application. Then, open the Developer Tools (Control + Shift + I or Control + Shift + J), and refresh the application. The application should pause, and you should see a “Paused in debugger” message at the top of the screen, and the “debugger” line highlighted in the Sources tab:
PausedDebugger2.png

Paused in debugger 1



Now, with the application paused, we can go back to the Console tab, and try interrogating the featureLayer properties again. Here we see that we have proper scope to the variable and we can see the output:
PausedDebugger3.png

Paused in debugger 2



Cool, right?

Let’s look at another option, similar to “debugger”. Back to the Sources tab, notice the line numbers to the left of the code. If we left-click on a line number, we can set a breakpoint, which will have the exact same effect as writing “debugger” in the code. Left-click on lines 56, 62, and 66 in the same application, then refresh the application.
Breakpoint1.png

Breakpoint 1



The application pauses immediately at the first breakpoint. Now, we could go back to the Console tab and again inspect variables and properties to our heart's content. Not only that, by clicking the curved arrow to the right of the Play button at the top of the screen, we can step through our application and watch the excitement as we see how the code executes step-by-step. Or, we can click the Play button at the top of the screen, and let the application run to completion, or to the next breakpoint.
Breakpoint2.png

Breakpoint 2



And another Play button click brings us to the next breakpoint.
Breakpoint3.png

Breakpoint 3



The point of this blog is to highlight the usefulness and functionality of the Console, but we do want to point out another usage of setting breakpoints here as well. Breakpoints allow the developer the ability to see the order in which asynchronous code executes, how functions are run and what parts get skipped or fail. For more information about debugging tips with JavaScript applications, here are a couple additional resources from the past several years:
In this installment, we learned how to access and use the Console tab inside Chrome Developer tools to reveal the properties and values of variables and objects in our JavaScript code. This information can greatly facilitate the debugging and coding of a web-based application. This concludes part two of a multi-part series on JavaScript Debugging Tips. Join us next time when we delve even deeper into some Developer Tools, and we all get raises. Happy debugging!
Noah S. and John G. - SDK Support Services

Tips for figuring out what is going on when things aren’t working in ArcMap

Have ever you called Esri Support Services (ESS) with one question and the analyst asks you a seemingly unrelated question? Perhaps you are trying to open a DBF in ArcMap, and we want to know what version of Excel you use. Or perhaps you cannot access printing drivers and we ask you how much memory ArcMap is using. Sometimes the questions we ask can seem random, but they help us narrow down the root cause of the problematic behavior. Most processes in ArcMap involve multiple parts and file locations, so it can be difficult to determine what drives a specific behavior without taking a systematic approach to ruling out possible causes. To that end, this post provides a series of questions that will help you narrow down what may be causing problematic behaviors.

 

Do you Meet the Minimum System Requirements?

This is a simple question and hopefully one that was asked prior to installation, but it is always encouraged to check, particularly if you recently upgraded your software. A quick way to check if you meet the system requirements is to use the Can You Run It tool. If your system does not meet the requirements, you may need to upgrade your system.

 

Does ArcMap Open?

If ArcMap does not open, or crashes when opening a new, blank map document, this indicates that either something is wrong with the installation of ArcGIS Desktop or with the local customization of the program. In this case, here are a few troubleshooting steps:

  • Perform a soft reset (remove local customizations including folder connections and toolbar arrangement) by renaming the "C:\Users\<USERNAME>\AppData\Roaming\ESRI" folder as "Esri_old". When you reopen ArcMap, the folder is re-created.

Note: the AppData folder is a hidden folder, so you may need to unhide it.

  • Repair the software by navigating to Control Panel > Programs and Features > right click on ArcGIS Desktop > Uninstall/Change. Select the option to repair. Once the repair is finished, reboot the machine and test again.

 

Is the Issue MXD Specific?

When encountering a problematic behavior in ArcMap, a good place to start is to determine if the problem only occurs in a specific MXD. You can do this by opening a brand new MXD, dragging and dropping the data from the original MXD to the new one, and then trying to reproduce the issue. You can also copy and paste layout elements from one MXD to another. If the issue does not occur in the new MXD:

  1. Use the new MXD you created to test if everything is working correctly.
  2. If you have elements that cannot be easily copied and pasted from one MXD to another, use the MXD Doctor utility.
Stay tuned for an upcoming blog on MXD troubleshooting!

Is the Issue Workflow Specific?

Many users have multi-step processes in ArcMap as a part of their workflow; however, the more steps used, the more likely it is that an error can creep in. An error early on in a multi-step process can make it difficult to determine the root cause, as the issue can be introduced several steps before being observed.

