Skip navigation
All Places > GIS > Enterprise GIS > ArcGIS Enterprise > Blog > Author: JEdstrom-esristaff

ArcGIS Enterprise

11 Posts authored by: JEdstrom-esristaff Employee

As you may have heard, due to the continuously evolving circumstances around COVID-19, last week’s Esri Developer Summit plenary was held in front of an empty audience.  If you missed the Livestream of the plenary, do not worry - it can all be found here.  And, better yet, the focus of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise is the Dev Summit Plenary Highlights.  The highlights included:

1. Big data analysis using GeoAnalytics Tools

2. Use raster analytics and the ArcGIS API for Python to monitor coral bleaching

3. Automation comes to ArcGIS Notebooks

 

This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise #11 banner

 

 1. Big data analysis using GeoAnalytics Tools

Sarah's demo at the plenary covered how, using Apache Spark, GeoAnalytics performs parallel analysis to analyze vector and tabular datasets in both ArcGIS Enterprise and ArcGIS Pro.  Without Spark, each tool has to be executed separately; with Spark, a function can be written to chain multiple tools together.   With the run_python_script tool, Sarah’s workflows can be streamed across ArcGIS GeoAnalytics Server.  Read more for yourself here.  As a bonus, check out the related video here.

 

2. Use raster analytics and the ArcGIS API for Python to monitor coral bleaching

Vinay’s ArcGIS Image Server plenary demo covered how analysis tools in raster analytics can process multidimensional data.  Utilizing both Notebooks and the ArcGIS API for Python, he created a model that helped illustrate and comprehend the impact of sea surface temperature on coral bleaching.  These tools empower users to build custom applications and automate their raster workflows.  Check it out for yourself in this blog and this video

 

3. Automation comes to ArcGIS Notebooks

Automating tasks can make life easier for ArcGIS Enterprise administrators.  At the Dev Summit plenary, Jay spoke of three types of automation: simple, advanced, and intelligent.  As this blog mentions, it is important for organizations to understand and consider these types of automation so that they can make the best decisions for their organizations.  Starting with ArcGIS Enterprise 10.8, ArcGIS Notebooks have an "Execute Notebook" option.  This option allows administrators to automate notebook execution – to run an existing notebook without manually accessing the notebook.  Read more about this for yourself here.  To see the demo for yourself, watch the video here

Thanks for keeping an eye out for This Week's Picks!  And, as always, thank you for reading and please feel free to reach out in the comments below 
 if there are any outstanding questions, comments, or suggestions for future topics.  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

Get excited, the focus of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise is all things 10.8!  For those who missed it, ArcGIS Enterprise 10.8 released last month on February 20th.  And while we can't cover everything in the 10.8 release in this edition of This Week's Picks, what we'll be doing an overview of the new functionality.

1. Overview of What's New in 10.8

2. What's New in 10.8 Portal Administration

3. What's New in 10.8 Data and Publishing

 

This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise #10 banner

 

1. Overview of What's New in 10.8

Want an overview of the 10.8 highlights? Check out this video put out by me and my fellow Product Advocacy Lead, Peter. I'll be the first to admit, we had a blast making it, but we also made a point to cover what we consider to be the top new features and functionality in this release: user type extensions, data store items, new group settings, read-only mode for the ArcGIS Enterprise portal, an information banner, hosted map image layers, and vector tile enhancements.  Watch it for yourself here.

 

And, as an added bonus (or if watching videos just isn't your favorite thing to do), take a moment to check out this blog that also covers what's new in 10.8.

 

2. What's New in 10.8 Portal Administration

With an overview of what's new covered, we can shift our focus to new functionality in specific aspects of ArcGIS Enterprise…  We'll be starting with ArcGIS Enterprise portal administrators.  They tend to have a lot of responsibility, comprised of tasks both big and small.  With each release, the product introduces new functionality to make these tasks simpler.  New features in 10.8 that do just this include the access notice, information banner, and new group capabilities. Jeffrey and Marley's blog does a deep dive on these new features, including what they are and how to configure them within your own Enterprise portal.  Take a look for yourself here.

 

3. What's New in 10.8 Data and Publishing

10.8 has brought a lot of new functionality to data and publishing. This blog goes into the top five new data and publishing related features, including creating data store items, using field descriptions and field value types to provide context about your data, working with auto-calculate length and area values, and publishing hosted map image layers, and other enhancements.  Hilary's blog goes into not only what the functionality is but also when it could be useful for you to implement.  Read more for yourself here.

