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2019

For those new to this series, "This Week's Picks" is a (loosely) biweekly blog where I share some of my favorite ArcGIS Online content with you.

 

If you are interested in earlier posts, they’re archived here: This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online: Archive 

 

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There is a chance that if you’re reading this, you might have contacted Esri Technical Support before and spoken or emailed with one of my colleagues. It goes without saying that Esri Support Analysts are wizards at solving technical problems involving GIS, but what some folks don’t know is that they are also the engine behind the Support site’s Knowledge Base (KB). 

 

That’s why this week I want to highlight three new(ish) Technical Support-written Knowledge Base articles that get into some lesser-known ArcGIS API for Python and Arcade functionality.

 

Clone Hosted Feature Services between ArcGIS Online Organizations

 

“The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry…” and suddenly, it’s a requirement to transfer Hosted Feature Layers, Web Maps, Apps and maybe even surveys and dashboards to a different ArcGIS Online organization. This would be a daunting task, but the ArcGIS API for Python’s Clone Items method makes it easier. This KB article (written by yours truly, I know - shameless plug) provides a Jupyter Notebook and standalone Python script code sample to get you started. 

 

Additional References:

 

 

Automate ArcGIS Online Hosted Feature Service Downloads

 

Unintentionally overwriting a layer or accidentally deleting a Hosted Feature Service are mistakes that many of us have made in ArcGIS Online. With the ArcGIS API for Python, it is possible to automate local backups of your Hosted Feature Services for when these situations unexpectedly come up. See the code sample in Munachiso Ogbuchiekwe's KB article.

 

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Step-by-Step: Calculate a Field in ArcGIS Online with Arcade

 

In This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online #3, I highlighted Arcade resources focused on pop-ups, symbology and labeling. To round things out, Hanushrie Gopalkrishnan's support KB article demonstrates how to use a simple expression to calculate a field based on the values of two existing fields. 

 

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I hope the above KB articles provided some helpful tips on the ArcGIS API for Python and Arcade! Let me know in the comments below if there are any outstanding questions. Thanks for reading and stay tuned for This Week's Picks – ArcGIS Enterprise and This Week's Picks – ArcGIS Pro

 

If you're interested, I'd love to connect on LinkedIn. You can follow me on Twitter, too. I regularly post / tweet GIS(ish) content to these platforms.

 

Happy holidays and see you in 2020!

-Peter

For those new to this series, "This Week's Picks" is a (loosely) biweekly blog where I share some of my favorite ArcGIS Online content with you.

 

If you are interested in earlier posts, they’re archived here: This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online: Archive 

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Thanksgiving weekend had me thinking a lot about sharing. We share a meal; we share time with family and friends; we create shared memories and history together.

 

With sharing on the mind, the sheer number of hours I spend in ArcGIS Online meant it was only a matter of time before I began thinking about sharing data, maps and apps, and the powerful messages and stories that can be conveyed to a lot of people when these items are shared with the public.

 

However, there are some factors to think about before making your items accessible to everyone.  

 

The following resources describe best practices for layer and Web Map configuration for publicly shared items, discuss the nuances among public sharing options, and provide some suggestions for generating the most possible interest in your public maps.

 

An important note before the picks: It is the responsibility of anyone sharing layers, maps and apps publicly to check the data to make sure that nobody's private information is included. 

 

Blog: Prepare Content for Public Sharing

Important elements to consider before sharing items publicly include access to the content, accessibility, and the end goal of the map or app. My colleague Madison recently published an outstanding blog going through four crucial questions that help address the above aspects. My favorite passage: “Members of the public never have access to delete your maps and apps, but mistakes can happen in an organization with many members who have content administration privileges… for this reason, we recommend enabling delete protection for all content shared publicly (layers, web maps, and apps). Deleting web maps or apps is a permanent action that cannot be undone.”

 

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Video: Prepare Content for Sharing with the Public

Take a closer technical look into some of the concepts that Madison presents through the ArcGIS Online team’s video demo, recorded at the 2018 Developer Summit. Specifically, there is a side-by-side comparison of Feature Layer and Tile Layer performance for public-facing applications, as well as the full workflow of enabling subscriber and premium content in a configurable app, a Web AppBuilder app, and a Story Map.

Additional References

 

 

Blog: Captivate Your Audience with Apps

Creating a configurable app from your Web Map is a quick, straightforward way to provide a focused user experience for a public audience. This blog covers some templates that are great for public sharing, the importance of well-configured pop-ups, and organization branding. Quotable line: “Configurable apps in ArcGIS Online turn your web maps into shareable and presentable information products.”

 

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I hope the above picks provided some helpful tips on sharing items publicly! Let me know in the comments below if there are any outstanding questions. Thanks for reading and stay tuned for This Week's Picks – ArcGIS Enterprise & This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Pro!

 

If you're interested, I'd love to connect on LinkedIn. You can follow me on Twitter, too. I regularly post / tweet GIS(ish) content to these platforms.

-Peter