Some steps that can assist in sorting out these workflow issues are:

  1. Write out the entire workflow from data acquisition to the step where the issue is seen.
  2. Teach the workflow to someone else. Often we only catch our mistakes when we have to explain what we did to another person.
  3. If you are using a script or model to perform a workflow, try the same workflow manually. If it works manually, break the script or model into parts and test each part individually.

 

Is the Issue Data Specific?

If the issue still occurs when you move the data to a new MXD, it is possible that the issue is data specific. To see if this is the case, test similar data that is stored in the same location, is in the same format, and contains similar features. For example, if you have trouble editing a shapefile containing points, edit a different point shapefile. If you do not have appropriate data to test with, you can also create a new shapefile, add some features to it, and test with that. If the issue only occurs with a specific dataset, then it is possible to take some basic data troubleshooting steps such as:

  1. Export the file to a different format (for example, export shapefile to feature class or GRID raster to TIFF).
  2. With vector data, try the Check Geometry and Repair Geometry tools.
  3. If the data does not draw in the correct location, check the projection. If the layer was created in one projection, and the projection was not correctly assigned to the data, it can draw in unexpected locations. For more information about figuring out what projection data was collected in, see here.

 

Is the Issue Location Specific?

Another potential cause of unexpected behavior is the location of the data. Location includes both the physical location (local machine drive versus server) and the workspace (geodatabase or folder). If the data is being accessed over a network, any issues or restrictions on the network may affect the way the data behaves in ArcMap. Likewise, any issues or permission limitations in the geodatabase can contribute to problematic behavior. If you suspect the issue is location specific:

  1. Move the data. If it is in an SQL database, move it to a file geodatabase or another SQL database. If it is on a network drive, move it to a local drive, then see if the issue persists.
  2. Ensure you have appropriate permissions for the location of your data.

 

Is the Issue Install Specific?

If the problematic behavior persists in all MXDs and with different datasets in different locations, there may be an issue with the installation. It is possible that either the installation file was corrupt or that the file was corrupted after installation. The troubleshooting steps in this case are the same as those for when ArcMap does not open at all. If you suspect the install file might have become corrupt during download, you can re-download the install file from My.Esri.com and reinstall.

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A diagramatic view of the ArcGIS troubleshooting workflow

The Internet Is Your Friend (Mostly)

Most of the time, you aren't the first person to experience a particular issue and chances are, you can unearth some relevant findings on the internet. A good starting place is always ArcGIS documentation. If an issue is particularly common, it may be documented in Esri’s Knowledge Base, a collection of technical articles written by Esri staff. Larger issues, such as troubleshooting ArcMap performance or not being able to load Esri basemaps, may have been topics on the ArcGIS Blog or Support Services blog. Additionally, Esri hosts a very active user forum, GeoNet, where developers and other members of the Esri community can ask or answer posted questions. However, if you do find a suggested workflow, always remember that what works for someone else may not work for you. Therefore, it is highly encouraged to make copies of any MXDs or data, and proceed with caution.

 

Call ESS

The above steps do not address all possible issues, but they are effective and thorough starting points when trying to narrow down issues in ArcMap. If you still cannot narrow it down, give Esri Support a call! Our job is to assist you with these particular issues, and we always enjoy helping our customers resolve whatever issues they may be facing! When you do have to call, we kindly ask that you have the following information available so we can route you to the best analyst for the job and ensure that analyst has the information needed to begin troubleshooting with you!

  • Software version and license level
  • Operating system
  • Device, if using a mobile application
  • Synopsis of the issue
  • Detailed workflow
  • Error message
  • Test data

Note: You can contact ESS through phone, web chat, and web form. Start here.

We look forward to hearing from you!


Rebecca R. - Desktop Support Analyst

If you want to know how much traffic your ArcGIS Server site can handle, you'll have to thoroughly test. And because you're probably not going to convince thousands of people to log on to your apps and services all at once, you need something like JMeter to perform load testing.

My first introduction to performance testing, and really just the JMeter in general, was with this awesome blog post from Randall Williams. I eventually started to use JMeter widely and also suggested users to run a sanity check and load test their GIS environments before moving to production.

In the enterprise world, a domain-based approach is widely used for secure authentication and authorization, where credentials of currently logged in Windows users are seamlessly passed to web applications, allowing single-sign-on. JMeter lets you emulate requests being sent from a real user by constructing relevant headers and passing them along with the request. This post focuses on configuring JMeter to perform load testing when the services are secured with Integrated Windows Authentication (IWA).

Here, I assume you have already installed JMeter and created a test plan. If you haven't, fret not! Refer to this blog for a detailed walkthrough: Preparing for the flood: Will your GIS Server sink or swim?

