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The lab has just completed a prototype that combines ESRI’s ArcGIS API for Silverlight with the open source Silverlight Augmented Reality Toolkit.

The toolkit allows developers to detect the spatial orientation of a predefined marker.  The lab used the orientation information to overlay a map from ESRI’s ArcGIS API for Silverlight.  As shown in the video, the map is fully functional even with the perspective distortion.

The demonstration starts with the user browsing a default basemap from ESRI’s resource center and then performs a search of GeoEye imagery in New Zealand.  All imagery is tagged with sensor information such as the capture date, percentage cloud cover and satellite position.  In the video, this information is used to order and then offset overlapping imagery.  This effect is useful to quickly find imagery based on specific criteria, for example, find the newest imagery with the least amount of cloud cover.

Finally, why not try this demonstration yourself?  You will need a computer with a webcam.  Click here to start the Augmented Reality web application and here to download and print the marker symbol.Contributed by Richie C.

This week we have four new videos of proof-of-concepts developed on the Microsoft Surface with ESRI’s ArcGIS API for WPF.

ArcPhoto for Microsoft Surface


This application demonstrates how photographs can be automatically downloaded from a camera to the Surface using Bluetooth connectivity and georeferenced.  Georeferencing is the process of assigning a physical real-world position to an object, namely a photograph.  In this demonstration, the photographs were taken using device that included a GPS receiver and could tag photographs with their geographic position.

 

Greenprint Priority for Microsoft Surface


The following demonstration uses the Surface to display a map of an area and instructs a remote mapping server to perform intensive suitability analysis.  The parameters for the analysis are on the right hand side of the screen and the results are displayed on the left.  This demonstrates how the Surface can be used to perform “what if” environmental analysis.

 

Map Analysis with Tagged Objects for Microsoft Surface


This demonstration uses Surface-specific tags as inputs to drive time and viewing geoprocessing operations.  The geoprocessing analysis is being performed on a remote ArcGIS Server.

 

Tag Map Magnifier for Microsoft Surface


The application utilizes Surface-specific tags to act as virtual map magnifiers.  Tags are made up of a collection of domino-like black dots and are uniquely identified by the Surface device.  Developers can retrieve the tag position, identifier code and orientation.

 

The lab used the tags to add an additional Map UIElements to the display.  As the user manipulates the tag, the magnifier map is repositioned and its map extent updated.  The map insets initially have same scale as the base map, a small scrollbar is provided to allow the user to magnify the map (or “zoom in”).

 

Because tags are uniquely identified, if a user removes a tag and then places it back on the table, we are able to restore previous settings such as the map magnifier’s size and relative scale.

 

Contributed by Richie C.

During the 2009 ESRI International User Conference, Jack Dangermond introduced his vision of geographic design or “geodesign”.  Click here to view Jack’s presentation of his geodesign vision.  To assist Jack’s presentation, a few demonstrations were created to help illustrate this vision.  One such demonstration used a Microsoft Surface device to sketch planning areas on an interactive map.

 


This application was developed using the ArcGIS API for WPF by the Applications Prototype Lab.  The base map is from ArcGIS Online and the overlaid suitability maps were sourced from a local ArcGIS Server.  In summary, this application demonstrates the interactivity of a multi-user/multi-touch device for planning and communal design.Contributed by Richie C.

This Surface application is built with ESRI’s ArcGIS API for WPF and references map and geoprocessing services from ArcGIS Server.  Cross country mobility is the name giving to an exercise of determining the most efficient path between two locations.  Depending on the data (and parameters) the end user can find a route that is the fastest, shortest, most fuel efficient, avoids urban areas, flattest or any other condition.

 

 

The first step illustrated in the video is the rating of three geographic layers: slope, vegetation and transportation.  The user can assign a preference to weight one more than others.  For example, slope could be a larger consideration (e.g. if moving heavy equipment) than the vegetation type.  Secondly, items within each layer can also be rated.  For example, the user can indicate that low slope is preferable to steep slopes and that grades great than 40° are “no go” (or impossible to traverse).

 

The next step is to indicate the intended target location for the three flagged vehicles/people/units.  In the demonstration video the target is represented by a bulls-eye button than can dragged into position.

 

After the three geographic layer have been rated and the target placed into position, a request is sent to ArcGIS Server to perform a weighted overlay using the user defined parameters.  The result is a new geographic layer called a cost surface.  A cost surface is like an image where each pixel contains a cost value, that is, the cost for an object to traverse it.

 

The next step, uses the cost surface to find the least cost path from the three flagged objects to the target.