Hope you're all as excited about 10.8 as I am!  As always, thanks for keeping an eye out for This Week's Picks.  Please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions, comments, or suggestions for future topics.  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

It's time for This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.  As you may know, within ArcGIS Enterprise, ArcGIS Server can be licensed for a variety of different roles.  There is of course ArcGIS GIS Server, necessary to deploy a hosting server in your base ArcGIS Enterprise deployment, but there's also:

  • ArcGIS Image Server
  • ArcGIS GeoEvent Server
  • ArcGIS GeoAnalytics Server
  • ArcGIS Notebook Server
  • ArcGIS Business Analyst Server

 

Each role has its own unique capabilities.  Instead of just describing the capabilities of each, we're going to take a look at specific examples of ArcGIS GeoEvent Server, ArcGIS GeoAnalytics Server, and ArcGIS Notebook Server.  It doesn't matter if you've only ever used a base deployment of ArcGIS Enterprise or if you've only ever used ArcGIS Enterprise for analyzing your big datasets…  After reading this edition of This Week's Picks, you'll be thinking, Wow, ArcGIS Enterprise can do that?

 

We’ll be covering:

1. Dynamic geofence synchronization in GeoEvent Server

2. Detecting Water Utility Leaks with GeoAnalytics Server

3. What is ArcGIS Notebook Server?

 

This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise #9 banner

 

1. Dynamic geofence synchronization in GeoEvent Server

This blog explores the concept of geofences -  a location-based concept that is set up so that when A occurs within a boundary, B is triggered.  For example, when a moose wearing a GPS collar walks into a park boundary, the local wildlife department gets an email notification.  These boundaries, such as a park's border, are typically static.  “Typically” is the keyword there – sometimes the boundaries are dynamic.  Think about boundaries that change; a meteorologist might need to track wind speeds within a moving hurricane.  Never to fear, GeoEvent can accommodate both static and dynamic boundaries.  This blog describes the workflow in order to do this, provides demo data, and a video to go through it step by step.  Check it out for yourself here.

 

2. Detecting Water Utility Leaks with GeoAnalytics Server

This blog explores how a data analysis workflow for a water utility enables the organization to make better business decisions and improve operations.  It starts with creating a space time cube in ArcGIS Pro, filtering the results, taking a look at trends through ArcGIS Pro's emerging hot spots tool, and then joining features.  This concept is not just relevant to water utilities though; GeoAnalytics can help out any organization that needs to process, analyze, and understand their larger data sets faster.  Read more for yourself in this blog here.

 

3. What is ArcGIS Notebook Server?

Released in ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7, ArcGIS Notebooks leverage ArcGIS Notebook Server by providing a Jupyter notebook environment in ArcGIS Enterprise.  Once set up and licensed, ArcGIS Notebooks allows for you to run analysis and build models right within your GIS system of record.  It's not just for data science - you can use ArcGIS Notebooks to clean up portal items or notify web map authors of broken links.  The best thing is that you can share these notebooks with others; once you have your notebook configured, you can distribute them - allowing for not only transparency but also reproducibility.  Take a look at this blog for more details.


Thanks for reading This Week's Picks!  As always, please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions, comments, or suggestions for future topics.  I'd love to hear from you!  And be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

Welcome back to This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise!  In past editions, we've been focusing on ArcGIS Enterprise: the product but haven't gotten into ArcGIS Enterprise: the backbone of your GIS workflows.  In many organizations, ArcGIS Enterprise is integrated with other components of the ArcGIS platform - including ArcGIS Pro, ArcGIS Online, and Esri's suite of essential, field, and office apps.  All of these have unique considerations to keep in mind when working with ArcGIS Enterprise.

 

That said, the focus of this edition of This Week's Picks is ArcGIS Enterprise and field apps.  We'll be diving deeper into this topic by looking into:

1.  ArcGIS Secure Mobile Implementation Patterns

2.  Troubleshooting connecting to ArcGIS Enterprise on your iOS device

3.  Disconnected Editing with Collector for ArcGIS and ArcGIS Enterprise

 

This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise #8 banner

 

1. ArcGIS Secure Mobile Implementation Patterns

This whitepaper is a great resource that acknowledges that, in recent years, the transition from office-based to field-based GIS workflows has forced IT architects to be strategic in deploying an effective enterprise GIS strategy.  It goes into almost all possible WebGIS deployment patterns, as well as considerations for different field apps.  Whether setting up your environment for the first time or wanting to see where your deployment fits in, this whitepaper is worth checking out - take a look for yourself here.

