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ArcGIS Enterprise

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Welcome to the fourth round of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise!  This week we're going to be focusing on publishing errors.  This topic may be thought of as taboo by some but, if you've been using ArcGIS Enterprise long enough, you've probably encountered some publishing errors along the way.  And that's okay because they're often easily fixed, meaning you can be on your merry publishing way.

 

With that in mind, we're going to talk about some of the most "popular" errors - and their fixes.

  1. "Packaging succeeded, but publishing failed"
  2. "Failed to create the service"
  3. "Failed to extract manifest from uploaded service definition" + "Failed to get basic item metadata for service definition upload"

 

  

1. "Packaging succeeded, but publishing failed"

This blog references this infamous error encountered in ArcMap and presents a comprehensive list of ways to troubleshoot the issue: check the logs, GIS Server connection, Publishing Tools, machine resources, and permissions. Even if you're encountering publishing errors in another client, such as ArcGIS Pro, keep this list in your back pocket because it will still be helpful.  Check out the details of this comprehensive troubleshooting list here.  

 

2. "Failed to create the service"

This technical article on "ERROR 001369: Failed to Create the Service" builds upon the previous blog. Not only does it go into checking the logs, Publishing Tools, machine resources, and permissions - it also covers tuning and configuring services and Opportunistic Locking (OpLocks).  Even if you aren't encountering a publishing error, there are some tips in this technical article that will keep your environment running smoothly.  Check it out for yourself here.

 

3. "Failed to extract manifest from uploaded service definition" + "Failed to get basic item metadata for service definition upload"

This technical article focuses on errors that occur when publishing a hosted feature layer to ArcGIS Enterprise. Both these errors can be caused by one of two things.  One possible cause is that the ArcGIS Enterprise components are not able to communicate through the established SSL protocols.  The second possible cause is that the account running ArcGIS Server's Temp folder is inaccessible.  Look at this article here to read up on how to fix these errors.

 

Hopefully that helps provide some insight into troubleshooting the popular ArcGIS Enterprise publishing errors.  Please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions.  As always, thanks for reading!  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for more This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise.

Happy GIS Day, ArcGIS Enterprise enthusiasts!  For the third round of This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Enterprise, we're going  to be focusing on following buzzwords:

  1. Federation.
  2. Collaboration.
  3. Shared instances.

 

These are buzzwords that we hear all the time in the Enterprise world and, even if you know what these words mean, we're going to take a deeper dive by looking into content that not only explains the jargon but why it is significant to those who work with ArcGIS Enterprise.  With that in mind, let's dive right in!

 

 

1. Federation.

When federation was first introduced as a concept in the days of just ArcGIS Server and Portal for ArcGIS (pre-ArcGIS Enterprise days), I honestly thought it was this intense IT workflow that you may or may not have success with.  Taking the time to learn about it though, I learned that federation isn't scary at all.  Federation just means that Portal for ArcGIS takes over ArcGIS Server's security.  When this takes place, there also can be some gotchas - such as all items will now be owned by the user who set up the federation.  This blog by our friends at Esri Canada goes into more detail, including how to federate, so check it out for yourself here.

 

2. Collaboration.

This is something my colleague, Peter Klingman, covered not too long in the ArcGIS Online space but I want to bring it up again because collaboration is one of those phrases that users may understand at a high level but may not be clear on the details.  Introduced in ArcGIS Enterprise 10.5.1, distributed collaboration allows for you to connect and integrate your GIS across a network of participants by sharing content - either between ArcGIS Enterprise and ArcGIS Online or two different ArcGIS Enterprise instances.  With distributed collaboration comes some even more buzzwords: host, guest, workspace, synchronization - the list goes on!  While it can be daunting, this Esri Canada video breaks it down; check it out here.

 

3. Shared instances.

Introduced in ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7, shared instances often come up as a solution to those experiencing performance-related issues. Shared instances could be a great solution to your performance conundrum but they're of no use to you if you don't know what they are, how, or even if you should implement them in your ArcGIS Enterprise deployment.  The elevator pitch is that shared instances allow for multiple web services to share resources (ArcSOCs) on the ArcGIS Server machine.  But take a look for yourself by reading Scott M. MacDonald's blog here.

 

Hopefully that helped provide some insight into those Enterprise heavy buzzwords.  Please feel free to reach out in the comments below  if there are any outstanding questions  As always, thanks for reading and be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for the next ArcGIS Enterprise installment coming on Wednesday, December 4th.

Welcome back to This Week's Picks – ArcGIS Enterprise!  This week we're going to focus on some content that'll make your life even easier with ArcGIS Enterprise.  Here are the questions we'll be answering:

1. How do I deploy ArcGIS Enterprise in AWS?  It seems rather intimidating.

2. Switching services to use the shared instance pool, simply with Python.

3. I need to make sure all feature classes in my enterprise geodatabase are available as feature layers for my users. Is there an easy way to make sure this happens?