Once you have modified ArcGIS Server for Windows Authentication, you can forge ahead with adjusting JMeter to handle the authentication challenge. Here are the steps:

1. Navigate to the JMeter bin directory (apache-jmeter-2.7/bin).

2. Open the file jmeter.properties in text editor and set to the following:
httpclient.parameters.file=httpclient.parameters

3. Save and close the file.

4. Open the file httpclient.parameters and set to the following:
http.authentication.preemptive$Boolean=true

5. Save and close the file.

6. You must use the HTTP Authorization Manager configuration element to construct a relevant authentication header. The Authorization Manager lets you specify one or more user logins for web pages that are restricted using server authentication.

7. Complete the HTTP Authorization Manager as follows:

Username: “User logon name” for Windows domainPassword: Windows domain passwordDomain: [DOMAIN]
Other fields like “Base URL” and “Mechanism” can be left as it is.

HTTP-Authorization-Manager1.jpg


To accurately simulate the users, you can setup each thread to login with different credentials by placing an HTTP Authorization Manager configuration element in each thread group element.Tip: You can add a 'View Results Tree' listener to debug your test plan. Thus, you can review the request and response data to ensure that your test plan works well.

Below is a sample request with the Authorization Manager disabled:

HTTP-manager-Disabled.jpg


Below is a properly configured HTTP Authorization Manager:

Authorization-header1.jpg


Here you can see JMeter sending authentication information in an Authorization header: NTLM.

Because the way Microsoft NTLM (also known as Windows Challenge/Response) and IWA work, the first few requests return a 401 response as part of the NTLM handshake scheme. This means that for the first request, you might encounter an unusually high response time.

resulttable1-e1480568206105.jpg


This should help you understand how your services from ArcGIS Server would perform with Windows Authentication security. You may have a more complex situation if more Active Directory domains are involved (for example, domain trusts, forest trusts, complex nested groups, and so forth), or if there is a performance issue with your domain controller. Head over to your Active Directory Administrator for more information. If there's a performance bottleneck that cannot be eased, you may want to use the other type of security scheme.

Happy load testing!
Divyam Gulati - Server Support Analyst

Hello,

 

For practice I tried to perform a simple Projection on a Feature class.  The original Projected Coordinate system was NAD_1983_StatePlane_California_VI_FIPS_0406_Feet and the output was into NAD_1983_StatePlane_California_V_FIPS_0405_Feet.  (The only change was from FIPS_0406 to FIPS_0405).

The result was  a red circle with an "x" and next to it was 000000_12301899  (which I assume was the error).  

Below that it showed that the output was empty.    

My version of software is ARC_GIS 10.4.1.

I have a Windows 10.

 

Again this was for practice so you dont have to spend much time on this but I do like to know what the problem is.

 

Thanks,

Michael

 

PS.  I attached two screenshots.  One is with the Hiearchy Tree unopened while the other is opened.  The two extra errors at the Bottom are just another iteration of me running the tool.

 

icon3.png3D data is becoming more ubiquitous nowadays and is especially promoted throughout the ArcGIS Platform. From web scenes, to CityEngine, to ArcGIS Pro, there are many different applications to import, manage, model, and share your 3D data. To get the output you are looking for, it may require numerous steps and tools. To navigate some of these steps and tools, here are some tips and tricks for working with 3D data in ArcGIS.

3D File Coordinate Systems


The majority of 3D formats do not store a coordinate system. GeoVRML and KML are the lone exceptions. KML will use a WGS 1984 coordinate system and meters for the unit of measurement. All other types (DAE, 3DS, OBJ) must be placed properly, otherwise they may import at "0,0" (off the coast of Africa).Trick #1

If you are using CityEngine, you can drag and drop your shape from the Navigator window into the scene (this workflow assumes a scene coordinate system is already set). When you export the shape to a multipatch feature class, the coordinate system is created with the data so you can bring it into another ArcGIS product.Import OverviewTrick #2

The same workflow can be accomplished in ArcGIS Pro. Create an empty multipatch feature class, navigate to Editor > Create Features > Select Model, and click the globe to place the model.SelectModel-300x125.pngTrick #3Use the Replace with Model tool (ArcScene or ArcGlobe) or the Replace with Multipatch tool (ArcGIS Pro).replace.pngArcGIS Desktop Replace with ModelArcGIS Pro Replace with MultipatchTrick #4

If you are using ArcScene, ArcGlobe, or ArcGIS Pro, manually place the model during an edit session using the Move, Rotate, or Scale operations.Move, rotate, or scale a featuremove.pngNote: There is known issue with the Import 3D files tool. The placement points parameter is not honored so as of ArcGIS 10.4.1 or ArcGIS Pro 1.3, this tool is not a viable option. This issue is planned to be fixed in a future release.