 

2. Troubleshooting connecting to ArcGIS Enterprise on your iOS device

In later versions of iOS, an issue can arise when connecting to your ArcGIS Enterprise portal if you aren't using a valid certificate; this error is particularly common if you're using a self-signed certificate.  While self-signed certificates aren't designed for production use, they can be great for internal testing.  So, how do you get around this error?  This technical article from Support describes the solution and, while written with Collector for ArcGIS in mind, the steps are helpful when connecting ArcGIS Enterprise to any Esri field app.  For the exact workflow, look at the steps outlined here.

 

3. Disconnected Editing with Collector for ArcGIS and ArcGIS Enterprise

The focus of this Esri Canada video is using Collector for ArcGIS for offline editing of a feature service, coming from a registered enterprise geodatabase, in ArcGIS Enterprise.  It breaks down the workflow step by step, from feature class creation to data collection and syncing, and also covers important considerations start to finish.  Even if you know this workflow by heart, this short video is a great refresher - be sure to check it out for yourself here.

 

And these are just some of the considerations to have in mind when using field apps with ArcGIS Enterprise!

Thanks for keeping an eye out for This Week's Picks!  And, as always, thank you for reading and please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions, comments, or suggestions for future topics.  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

Get excited - the focus of this edition of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise is migrations.  Now the word "migration" can be ambiguous, as it's thrown around in a variety of contexts: migrating from on-premise to the cloud, migrating from 10.5.1 to 10.7.1, migrating from one form of WebGIS deployment strategy to another, etc.  Those are all valid examples of migration, but they are not the only examples of migration.

To clear up any confusion, the focus of this blog is two types of migration: migrating from ArcGIS Server to ArcGIS Enterprise and migrating ArcGIS Enterprise to a new machine.  Now that we're all on the same page, we're going to be going through these two types of migrations by covering:

1. Migrating to ArcGIS Enterprise

2. Migrating ArcGIS Enterprise to a new machine, using the Join Site operation

3. Migrating ArcGIS Enterprise to a new machine, using the WebGIS DR tool

 

 

This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise #7 banner


1. Migrating to ArcGIS Enterprise

This comprehensive video from Esri Australia provides a great list of considerations when making the move to ArcGIS Enterprise from another type of WebGIS deployment, such as a standalone ArcGIS Server site.  The considerations they bring to light include thinking about your hardware if the cloud should be used, potential monitoring and backups, the need for SSL certificates, and more.  This is a great resource for anybody looking to migrate to ArcGIS Enterprise or explore a deployment’s capabilities.  Take a look for yourself here.
 

2. Migrating ArcGIS Enterprise to a new machine, using the Join Site operation

This blog is a wonderful resource for those already using ArcGIS Enterprise and wanting to move their deployment to another machine (this could be due to the new machine having more available resources or a newer operating system).  There are many different choices you can choose when migrating ArcGIS Enterprise to a new machine.  This blog covers the use of the Join Site operation, typically used to add standby machines for highly available deployments and disaster recovery workflows.  Outlining the steps of this migration workflow, including sections specific to each ArcGIS Enterprise component, this blog is a must-read for anybody looking to migrate their ArcGIS Enterprise site using the Join Site operation.  Read more here in this blog.

 

3. Migrating ArcGIS Enterprise to a new machine, using the WebGIS DR tool
Building on what was discussed in the previous blog, this blog covers a second option for migrating your ArcGIS Enterprise deployment to another machine: the WebGIS DR tool. While this utility exists to create and restore backups and maintain a replicated standby environment for disaster recovery, it can also be used to migrate our ArcGIS Enterprise environments. While more complicated than the Join Site operation discussed in the previous blog, this WebGIS DR tool has the option for you to validate whether the migration was successful before switching to the new environment.  For more details on this workflow, as well as pros and cons, take a look at this blog here.

 

With that, hopefully, you are feeling more confident about migrating to ArcGIS Enterprise and migrating ArcGIS Enterprise deployments to different machines.  As always, thank you for reading and please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions or comments.  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

Happy New Year, fellow ArcGIS Enterprise aficionados!  Moving into a new year, and a new decade, the subject of time has been on my mind… Of course, thinking about how much has changed in the past ten years.  And traveling for the holidays made me think a lot about time zones.  And this led me to think about web maps and time in ArcGIS Enterprise.  Seriously.  I'm a self-proclaimed geography nerd, I love this stuff.

