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ArcGIS Enterprise

3 Posts authored by: JEdstrom-esristaff Employee

Happy GIS Day, ArcGIS Enterprise enthusiasts!  For the third round of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise, we're going  to be focusing on following buzzwords:

  1. Federation.
  2. Collaboration.
  3. Shared instances.

 

These are buzzwords that we hear all the time in the Enterprise world and, even if you know what these words mean, we're going to take a deeper dive by looking into content that not only explains the jargon but why it is significant to those who work with ArcGIS Enterprise.  With that in mind, let's dive right in!

 

 

1. Federation.

When federation was first introduced as a concept in the days of just ArcGIS Server and Portal for ArcGIS (pre-ArcGIS Enterprise days), I honestly thought it was this intense IT workflow that you may or may not have success with.  Taking the time to learn about it though, I learned that federation isn't scary at all.  Federation just means that Portal for ArcGIS takes over ArcGIS Server's security.  When this takes place, there also can be some gotchas - such as all items will now be owned by the user who set up the federation.  This blog by our friends at Esri Canada goes into more detail, including how to federate, so check it out for yourself here.

 

2. Collaboration.

This is something my colleague, Peter Klingman, covered not too long in the ArcGIS Online space but I want to bring it up again because collaboration is one of those phrases that users may understand at a high level but may not be clear on the details.  Introduced in ArcGIS Enterprise 10.5.1, distributed collaboration allows for you to connect and integrate your GIS across a network of participants by sharing content - either between ArcGIS Enterprise and ArcGIS Online or two different ArcGIS Enterprise instances.  With distributed collaboration comes some even more buzzwords: host, guest, workspace, synchronization - the list goes on!  While it can be daunting, this Esri Canada video breaks it down; check it out here.

 

3. Shared instances.

Introduced in ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7, shared instances often come up as a solution to those experiencing performance-related issues. Shared instances could be a great solution to your performance conundrum but they're of no use to you if you don't know what they are, how, or even if you should implement them in your ArcGIS Enterprise deployment.  The elevator pitch is that shared instances allow for multiple web services to share resources (ArcSOCs) on the ArcGIS Server machine.  But take a look for yourself by reading Scott M. MacDonald's blog here.

 

Hopefully that helped provide some insight into those Enterprise heavy buzzwords.  Please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions  As always, thanks for reading and be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for the next ArcGIS Enterprise installment coming on Wednesday, December 4th.

Welcome back to This Week's Picks – ArcGIS Enterprise!  This week we're going to focus on some content that'll make your life even easier with ArcGIS Enterprise.  Here are the questions we'll be answering:

1. How do I deploy ArcGIS Enterprise in AWS?  It seems rather intimidating.

2. Switching services to use the shared instance pool, simply with Python.

3. I need to make sure all feature classes in my enterprise geodatabase are available as feature layers for my users. Is there an easy way to make sure this happens?

 

October302019

 

1. How do I deploy ArcGIS Enterprise in AWS?  It seems rather intimidating.
Deploying your first ArcGIS Enterprise instance in Amazon Web Services (AWS) may sound intimidating but it doesn't have to be.  Using the ArcGIS Enterprise Cloud Builder for AWS provides an interface for you to deploy ArcGIS Enterprise so you don't need to use Command Prompt or a script (though that's always an option!).  To learn more about this process, take a look at this blog.

2. How do I switch my services to use the shared instance pool without having to go through each individual service?
For those using ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7 and later, shared instances can help alleviate some of the resource pressure in your ArcGIS Server environment.  This is a setting that can be configured for each individual service through ArcGIS Server Manager.  If you only have one compatible service that you want to use the shared instance pool, it isn't too much work to make the switch.  But if you have tens or hundreds of compatible services, this can be potentially tedious.  To avoid such tedium, consider using Python, as explained further here in this blog.

3. I need to make sure all feature classes in my enterprise geodatabase are available as feature layers for my users.  Is there an easy way to make sure this happens?
If you're using ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7.1, you're in luck!  This release introduced bulk publishing (sometimes referred to "batch publishing"), where you register your database as a data store item in the Enterprise portal. Map image layers and feature layers are published from this data store connection.  You'll also find an option to sync the layers, meaning your existing services will be updated and new feature classes will be published as services.  For more details on this new functionality, take a look at this blog.

 

Thanks for reading, fellow ArcGIS Enterprise groupies!  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for the next ArcGIS Enterprise installment coming on Wednesday, November 13th.

As part of the Product Advocacy team here at Esri, I'm excited to introduce this completely unofficial recurring GeoNet post: This Week’s Picks.  As Product Advocacy Leads, we are continuously coming across informative, interesting, and inspiring content.  Through This Week's Picks, we hope to quickly share some of our favorites with you.

 

 

In This Week's Picks – ArcGIS Enterprise, I want to focus on three pieces of content that answer some of the questions I was asked by customers at the UC this past summer.  I know they can't be the only ones wanting to know the answers, so let's share the knowledge by answering these questions!

1. What does it mean to have my data user managed versus ArcGIS managed?

2. Should I move my GIS to the cloud?

3. What type of security should I use when setting up ArcGIS Enterprise?

 

1.  What does it mean to have my data user managed versus ArcGIS managed?

Data can be handled two ways in the ArcGIS platform: it can be either user managed or ArcGIS managed. Oftentimes this concept comes up in passing, whether on a Support call, GeoNet, in training, or in the middle of a Professional Services engagement.  This can leave users stumped.  Not only are they sometimes not sure which type of data management their organization is using, they're not sure if what they're doing is right.  Answer this question for yourself by taking a look at this whitepaper.

 

2. Should I move my GIS to the cloud?
More and more organizations are trying to answer this question as cloud computing has some advantages over on-premise deployments. These advantages include scalability, agility, and cost-efficiency.  This article covers assessing your current infrastructure in order to make sure you make the best choice for your organization; check it out here 

 

3. What type of security should I use when setting up ArcGIS Enterprise?
While anybody can read the documentation to see the security options available with ArcGIS Enterprise, this video takes it a step further by covering configuring SSL, different ArcGIS Enterprise identity stores, and best practices so that ArcGIS Enterprise meets your organization’s security requirements.  See what your security options are by checking out this video.

 

 

Thanks for reading, fellow ArcGIS Enterprise fans!  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for the next ArcGIS Enterprise installment coming on Wednesday, October 30th.