Textures


To import your 3D file with textures, you must ensure the texture resides next to the 3D file, either as an individual image file or a folder with the images.Note: Both the file and folder must have same name for the software to recognize the texture.Trick #1

Textures are only supported in file or enterprise geodatabases. Shapefile multipatches do not support textures, so make sure to import the multipatch into a geodatabase.

Z-values


Make sure your 3D data has valid z-values. When sharing a web scene or importing the data into ArcGIS Pro, you want to make sure the elevation values are correct.Trick #1

If your multipatch is not at the correct elevation, you can use this trick. In ArcGIS Pro,Elevation-300x190.pngset the multipatch data "on the ground" and use the Layer 3D To Feature Class tool. The elevation values are then embedded into the multipatch.Trick #2

If you are using simple feature data (non-multipatch), use the Add Surface Information tool to add z-values to the data. Also, you can add z-values to an attribute table and with the Add Z Information tool, you can verify the values with the tool's output. If the data does not have valid elevation values, see the next tip.

Tools to Create 3D Data


Understand which tools can create 3D data: Layer 3D To Feature Class, Interpolate Shape, or Feature To 3D By Attribute.

Understanding 3D Data


Understand your 3D data. Extruded 2D polygons are not true 3D features, so you must export to multipatch to make the polygon a true 3D feature. Simple point, line, and polygon features can be considered 3D data if they have the correct z-values. 2D features can also be symbolized using 3D marker symbology.

Know the difference between a z-enabled feature class and a non-z-enabled feature class with a z field in the attribute table. Feature classes must be z-enabled to display at the correct elevation. You might see a z field in the attribute table, but that does not mean the geometry has the correct z-values. This can be verified by editing the vertices or adding z-values to an attribute table, as described above.

While this blog does not cover every facet of working with 3D data, it is my hope that this will provide some valuable information for working with 3D data on the ArcGIS Platform.
Andrew J. – Desktop Support Analyst

I’ve installed the new PerfTools add-in for ArcGIS Pro; what are some scenarios in which this new tool can help optimize performance?

 

Displaying and Logging Rendering Time for Specific Spatial Extents

Have you created a series of spatial bookmarks in your ArcGIS Pro project? A one-line script command (ZoomToBookmarks all) can zoom through these spatial bookmarks and log draw time, frames per second (FPS) metrics, and other timestamps. No bookmarks?  No problem…you can also specify extents by providing 2D or 3D camera positions in the same spatial coordinates as your data. Capture_BookmarksLog-1024x611.png

 

Playing and Timing Animations

Have you added an animation? Using the PlayAnimation command returns measures of total elapsed animation time, as well as average and minimum FPS.

 

Roaming

To build a thorough display cache or simulate navigation through large datasets without specifying bookmarks or camera positions, you can use the roaming capabilities of PerfTools. This allows you to virtually “walk” across the active view, starting from the upper left and moving row-by-row towards the lower right. The total draw time, in addition to average and minimum FPS, are logged for your reference.

RoamingDiagram-300x300.png

 

Timing Spatial Selection

Moving from a file geodatabase to an enterprise geodatabase? Or have you updated your spatial index? You can examine the impacts these changes have on making spatial selections in ArcGIS Pro. The SelectFeatures command allows you to specify your selection bounding box in screen coordinates on the active 2D or 3D view. PerfTools logs a count of the features selected, as well as the selection and draw complete times.

 

Scripting Commands

Most power from the PerfTools add-in comes through a comprehensive scripting language that allows you to assemble several commands into a more comprehensive scenario. With this functionality, you can simulate typical user interactions with ArcGIS Pro, including creating and opening projects, panning, zooming, selecting, and so forth. You can add delays or “think time”, as well as looping commands (ForCount, ForFile, ForFolder, and ForTime) to repeat key parts of your workflow. Via script command, you can also control key aspects of logging content and structure in PerfTools.

 

Custom Script Commands

Not finding the script command you’re looking for? PerfTools allows you to create your own commands through leveraging the ArcGIS Pro SDK. Part of the PerfTools download includes documentation and a sample, “T1Command”, that gets you started with your own customizations.

 

More Documentation?

After installing the add-in and opening Pro, Take a look in your Documents\ArcGIS\AddIns\ArcGISPro\PerfTools folder.  You should see a PDF there titled "PerfTools_for_ArcGIS_Pro.pdf".  This contains comprehensive documentation and sample code snippets.

 

Is PerfTools comprehensive? You bet! We’ll be taking a closer look at some of these techniques in upcoming blog posts. In the meantime, feel free to download the PerfTools AddIn and try it out for yourself! 