 

Time in ArcGIS Enterprise is a bit of mystery, even for those who consider us who consider ourselves familiar with the product.  With that in mind, let's remove the mystery and focus on time in ArcGIS Enterprise for the first edition of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise in 2020.  We'll be covering:

  1. Date and Time in ArcGIS Online (and ArcGIS Enterprise!)
  2. Visualizing time in your web maps with Arcade
  3. How to set your web service to use a specific time zone instead of UTC
      
    This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise #6 banner

 

1. Date and Time in ArcGIS Online (and ArcGIS Enterprise!)

This video by my fellow Product Advocacy Lead, Peter Klingman, is an awesome two-minute crash course on time zones, UTC and Unix time, and how this all works with ArcGIS Online. And don't let the name of this video deter you, though ArcGIS Online is the only product mentioned, the same principles apply to ArcGIS Enterprise.  By the end of this video, you'll be able to answer why the time in your web map in California is different than the time for your buddy viewing the same web map in across the world in Germany.  Take a moment and watch it for yourself here.

 

2. Visualizing time in your web maps with Arcade
Now you now understand how time works in ArcGIS Enterprise; you know that all dates are recorded and returned in UTC.  But even with that information in mind, sometimes that's not enough and you need the time in your web map to display a specific way, reflecting a particular time zone.  With that in mind, Arcade can be your best friend and help you convey the information you need to in your web maps.  Take a look at this blog, which goes into use cases and workflows to make this happen.

 

3. How to set your web service to use a specific time zone instead of UTC
This whole time we've been talking about time in ArcGIS Enterprise, with principles that apply to ArcGIS Online as well. When navigating time, using Arcade within your web map may not be enough, maybe you want to set some rules on the web service itself.  And this is where ArcGIS Enterprise offers you more time capabilities: you can set your web service to use a specific time zone instead of UTC.  This can be done by specifying the time zone used in the database or through ArcGIS Server.  This technical article goes into detail about changing these properties for the web service itself, always displaying the results in the desired time zone instead of UTC.

 

And with that, hopefully, time in ArcGIS Enterprise has been demystified for you!  Thank you for reading and, as always, please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions.  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

Welcome to the final edition of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise for 2019!
 

Setting up your ArcGIS Enterprise deployment is a potentially daunting task.  Even if you already have ArcGIS Enterprise up and running, there are some considerations to keep everything running smoothly.  But that too can be a daunting task…  What's an ArcGIS Enterprise administrator to do?

 

Get some deployment strategies up your sleeve, that's what!  To do this, let's set ourselves up with those deployment strategies by covering the following topics:

  1. Architecting Your Deployment
  2. Designing Your ArcGIS Backup Strategy
  3. Backing Up Your ArcGIS Data Store + Disk Space

This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise #5 banner


1. Architecting Your Deployment

This whitepaper is a resource that breaks down all the factors to consider when setting up your ArcGIS Enterprise deployment.  It doesn't just cover the technical details but factors specific to your organization: What capabilities do you require?  How many users do you have?  What is your service-level agreement?  Scaling, expanding upon the typical base deployment, and highly available deployments are defined and discussed in order to guide you towards the best decision for you and organization.   And, lastly, you'll find the best piece of advice that any good Enterprise administrator (or Hitchhikers fan) knows: don't panic.  Check it out for yourself here.
  

2. Designing Your ArcGIS Backup Strategy

Once ArcGIS Enterprise is deployed to meet your organization's needs, that's it - right?  Not so fast.  This blog covers the other half of the deployment strategy: designing your ArcGIS backup plan.  There are many reasons to backup your ArcGIS Enterprise deployment: power loss, machine crash, natural disaster, etc.  Life can sometimes be unpredictable.  And while there are quite a few ways one could possibly go about a backup plan, the WebGIS DR tool is the Esri backup solution.  This blog covers what this ArcGIS Enterprise tool does as well as what to consider when backing up your environment.  Take a look at this blog for more information.