 

October302019

 

1. How do I deploy ArcGIS Enterprise in AWS?  It seems rather intimidating.
Deploying your first ArcGIS Enterprise instance in Amazon Web Services (AWS) may sound intimidating but it doesn't have to be.  Using the ArcGIS Enterprise Cloud Builder for AWS provides an interface for you to deploy ArcGIS Enterprise so you don't need to use Command Prompt or a script (though that's always an option!).  To learn more about this process, take a look at this blog.

2. How do I switch my services to use the shared instance pool without having to go through each individual service?
For those using ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7 and later, shared instances can help alleviate some of the resource pressure in your ArcGIS Server environment.  This is a setting that can be configured for each individual service through ArcGIS Server Manager.  If you only have one compatible service that you want to use the shared instance pool, it isn't too much work to make the switch.  But if you have tens or hundreds of compatible services, this can be potentially tedious.  To avoid such tedium, consider using Python, as explained further here in this blog.

3. I need to make sure all feature classes in my enterprise geodatabase are available as feature layers for my users.  Is there an easy way to make sure this happens?
If you're using ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7.1, you're in luck!  This release introduced bulk publishing (sometimes referred to "batch publishing"), where you register your database as a data store item in the Enterprise portal. Map image layers and feature layers are published from this data store connection.  You'll also find an option to sync the layers, meaning your existing services will be updated and new feature classes will be published as services.  For more details on this new functionality, take a look at this blog.

 

Thanks for reading, fellow ArcGIS Enterprise groupies!  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for the next ArcGIS Enterprise installment coming on Wednesday, November 13th.

As part of the Product Advocacy team here at Esri, I'm excited to introduce this completely unofficial recurring GeoNet post: This Week’s Picks.  As Product Advocacy Leads, we are continuously coming across informative, interesting, and inspiring content.  Through This Week's Picks, we hope to quickly share some of our favorites with you.

 

 

In This Week's Picks – ArcGIS Enterprise, I want to focus on three pieces of content that answer some of the questions I was asked by customers at the UC this past summer.  I know they can't be the only ones wanting to know the answers, so let's share the knowledge by answering these questions!

1. What does it mean to have my data user managed versus ArcGIS managed?

2. Should I move my GIS to the cloud?

3. What type of security should I use when setting up ArcGIS Enterprise?

 

1.  What does it mean to have my data user managed versus ArcGIS managed?

Data can be handled two ways in the ArcGIS platform: it can be either user managed or ArcGIS managed. Oftentimes this concept comes up in passing, whether on a Support call, GeoNet, in training, or in the middle of a Professional Services engagement.  This can leave users stumped.  Not only are they sometimes not sure which type of data management their organization is using, they're not sure if what they're doing is right.  Answer this question for yourself by taking a look at this whitepaper.

 

2. Should I move my GIS to the cloud?
More and more organizations are trying to answer this question as cloud computing has some advantages over on-premise deployments. These advantages include scalability, agility, and cost-efficiency.  This article covers assessing your current infrastructure in order to make sure you make the best choice for your organization; check it out here 

 

3. What type of security should I use when setting up ArcGIS Enterprise?
While anybody can read the documentation to see the security options available with ArcGIS Enterprise, this video takes it a step further by covering configuring SSL, different ArcGIS Enterprise identity stores, and best practices so that ArcGIS Enterprise meets your organization’s security requirements.  See what your security options are by checking out this video.

 

 

Thanks for reading, fellow ArcGIS Enterprise fans!  Be sure to check out This Week's Picks - ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro - and stay tuned for the next ArcGIS Enterprise installment coming on Wednesday, October 30th.

FYI, ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7 was released 2 weeks ago, checkout this great blog for a general overview about its latest enhancements, https://bit.ly/2OvcuOR

 

 

For more detailed blog topics:

 

ArcGIS Enterprise 10.7 Functionality Matrix whitepaper:

https://assets.esri.com/content/dam/esrisites/en-us/media/brochures/arcgis-enterprise-functionality-matrix.pdf 

 

 

Enjoy,

This whitepaper from the ArcGIS Enterprise product management team, discusses considerations when ArcGIS Enterprise is licensed for virtualized infrastructure, both on-premises or in Cloud environments.

 

 

https://assets.esri.com/content/dam/esrisites/media/whitepaper/licensing-arcgis-enterprise-deployments-in-virtualized-an… 

 

Enjoy,

Great blog by Jonathan Quinn and Scott M. MacDonald from the ArcGIS Enterprise Dev team on the Web GIS DR tool and some backup strategies. Worth a read!