Ian S. – Performance Engineer
With almost every new release of ArcGIS Desktop and ArcGIS for Server, there are changes that aim to improve software quality and performance; sometimes, these changes require you to update your workflows. The improvements and deprecations made for geocoding in ArcMap 10.5 and ArcGIS Pro 1.4 may break some existing workflows or require you to prepare before installing ArcGIS 10.5. In this post, we'll give you an overview of these changes. 

1. Address locators stored in geodatabases are no longer supported, as specified in the deprecation notice for ArcGIS 10.4 and 10.4.1. As such, you must move or copy the address locators from the geodatabase to a file folder before installing ArcGIS Desktop and ArcGIS Server 10.5. By doing this, you'll avoid the following issues in ArcGIS 10.5:
  • Address locators currently stored in geodatabases do not display as inputs to tools nor are visible in ArcCatalog when viewing the geodatabase content.
  • Starting a geocode service published from an address locator that is stored in a geodatabase fails to create an instance and returns an error in the server logs.
  • Publishing an address locator stored in a geodatabase or an .sd file that references an address locator stored in a geodatabase directly to ArcGIS Server 10.5 will return an error in the server logs.

2. We made several improvements to the US Address locator styles, such as adding fields and reordering input fields used when building an address locator. However, these improvements break any existing workflows that use Python scripts and Model Builder models to create address locators. These issues occur without an error or warning message and render the address locators unusable. Furthermore, geocoding services created from these locators and used in web applications are impacted in ArcGIS 10.5.

To avoid these issues, update the field mapping in the scripts and models after installing ArcMap 10.5 and ArcGIS Pro 1.4 but before running the scripts and models. There are also additional output fields that display in the geocode result that are similar to the output fields of StreetMap Premium and the World Geocoding Service.

3. If it is necessary to continue using the US Address locator style from ArcGIS 10.4 to create address locators after installing ArcGIS Desktop 10.5, contact Esri Support Services to request access to the USAddress.lot.xml file.

For more information, please refer to this technical article index, which covers more detailed solutions to the aforementioned issues.
Shana B. - Product Engineer
02/06/2017 Update: Patches have been released for Portal for ArcGIS version 10.3 and 10.4, which can be found here. We are continuing to work on patches for ArcGIS Server Manager (10.2.x, 10.3, and 10.4) and Portal for ArcGIS (10.2.x). We appreciate your patience as these patches are being developed.11/23/2016 Update: Patches have been released for ArcGIS Server version 10.3.1 and 10.4.1, which can be found here. We are continuing to work on patches for ArcGIS Server Manager (10.2.x, 10.3, and 10.4) and Portal for ArcGIS (10.2.x, 10.3, and 10.4). We appreciate your patience as these patches are being developed.11/10/2016 Update: Patches have been released for Portal for ArcGIS versions 10.3.1 and 10.4.1, which can be found here. We are continuing to develop patches for ArcGIS Server Manager (10.2.x, 10.3.x, and 10.4.x) and Portal for ArcGIS at version 10.2.x, 10.3, and 10.4.

The forthcoming updates to the Firefox, Chrome, and Safari browsers cause errors in some web applications for ArcGIS Server and Portal for ArcGIS when users upload content.The following browser versions are affected:
  • Firefox 49 (Release Date: September 20, 2016)
  • Chrome 54 (Release Date: October 18, 2016)
  • Safari 10 (Release Date: September 20, 2016)
Note: Microsoft Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge are not affected.The following ArcGIS products are affected:
  • ArcGIS Server 10.2.x, 10.3.x, and 10.4.x (patch deployed on 11/14/2016 for ArcGIS Server 10.3.1 and 10.4.1)
  • Portal for ArcGIS 10.2.x, 10.3, and 10.4 (patch deployed on 12/16/2016 for Portal for ArcGIS 10.3, 10.3.1, 10.4 and 10.4.1)
  • The ArcGIS API for JavaScript (patch deployed on 9/19/2016 for versions 3.11 and above.
The following workflows are affected:Portal for ArcGIS Home Application
  • Updating details for any content, such as items within “My Content” or fields within a user profile
  • Creating new groups via "Groups" > "Create A Group"
  • Uploading content via "My Content" > "Add Item" > "From my computer"
  • Uploading content to the Portal for ArcGIS Map Viewer via "Add" > "Add Layer from File"
  • Adding attachments when editing features in the Portal for ArcGIS Map Viewer
  • Updating thumbnails on any Item Details page or via "My Organization" > "Edit Settings" > "General"
  • Updating the banner or background images via "My Organization" > "Edit Settings" > "Home Page"

Below is an example of the error encountered when attempting to upload content in the Portal for ArcGIS home application.
PortalUploadError.png

This example shows the error which can be seen when trying to upload content to Portal for ArcGIS