3. Backing Up Your ArcGIS Data Store + Disk Space
As mentioned in the previous blog, disk space is something to consider when evaluating your backup strategy. Depending on your strategy, you may need to be cognizant of the disk space associated with your ArcGIS Data Store.  If running out of space, this Support technical article covers how to change the backup frequency for something that works for your organization.  A second thing to consider is the backup location, which may need to be changed - this is elaborated on further in this related technical article.

 

And now you have some of the deployment strategies to keep up your sleeve!  Please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions. As always, thanks for reading!  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.  Have yourself a happy holiday season, Enterprise friends!

Welcome to the fourth round of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise!  This week we're going to be focusing on publishing errors.  This topic may be thought of as taboo by some but, if you've been using ArcGIS Enterprise long enough, you've probably encountered some publishing errors along the way.  And that's okay because they're often easily fixed, meaning you can be on your merry publishing way.

 

With that in mind, we're going to talk about some of the most "popular" errors - and their fixes.

  1. "Packaging succeeded, but publishing failed"
  2. "Failed to create the service"
  3. "Failed to extract manifest from uploaded service definition" + "Failed to get basic item metadata for service definition upload"

 

  

1. "Packaging succeeded, but publishing failed"

This blog references this infamous error encountered in ArcMap and presents a comprehensive list of ways to troubleshoot the issue: check the logs, GIS Server connection, Publishing Tools, machine resources, and permissions. Even if you're encountering publishing errors in another client, such as ArcGIS Pro, keep this list in your back pocket because it will still be helpful.  Check out the details of this comprehensive troubleshooting list here.  

 

2. "Failed to create the service"

This technical article on "ERROR 001369: Failed to Create the Service" builds upon the previous blog. Not only does it go into checking the logs, Publishing Tools, machine resources, and permissions - it also covers tuning and configuring services and Opportunistic Locking (OpLocks).  Even if you aren't encountering a publishing error, there are some tips in this technical article that will keep your environment running smoothly.  Check it out for yourself here.

 

3. "Failed to extract manifest from uploaded service definition" + "Failed to get basic item metadata for service definition upload"

This technical article focuses on errors that occur when publishing a hosted feature layer to ArcGIS Enterprise. Both these errors can be caused by one of two things.  One possible cause is that the ArcGIS Enterprise components are not able to communicate through the established SSL protocols.  The second possible cause is that the account running ArcGIS Server's Temp folder is inaccessible.  Look at this article here to read up on how to fix these errors.

 

Hopefully that helps provide some insight into troubleshooting the popular ArcGIS Enterprise publishing errors.  Please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions.  As always, thanks for reading!  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

Happy GIS Day, ArcGIS Enterprise enthusiasts!  For the third round of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise, we're going  to be focusing on following buzzwords:

  1. Federation.
  2. Collaboration.
  3. Shared instances.

 

These are buzzwords that we hear all the time in the Enterprise world and, even if you know what these words mean, we're going to take a deeper dive by looking into content that not only explains the jargon but why it is significant to those who work with ArcGIS Enterprise.  With that in mind, let's dive right in!

 

 

1. Federation.

When federation was first introduced as a concept in the days of just ArcGIS Server and Portal for ArcGIS (pre-ArcGIS Enterprise days), I honestly thought it was this intense IT workflow that you may or may not have success with.  Taking the time to learn about it though, I learned that federation isn't scary at all.  Federation just means that Portal for ArcGIS takes over ArcGIS Server's security.  When this takes place, there also can be some gotchas - such as all items will now be owned by the user who set up the federation.  This blog by our friends at Esri Canada goes into more detail, including how to federate, so check it out for yourself here.

 

2. Collaboration.

This is something my colleague, Peter Klingman, covered not too long in the ArcGIS Online space but I want to bring it up again because collaboration is one of those phrases that users may understand at a high level but may not be clear on the details.  Introduced in ArcGIS Enterprise 10.5.1, distributed collaboration allows for you to connect and integrate your GIS across a network of participants by sharing content - either between ArcGIS Enterprise and ArcGIS Online or two different ArcGIS Enterprise instances.  With distributed collaboration comes some even more buzzwords: host, guest, workspace, synchronization - the list goes on!  While it can be daunting, this Esri Canada video breaks it down; check it out here.

 

3. Shared instances.

Introduced in ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7, shared instances often come up as a solution to those experiencing performance-related issues. Shared instances could be a great solution to your performance conundrum but they're of no use to you if you don't know what they are, how, or even if you should implement them in your ArcGIS Enterprise deployment.  The elevator pitch is that shared instances allow for multiple web services to share resources (ArcSOCs) on the ArcGIS Server machine.  But take a look for yourself by reading Scott M. MacDonald's blog here.