 

Design your ArcGIS Enterprise backup strategy

 

 

Enjoy,

This whitepaper from the ArcGIS Enterprise product management team, discusses the two ways data can be handled with the ArcGIS Platform:

 

User Managed: where data owners and admins are responsible for providing and managing the underlying storage infrastructure, e.g., file servers and database servers.

 

ArcGIS Managed: the concept of hosted data because the data is stored within (hosted by) the ArcGIS system and exposed solely through REST based web services that are shown to end users as layer items within their portal. 

 

Also for ArcGIS Enterprise users, the ArcGIS Data Store is not a replacement for existing enterprise geodatabases.
.

 

 

https://assets.esri.com/content/dam/esrisites/media/whitepaper/data-in-arcgis-user-managed-and-arcgis-managed.pdf 

 

Enjoy,

FYI,

 

This is a great blog by Jing Yan, a GIS Consultant from Esri Canada on security certificates and ArcGIS Enterprise.

 

Understand SSL Certificates for ArcGIS Server and Portal for ArcGIS

 

Enjoy,

FYI, ArcGIS Enterprise 10.6 is now available. Learn about its new capabilities in this blog,

 

What’s new in ArcGIS Enterprise 10.6: Overview | ArcGIS Blog 

 

and the ArcGIS Enterprise 10.6 Functionality Matrix whitepaper is also available,

http://www.esri.com/library/brochures/pdfs/arcgis-enterprise-functionality-matrix.pdf 

 

 

Hope this helps,

Great whitepaper by Shannon Kalisky that provides a technical overview of ArcGIS Enterprise, its software components, key concepts such as federation, and outlines 3 options for completing a migration from a standalone ArcGIS Server deployment to the standard configuration of ArcGIS Enterprise called the base ArcGIS Enterprise deployment. It includes an outline of the key benefits, high-level steps, and important considerations for each migration option.

 

http://www.esri.com/library/whitepapers/migrating-arcgis-server-to-arcgis-enterprise.pdf 

 

FYI, several users requested a copy of this Esri UC 2017 technical workshop:

 

ArcGIS Enterprise: Managing ArcGIS Server

ArcGIS Server is the component of ArcGIS Enterprise that enables you to take your GIS resources such as maps and models, and share them as web services. Publishing your GIS resources as web services enables them to be used throughout the ArcGIS platform. This presentation will examine ArcGIS Server at a deeper technical level. Attendees will learn how to administer an ArcGIS Server site more effectively. Topics include: security, defining data stores, log files, and working with the Server Administrator directory.

 

I've attached the presentation in PDF format.

 

EDIT: video recording of this technical session,

ArcGIS Enterprise: Managing ArcGIS Server - YouTube 

 

Enjoy,

FYI: For those of you who will be attending the 2017 Esri International User Conference in San Diego, CA next week and want to learn about ArcGIS Enterprise, the attached flyer might help you find the right session to attend.

 

ArcGIS Enterprise* is composed of 4 components:

 

 

* Since the 10.5 release, ArcGIS Enterprise is the new name for the product formerly called "ArcGIS for Server" in previous releases.

 

If you are starting out and learning about ArcGIS Enterprise, I suggest going to this session first:

- ArcGIS Enterprise: An Introduction

 

Then you can decide which area(s) you would like to focus on and learn more about its components.

Some highlights (not a complete list, see attachment for the complete list):

 

i) Building Your First ArcGIS Enterprise Deployment

ii) ArcGIS Server: ArcGIS Enterprise: Managing ArcGIS Server

ii) Portal for ArcGIS: ArcGIS Enterprise: Introducing Portal for ArcGIS > ArcGIS Enterprise: Administrating Your Portal

iii) ArcGIS Web Adaptor: ArcGIS Web Adaptor Basics

iv) ArcGIS Data Store: Data Store Management Best Practices

v) Security: ArcGIS Enterprise Security: An Introduction > ArcGIS Enterprise Security: Advanced Topics

vi) Deployment: Web GIS: Architectural Patterns and Practices and ArcGIS Enterprise: Architecting Your Deployment

vii) Cloud deployment: ArcGIS Enterprise in the Amazon Cloud and ArcGIS Enterprise in the Microsoft Azure Cloud

viii) High Availability and Disaster Recovery for ArcGIS Enterprise

 

Hope this helps and see you at UC!!

FYI, Sara Sanchez recorded a really nice tutorial video on using the ArcGIS Enterprise Builder to set-up a base deployment of ArcGIS Enterprise on a single machine. Check it out,

 

Get Started with ArcGIS Enterprise Builder - YouTube 

 

 

Enjoy,