ArcGIS Server Manager
  • Uploading service definitions (SD) when publishing services
  • Uploading SDE database connection files when registering a database as a data store
  • Uploading SOE or SOI files when adding extensions
  • Uploading KMZ files

Below is an example of the error encountered when attempting to upload an SD in ArcGIS Server Manager.
ManagerUploadError.png

This example shows the error seen when uploading content to ArcGIS Server Manager



To resolve these errors, Esri is developing software patches for ArcGIS Server and Portal for ArcGIS. We will keep you informed as the patches become available.
Thomas E. - User Advocacy
Get-map-data2.jpgThe CityEngine 2016.0 release was a ground breaking release. For those who are new to CityEngine and unfamiliar with the workflows, the new release cuts out a significant amount of time required to access and prepare data for use in CityEngine. For those who still want to use their own data…great!

You can find more information about preparing your data here.

For those who want a quick way of getting data and getting a CityEngine project up and running as quickly as possible, CityEngine 2016 is here to help with the Get map data wizard.

The Get map data wizard can be accessed by opening a scene in CityEngine and going to File > Get map data.  In the wizard, use the map to zoom to and select the area you want data from. The area selected can be from 500 m x 500 m to 100,000 m x 100,000 m. Three types of data can be grabbed by the wizard: Basemap, Esri World Elevation, and OpenStreetMap.

The basemap data is used as imagery (also referred to as texture) to be draped over the elevation layer. The basemap options allow you to select the basemap you want (Satellite, Streets, Topo, Dark Gray, or Light Gray), along with the image resolution. The resolution you select will determine the number of pixels the imagery has. The actual resolution of the imagery will depend on both the extent and resolution. For example, a 500 meter extent with a low resolution of 1024 pixels wide is less grainy than a 1,000 meter extent with the same resolution. As high resolution is not available across the globe, you may need to choose a lower resolution or larger area to get data. The Esri World Elevation will pull terrain data, or digital elevation model (DEM) data, from the Esri elevation service. OpenStreetMap data includes networks (streets) and polygons (building footprints).  OpenStreetMap is an open source, user-produced dataset, so coverage cannot be guaranteed, particularly for building footprints.

One thing to keep in mind when selecting data is that CityEngine is a memory intensive program and the larger the area and the higher the resolution, the more memory is required. If the computer has limited memory, you must consider that when selecting data to import.

With each new version of CityEngine, the software gets smarter, easier, and more groundbreaking. This blog only touched on the Get map data portion of the software, but there are more exciting features to check out, such as sharing scene packages, alembic modeling, and accessing data from ArcGIS Online. For a full list of new features, go here.
Rebecca R. & Andrew J. - Desktop Support
At Esri, we are always looking to provide you with cutting-edge capabilities that help turn GIS ideas into a powerful reality. One of our newer features is the ability to create, serve, and consume vector tiles, and it is exciting to see users taking advantage of this technology. We would like to take this opportunity to address some of the system requirements needed to implement these services.

As per our Vector tile services documentation, in order to share vector tile layers within your own infrastructure, you will need ArcGIS 10.4 for Server or higher - including the full Web GIS stack. This is comprised of Portal for ArcGIS, a hosting server using ArcGIS Server, and ArcGIS Data Store. To create the vector tiles, you will use ArcGIS Pro 1.2 or higher.

You might ask: Why are ArcGIS Pro and Portal for ArcGIS required to accomplish this task?

ArcGIS Pro offers a robust system of authoring capabilities, which allows content creators to build beautiful maps; and it has the tools to store these maps as vector tile packages for sharing with portals. These vector tile packages are then uploaded and shared through your portal, whether that is ArcGIS Online or Portal for ArcGIS.
VectorTilesDemo_medium-1024x472.png

Vector tile layers can be restyled without needing to rebuild the vector tile package.



Vector tile layers have unique capabilities. For example, they can be easily restyled with a custom look and feel, which happens dynamically without needing to rebuild the vector tile package. This is possible because Portal for ArcGIS takes advantage of the ArcGIS geoinformation model, which allows you to use, create, and share geographic information throughout your organization, the community, and openly on the web. For ArcGIS Server users who are used to sharing map layers with a portal by registering the REST endpoints as an item, or by creating custom applications directly against those REST endpoints, the geoinformation model provides a more flexible framework whereby geographic information is arranged into map and scene layers. These can be combined to build maps and scenes that can also be used in apps, in analysis, shared with groups, and so on.
GeoinformationModel.png

The ArcGIS geoinformation model is a framework that lets users easily build informative and compelling maps by pulling different layers together.