 

The final step is the creation of a cost corridor.  A cost corridor is an area around the least cost path with a plus or minus one, two and three percent variation.  Basically, what alternative path could the three flagged objects take by sacrificing one to three percent cost (in time, money, fuel etc).Contributed by Richie C.

In May 2009, the Applications Prototype Lab published a web application called “Police Dispatcher”.  The application simulated a police dispatch system with real time incidents and the tracking of police vehicles.  The application was built using Silverlight 2 and the ArcGIS API for Silverlight.

 

The police dispatcher demonstration was recently ported to the Microsoft Surface as a Surface application.  Surface applications are similar to standard WPF application except that they target the Surface hardware and include references to a few extra libraries.  The transition was relatively trivial, for example, the application references the ArcGIS API for WPF rather than the ArcGIS API for Silverlight.

 

In the Surface application we took advantage of some the goodness of WPF such as drop shadows and glow bitmap effects.

 

Contributed by Richie C.

This map illustrates (the very impossible, but intellectually exciting) scenario of the Earth standing still.  If the Earth stopped spinning, the only remaining force that could affect our oceans is gravity.  Oceanic water would migrate to the polar regions where the Earth’s gravitation forces are strongest create two large polar oceans.  In a few areas, such as the Gulf of Mexico, the ocean’s water would pool to form giant inland seas.

Following the global ocean shift, a new and enormous continent would form around the equatorial region.  The red line in the image below represents the global divide in hemispherical watersheds of the two great oceans.Contributed by Witold F.

The Applications Prototype Lab at ESRI received a Microsoft Surface a few months ago.  The Surface is a vertical mounted multi-touch (and multi-user) screen.  Below are a list of recent prototypes developed for the Surface using (with one exception) the ArcGIS API for WPF.

GeoEye Imagery Explorer


This video demonstrates an application built for the Microsoft Surface using the ArcGIS API for WPF. Background map content is provided by ArcGIS Online. The application displays footprints from GeoEye's satellite image catalog. The presenter demonstrates how to select and manipulate thumbnails of GeoEye imagery.

 

 

Terrain Profile Computation


This video demonstrates an application built for the Microsoft Surface using the ArcGIS API for WPF. Background map content is provided by ArcGIS Online. This application display the terrain profile of a line drawn by the presenter on the surface. The terrain analysis is done using a remote geoprocessing service hosted by ArcGIS Server.

 

Message in a Bottle

 

This video demonstrates an application built for the Microsoft Surface using the ArcGIS API for WPF. Background map content is provided by ArcGIS Online. When the presenter touches a location on the ocean, a line drawn that displays where a object in the sea would travel in 365 days based on ocean currents. The analysis is being performed by a remote geoprocessing service hosted by ArcGIS Server.

 

ArcGIS Engine Globe Control


This video demonstrations an XNA application build for the Microsoft Surface using the ArcGIS Engine Globe control. The presenter shows how the Surface API has been used to control globe navigation and the use tagged values to change globes appearance or behavior.

 

Drive Time Geoprocessing


This video demonstrates an application built for the Microsoft Surface using the ArcGIS API for WPF. Background map content is provided by ArcGIS Online. When the presenter touches the surface a request is sent a remote server running ArcGIS Server to perform drive time analysis. The results are then returned to (and displayed) on the Surface.

 

CCM Analysis


This video demonstrates an application built for the Microsoft Surface using the ArcGIS API for WPF. In this example, the presenter is showing a geographic operation called "cross country mobility" with the aid of tagged objects. The objects represent parameters of units ability to traverse the cost surface.

 

CalTrans Traffic Viewer


This video demonstrates an application built for the Microsoft Surface using the ArcGIS API for WPF. Background map content is provided by ArcGIS Online. The map displays push pins for CalTrans traffic cameras, when pressed, live camera images are displayed on the Surface.

 

USGS Earthquake GeoRSS Feed


This video demonstrates an application built for the Microsoft Surface using the ArcGIS API for WPF. Background map content is provided by ArcGIS Online. The Surface map is displaying icons for recent earthquakes. The earthquake information is provide by a GeoRSS feed published by the USGS. When the presenter clicks on a earthquake icon, a request is sent to a remote geoprocessing service running on ArcGIS Server. The service returns the number of people within a hundred miles radio of the earthquake.

 

ArcGIS Online


This video demonstrates an application built for the Microsoft Surface using the ArcGIS API for WPF. Background map content is provided by ArcGIS Online. The presenter shows how the multi-touch surface can be used to navigate around the map. The presenter also shows an innovative "virtual magnifying glass" for revealing more detail.

 

Contributed by John G.

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