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2019

Welcome to round two of “This Week’s Picks” for ArcGIS Pro, Product Advocacy’s unofficial recurring GeoNet blog, and Happy Halloween!

 

To recap, the aim of this series is to highlight noteworthy ArcGIS Pro content, and with the first installment I shared some of my recent favorites in the world of Data Management in ArcGIS Pro with an emphasis on editing.

 

This week’s topics largely fall into imagery capabilities in ArcGIS Pro 2.4.x with an emphasis on multidimensional datasets, deep learning, imagery and Remote Sensing and The ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World.

 

The planet, its systems and how they change over time will always demand attention. With scientific data and imagery support being foundational to a complete GIS, I wanted to showcase resources that tie-in to this theme. As such, the picks show how these capabilities can be used to map or visualize temporal and land cover changes, automate damage assessment after a natural disaster, or analyze and manage raster data (whether multidimensional or representing a singular phenomenon). Some of the tools require certain licensing or Image Analyst so that will be noted. With that, on to the picks!

 

Ever wanted to clip an image service from ArcGIS Living Atlas in ArcGIS Pro? How about taking a custom AOI from an image service or raster and then performing some analysis, such as calculating change over time?

 

This first blog shows just that! It highlights the changing landscape in the Las Vegas area and more importantly, the shrinking Lake Mead to the East that supplies its water. Taking it a step further, and to complete this story of loss, the author uses an artistic approach to symbolize this change. This can be adapted to your own use cases though it may require tweaking to the specifics of your area. Note: The NLCD layer requires an ArcGIS Online subscription.

 

Link: Mapping Loss: The Faces of Landscape Change in Las Vegas

 

Additional resources:

Frequency statistic Tool

Clip Raster Tool

Raster to Polygon

Use Living Atlas content in ArcGIS Pro

 

Have you ever asked: “what are multidimensional data and how can they be used in ArcGIS Pro?” This could go either way, in short you can work with data that has a multidimensional characteristic and 2.4 has some new functionality.

 

Whether you frequently work with scientific data or are simply curious about the multidimensional functionality available in ArcGIS Pro this resource has you covered! Note: Some of the tools require either ArcGIS Pro Standard or Advanced licensing and/or the ArcGIS Image Analyst or Spatial Analyst extension.

 

Link: Let’s do data science! Multidimensional analysis in ArcGIS Pro

 

Additional Resources:

Image Analyst Extension Introduction

An Overview of multidimensional raster data

Raster Functions

Raster functions general tab

 

There has been a lot of buzz around machine learning or “deep learning.” It is no surprise that these methods are seeing their day in the context of natural disasters and disaster response efforts. With ArcGIS Pro, you can use machine learning classification methods to automatically classify remote sensing imagery to identify areas of high risk and then use this data for recovery efforts.

 

This type of automation was shown during this year’s user conference plenary session by USAA in a collaborative effort with Esri. In the aftermath of the devastating Woolsey Fire in California last year, they demonstrated how deep learning could be utilized for disaster response. They were able to train a model to help classify buildings in the fire perimeter and perform automated damage assessment on affected structures. This helped them identify which of their members were impacted. Be sure to watch the video from the plenary below if you missed it. Note: Deep learning is available with an ArcGIS Image Analyst license.

 

Link: Damage assessment using deep learning in ArcGIS

 

Additional Resources:

VIDEO: Remote Sensing for Catastrophe Response

Deep Learning in ArcGIS Pro

 

I hope you enjoyed this week’s picks. Thanks for reading and stay tuned for the next round and if you are interested, you can also check out “This Weeks Picks” for ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Enterprise!

 

-Aaron

The Product Advocacy team at Esri is excited to introduce an unofficial recurring GeoNet series: “This Week’s Picks.” As Product Advocacy Leads, we are always on the lookout for content that is compelling and insightful but also relevant. "This Week's Picks" aims to share some of our favorites with you.

 

For This Week's Picks – ArcGIS Pro, the theme is editing within the broader context of Data Management. We all know that data management is a key aspect of the ArcGIS Platform. Data prep, compilation and management are essential to get to the eventual end goal. That goal may also require creating, modifying, querying or deleting features. As such, I will be highlighting 3 blogs this week that touch on some of these concepts.

 

           1. For users newer to ArcGIS Pro editing, an excellent blog from this summer explaining the editing experience:

            Don't Fret It, Just Edit! (Demystifying how editing works in ArcGIS Pro)

 

            Why I like it: A common ArcGIS Pro editing support topic involves how it is “different” than ArcMap. For users             new to ArcGIS Pro editing, this blog breaks down ArcGIS Pro editing and explains in a clear way how it differs             from ArcMap. It also clarifies some of the misconceptions about editing in Pro.

 

Further readingEditing in ArcGIS Pro

 

2. The next blog is geared toward user’s who have an editing workflow involving ArcGIS Enterprise alongside ArcGIS Pro and want to increase editing and querying performance:

            Performance Enhancements: Using sourceSpatialReference with feature services in ArcGIS Pro

 

Why I like it: This blog discusses how to leverage sourceSpatialReference with feature services in ArcGIS Pro  (new at 2.4) in your editing and querying workflows. This enhancement allows server to do less work on the back end by avoiding projecting the data on the fly. This is particularly good for large datasets and complex  geometries. (NOTE: Requires ArcGIS Server 10.7.1 and later)

 

3. The last blog showcases some of the expanded offline editing capabilities in ArcGIS Pro, specifically with sync and mobile geodatabases:

           Go off the grid with ArcGIS Pro: Offline editing with sync enabled feature services

 

Why I like it: Details a lightweight workflow for extending feature service capabilities to use mobile geodatabases and sync capabilities so that you can bring data offline for editing and other analysis and still sync back with enterprise environments.

 

Supplemental Video: Offline Editing in ArcGIS Pro

 

Stay tuned for more picks on a variety of ArcGIS Pro related topics and if you are interested, you can also check out “This Weeks Picks” for ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Enterprise!