To recap, create vector tile layers and vector tile packages using ArcGIS Pro. Share the vector tile packages with Portal for ArcGIS. The portal will automatically unpack the package so that other people can use those vector tile layers in their maps and apps.
Thomas E. - Server Advocacy Lead
With the addition of the Train Random Trees Classifier, Create Accuracy Assessment Points, Update Accuracy Assessment Points, and Compute Confusion Matrix tools in ArcMap 10.4, as well as all of the image classification tools in ArcGIS Pro 1.3, it is a great time to check out the image segmentation and classification tools in ArcGIS for Desktop. Here we discuss image segmentation, compare the four classifiers (Train Iso Cluster Classifier, Train Maximum Likelihood Classifier, random trees, and Support Vector Machine), and review the basic classification workflow.Image Segmentation

Before you begin image classification, you may want to consider segmenting the image first. Segmentation groups similar pixels together and assigns the average value to all of the grouped pixels. This can improve classification significantly and remove speckles from the image.Train Iso Cluster Classifier

The Iso Cluster is an unsupervised classifier (that is, it does not require a training sample), with which the user can set the number of classes and divide a multiband image into that number of classes. This classifier is the easiest of all the classifiers to use, as it does not require creating a training sample and can handle very large segmented images. However, this classifier is not as accurate as the other classifiers due to the lack of training sample.Train Maximum Likelihood Classifier

The Maximum Likelihood Classifier (MLC) uses Bayes' theorem of decision making and is a supervised classifier (that is, the classifier requires a training sample). The training data is used to create a class signature based on the variance and covariance. Additionally, the algorithm assumes a normal distribution of each class sample in the multidimensional space, where the number of dimensions equals the number of bands in the image. The classifier then compares each pixel to the multidimensional space for each class and assigns the pixel to the class that the pixel has the maximum likelihood of belonging to based on its location in the multidimensional space.Train Random Trees Classifier

One supervised classifier that was introduced with ArcGIS 10.4 is the random trees classifier, which breaks the training data into a random sub-selection and creates classification decision trees for each sub-selection. The decision trees run for each pixel, and the class that gets assigned to the pixel most often by the trees is selected as the final classification. This method is resistant to over-fitting due to small numbers of training data and/or large numbers of bands. This classifier also allows the inclusion of auxillary data, including segmented images and digital elevation model (DEM) data.Train Support Vector Machine Classifier

Support Vector Machine (SVM) is a supervised classifier similar to the MLC classifier, in that the classifier looks at multidimensional points defined by the band values of each training sample. However, instead of evaluating the maximum likelihood that a pixel belongs to a class cluster, the algorithm defines the multidimensional space in such a way that the gap between class clusters is as large as possible. This divides the space up into different sections separated by gaps. Each pixel is classified where it falls in the divided space.Image Classification Workflow:

With the addition of the Create Accuracy Assessment Points, Update Accuracy Assessment Points, and Compute Confusion Matrix tools in ArcGIS 10.4, it is now possible to both create and assess image classification in ArcMap and ArcGIS Pro.

The general workflow for image classification and assessment in ArcGIS is:
  1. If desired, use the Segment Mean Shift tool to segment your imagery.
  2. Create a training sample using the Image Classification toolbar (if you are using the Iso Cluster classification, you can skip this step).
  3. Use one of the four training tools (Train ISO Cluster Classifier, Train Maximum Likelihood Classifier, Train Random Trees Classifier, Train Support Vector Machine Classifier).
  4. Use the Create Accuracy Assessment Points tool on the classified image to create randomly placed points that have values extracted from the image.
  5. Either use the Update Accuracy Assessment Point tool to compare this classification to previously created classifications, or manually edit the points and visually assess a reference image.
  6. Use the Compute Confusion Matrix tool to create a confusion matrix from the accuracy points.
  7. Use the measures of accuracy (the user’s accuracy, producer's accuracy, and Kappa index) calculated by the confusion matrix to assess the classification. Make changes to the training sample, as needed, to improve the classification.

The best part about this six-step process is that it makes it pretty easy to compare different classification methods, and it’s often important to compare the different methods. Getting your training sites nailed down (step 2) is usually the toughest part, but steps 3 through 7 fly by since the analysis is done for you. In the end, you have several classified raster images to use in your work and can choose the best result based on your personal objectives.

As an example, we used this workflow to classify a Landsat 8 image of the Ventura area in Southern California. We used the MLC, SVM, and Random Trees (RT) methods to classify a single Landsat 8 raster captured on February 15, 2016. We classified the image into nine classes and manually selected training samples and accuracy assessment (“ground truth”) points. Additionally, we used a segmented image as an additional input raster for each classifier. Once we classified the rasters, we computed a confusion matrix for each output to determine the accuracy of the classification when compared to ground truth points. The Kappa index in the Confusion Matrix gives us an overall idea of how accurate each classification method is.