 

Hopefully that helped provide some insight into those Enterprise heavy buzzwords.  Please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions  As always, thanks for reading and be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for the next ArcGIS Enterprise installment coming on Wednesday, December 4th.

Welcome back to This Week's Picks – ArcGIS Enterprise!  This week we're going to focus on some content that'll make your life even easier with ArcGIS Enterprise.  Here are the questions we'll be answering:

1. How do I deploy ArcGIS Enterprise in AWS?  It seems rather intimidating.

2. Switching services to use the shared instance pool, simply with Python.

3. I need to make sure all feature classes in my enterprise geodatabase are available as feature layers for my users. Is there an easy way to make sure this happens?

 

October302019

 

1. How do I deploy ArcGIS Enterprise in AWS?  It seems rather intimidating.
Deploying your first ArcGIS Enterprise instance in Amazon Web Services (AWS) may sound intimidating but it doesn't have to be.  Using the ArcGIS Enterprise Cloud Builder for AWS provides an interface for you to deploy ArcGIS Enterprise so you don't need to use Command Prompt or a script (though that's always an option!).  To learn more about this process, take a look at this blog.

2. How do I switch my services to use the shared instance pool without having to go through each individual service?
For those using ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7 and later, shared instances can help alleviate some of the resource pressure in your ArcGIS Server environment.  This is a setting that can be configured for each individual service through ArcGIS Server Manager.  If you only have one compatible service that you want to use the shared instance pool, it isn't too much work to make the switch.  But if you have tens or hundreds of compatible services, this can be potentially tedious.  To avoid such tedium, consider using Python, as explained further here in this blog.

3. I need to make sure all feature classes in my enterprise geodatabase are available as feature layers for my users.  Is there an easy way to make sure this happens?
If you're using ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7.1, you're in luck!  This release introduced bulk publishing (sometimes referred to "batch publishing"), where you register your database as a data store item in the Enterprise portal. Map image layers and feature layers are published from this data store connection.  You'll also find an option to sync the layers, meaning your existing services will be updated and new feature classes will be published as services.  For more details on this new functionality, take a look at this blog.

 

Thanks for reading, fellow ArcGIS Enterprise groupies!  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for the next ArcGIS Enterprise installment coming on Wednesday, November 13th.

As part of the Product Advocacy team here at Esri, I'm excited to introduce this completely unofficial recurring GeoNet post: This Week’s Picks.  As Product Advocacy Leads, we are continuously coming across informative, interesting, and inspiring content.  Through This Week's Picks, we hope to quickly share some of our favorites with you.

 

 

In This Week's Picks – ArcGIS Enterprise, I want to focus on three pieces of content that answer some of the questions I was asked by customers at the UC this past summer.  I know they can't be the only ones wanting to know the answers, so let's share the knowledge by answering these questions!

1. What does it mean to have my data user managed versus ArcGIS managed?

2. Should I move my GIS to the cloud?

3. What type of security should I use when setting up ArcGIS Enterprise?

 

1.  What does it mean to have my data user managed versus ArcGIS managed?

Data can be handled two ways in the ArcGIS platform: it can be either user managed or ArcGIS managed. Oftentimes this concept comes up in passing, whether on a Support call, GeoNet, in training, or in the middle of a Professional Services engagement.  This can leave users stumped.  Not only are they sometimes not sure which type of data management their organization is using, they're not sure if what they're doing is right.  Answer this question for yourself by taking a look at this whitepaper.

 

2. Should I move my GIS to the cloud?
More and more organizations are trying to answer this question as cloud computing has some advantages over on-premise deployments. These advantages include scalability, agility, and cost-efficiency.  This article covers assessing your current infrastructure in order to make sure you make the best choice for your organization; check it out here 

 

3. What type of security should I use when setting up ArcGIS Enterprise?
While anybody can read the documentation to see the security options available with ArcGIS Enterprise, this video takes it a step further by covering configuring SSL, different ArcGIS Enterprise identity stores, and best practices so that ArcGIS Enterprise meets your organization’s security requirements.  See what your security options are by checking out this video.

 

 

Thanks for reading, fellow ArcGIS Enterprise fans!  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for the next ArcGIS Enterprise installment coming on Wednesday, October 30th.