The results showed that each method did pretty well in the classification when looking at the Kappa indexes, as well as based on a visual assessment. In order of accuracy (from the highest Kappa index to the lowest), we see that the SVM output was the most accurate (Kappa = 0.915), followed by Random Trees (Kappa = 0.88) and finally the MLC method (Kappa = 0.846).Confusion-Matrix-1024x186.png

We can see from the Confusion Matrix that some methods did better than others for specific classes. For example, the MLC didn’t do too well with Bare Earth classification, but RT and SVM weren’t too much better. This is great information for honing in on a better-classified image–now we know that we should focus on getting better Bare Earth training samples to improve our results. You could keep going with this until you get a really high accuracy for all classes, if that’s what you need for your analysis. If you need just a general idea of the area, you could just take what you get in Round 1! Check out what we got:

Source image:Source-Image.png

Classified Image:Classified-Image.png

Make sure to check out the new Image Classification Wizard with the release of ArcGIS Pro 1.3!
Julia L. and Rebecca R. - Desktop Support
In 2014, we began My Esri as a one-stop shop for customers, a place for Esri’s global community to manage unique relationships with Esri. My Esri has grown steadily since launch, and we’re happy to announce that the site now includes support! Everything previously available on the legacy My Support site now calls My Esri home, and we’ve added some functionality, as well. Depending on your role within the organization, you can log cases, report bugs, view recent activity, and more.

There are many roles in My Esri, and this blog outlines some workflows and FAQs for of each participant: users, administrators, distributors, and Premium customers. Although we’ve segmented this post by user, the information under “For My Esri Users” contains valuable information for all. Note: If you don’t see the Support tab in My Esri, check out this blog post. If you’d like to know more how to use My Esri beyond what’s covered in this post, please see the Common Questions view in your Dashboard of My Esri (you must have an Esri account to view this page; see Get an Esri Account below). Additionally, you can take a tour of My Esri through the Take a Tour option. For My Esri UsersGet an Esri AccountTo use My Esri, you need an Esri account. To learn how to create an Esri account or to get account help, click here. Connect to an Organization6-21-2016-12-30-35-PM1-283x300.jpgYou can connect to an organization through:
  • Requesting permissions through My Organizations > Request Permissions
  • Contacting your administrator to invite you through token-based authentication or
  • Contacting you administrator to directly connect your username.  
Note: You can connect to multiple organizations in My Esri; follow one of the methods above to connect to an additional organization. Get an Overview of Your Support OrganizationFor a quick snapshot of your organization’s overall support status, check out the Overview page. On this page, you can see case and bug volume, contact information, a brief overview of recent activity, and more. For further detail, visit one of the other pages: Recent Activity, Cases, Bugs, or Authorized Callers.6-21-2016-2-01-44-PM-300x148.jpgView Recent ActivityThrough the Recent Activity subtab, users can get a snapshot of recent activity, including that of bugs and cases. For a more detailed analysis, see the pages for bugs, cases, and so forth. View Case and Bug InformationFor a more in-depth look at cases and bugs beyond what’s shown on the Recent Activity page, please visit the pages for Cases and Bugs, respectively. In these views, you can apply more filters to expedite search, view a specific activity report, and see more metadata related to the bug and/or case. Become an Authorized CallerIf you wish to become an authorized caller, please contact your administrator or navigate to My Organizations > Request Permissions—this will notify the administrator to determine your permissions. As an authorized caller, you can contact Esri through the phone or through My Esri. For Administrators Manage Authorized CallersYou can use the Authorized Callers subtab to add, edit, or delete authorized callers, as well as export the list of authorized callers. If you wish to add an authorized caller who is already part of your organization, navigate to the Authorized Caller page, and click the Add Caller button to elect an authorized caller. For Distributors 6-21-2016-1-25-40-PM-300x270.jpgAccess the Staff Tools MenuAs a distributor, you can review and manage permissions requests for customers with valid or invalid customer numbers. Additionally, you can find a list of all users who are connected to the organization. Note: All international users will be labeled as invalid, as these users are not shown the customer number field when submitting a request.
  • Unless you’re a distributor on Global Support, the Support feature set in My Esri is disabled by default. Once you subscribe to Global Support, you should submit a request to the My Esri team to enable the Support feature set.  
Note: If you are an authorized caller or administrator from a distributor and you wish to request a case or initiate a chat for a child organization, a representative from that child organization must become an authorized caller.Thanks again for your patience and feedback as we tailor your online support experience on this new platform—your efforts further embolden support on My Esri! If you’d like to send us additional questions or comments about Support on My Esri, please click the feedback link found at the bottom of each page on My Esri, or leave a comment on this post.
Megan S. - Online Support Resources 

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