Skip navigation
All Places > GIS > Applications > ArcGIS Pro > Blog > 2018 > June
2018

This blog post shows how to create a Map Tile Package from a Image Service and include it in a Mobile Map Package for offline use.  But what about the Esri World Imagery Basemap?  Well, ArcGIS Pro 2.2 and later provides a convenient way to clip out a portion of the Esri World Imagery basemap for Inclusion in a Mobile map.

 

Start ArcGIS Pro and Open a Project.

On the Insert Tab click the New Map button.

On the Map tab click the Basemap Gallery button and choose the Imagery basemap.

 

Zoom to the extent of the imagery that you want to include in your Mobile Map.

 

On the Map tab click the Download Map button.   Check include basemap & tile layers and click the Download button.

 

The Map Tile Package layer will be added to the map when the export completes. (remove the space in the layer name.. see notes below)

 

A few things of interest:

It is best to set the desired max scale

For the Extent Pictured the default scale was 1:142.  This created a Map Tile Package file (.tpk) that is 845 mb in size.

Choosing a scale of 1:565 creates a .tpk that is 84 mb in size.

 

So, consider the scale that your map users need if file size is a concern.

 

Some extra notes about using Map Tile packages in Mobile Map packages.

Do not use spaces in the name of the Tile Package layer in the Contents pane.  It is OK to rename the layer, but do not use spaces in the name. Tile Package are not written into the package correctly when spaces are used in the name, this issue will be addressed at a future release.

 

Make sure the coordinate system of the Map Tile Package (.tpk) matches the coordinate system of the Map. Custom applications built with the runtime and Esri Apps like Explorer for ArcGIS will not display Tile Package layers if the coordinate system is not the same as the map.

 

ArcGIS Pro allows you to apply symbology to Tile Package layers.  Symbology parameters are not supported by the Esri Runtime. You will just see the TPK as it was originally created in the runtime applications.  You can think of the symbology settings in ArcGIS Pro as over-rides for the symbology defined in the TPK.

 

If you create a Basemap that has a Map Tile Package layer and / or Vector Tile Package layers , do not include a Feature Class (point, poly or line features) in the basemap.  When a feature class layer is present in the basemap with a tile package layer the Mobile Map package is not written correctly, and some of the basemap layers will not display in runtime applications.  This issue will be addressed at a future release.

 

 

I just mentioned Vector Tile Package.  We are often asked how to get Esri Vector Tile Basemaps into a mobile map package, that capability will be possible in ArcGIS Pro 2.3 (it didn't make it in) its in ArcGIS Pro 2.4.  If you have a vector tile package you can add it to the map like any other layer and create a mobile map package. As described in  Use ArcGIS Pro to make an offline map - part 1 

 

Until next time.

Mark

... continued from Using ArcGIS Pro 2.2 Sharing and the Publisher Extension to make a public offline map with hillshading

 

Create a Map Tile Package

Click the burger menu on the Geoprocessing pane and Click Create Map Tile Package.

Fill in the required arguments for the tool.

Select Map for Input Map.

Uncheck the Package for ArcGIS Online | Bing Maps | Google Maps check box.

Enter an Output File name, GTNP_hillshade.tpk, for the Map Tile Package.

Select JPEG for the Tiling Format.

For the hillshade effect, 14 levels of detail will look pretty good, so type in ‘13’ for Level of Detail.

For Service, browse for and select the Tiling Scheme that was created in the previous step. GCS_NAD_1983.xml

On the Extent drop down choose Current Display Extent

 

 

Click Run to create the Map Tile Package.

 

Add the Tile Package to the Current Map. Click the Map tab, press add data button, and add the Map Tile Package (.tpk).

 

On the Catalog Pane – Project – Right click on Map and Convert it to a Basemap.

Remove the Terrain_Layer from the Basemap.

 

 

Copy the GrandTetonBM Basemap layer from the Operational map and Paste it in the Basemap.

Right click Map_BM and Paste the GrandTetonBM layer into the basemap.

 

On the Appearance tab adjust the Transparency for the GrandTetonBM layer to your preferred display.

 

 

Use the Basemap with the Operational map.   Click the Operational map tab to activate it. On the Map tab click the Basemap gallery and click the Map_BM basemap.

 

You have just added Hillshading to the Grand Teton National Park map.

 

Now, Let use ArcGIS Pro 2.2 to and the Publisher Extension to share the map with everyone and make the map useable by anyone who has Explorer for ArcGIS.

 

Check to see if you have the Publisher Extension. Click the Project tab.

 

Check the Licensing Status for the Publisher Extension.

 

If you are licensed for the Publisher Extension you can create maps that can be used by anyone.  If you are not licensed for the Publisher extension, users of the Mobile Map (.mmpk) that you create will need to be signed into ArcGIS Online or Enterprise organization to use it.

 

Share a Mobile Map - On the Share tab click the Mobile Map button to open the Package Mobile Map pane.

 

Fill out the inputs on the Package Mobile Map pane. If you have the Publisher Extension you can Enable the map for anonymous use.

 

Click the Package button to upload the Mobile Map to your Organization and share it with everyone.

Note: You can also use the Create Mobile Map Package geoprocessing tools to create a mobile map and share it.  You can use python to automate the mobile map creation process.

If the map was created for anonymous use any Explorer user can use Explorer without signing in.

And Search For “Grand Teton National Park with Hillshade” to download the map and use it.

 

Woot!  That’s it for now…

Mark

In this post we will continue forward from what was covered in the blog post Use ArcGIS Pro 2.1 to make an offline map.

In this exercise we will modify the package created in that post and re-share it.

 

So, let’s get to it.

 

1. Start ArcGIS Pro 2.2 and open a new blank project

 

In the Contents pane click All Portal and Search for “grand_teton_national_park owner:mark_nitro” and Right click on it to open it.

We will enhance the map by adding a hillshade layer to it. Specifically, we will create a tile package of hillshade imagery to add to our map. The Esri Living Atlas has an Imagery Service that we can use to do this.  ArcGIS Pro makes it easy to use Living Atlas data.  

 

Click the View tab and open the Catalog Pane.

Click Portal, the Living Atlas button, Search for ‘World Hillshade’ and Add ‘Terrain: Hillshade’ to a New Map.

Remove the “World Basemap” layers from the map.

On the View Tab click Link Views Center and Scale.

Click the Operational Map tab to activate the map and zoom to the extent of the basemap.

Click the Map map tab to activate it, and see that it is zoomed to the desired extent.

This is the extent of the data that we want to include in a Map Tile Package.  The tile package needs to be in the same coordinate system as our Operational map, which Is GCS North American 1983. Esri Apps like Explorer for ArcGIS and applications developed with the Esri runtime cannot project Map Tile Packages (.tpk) on the fly. If the tile packages coordinate system is different from the map’s coordinate system, it will not display.  Many of the Living Atlas services are in the WGS 84 Web Mercator Auxillary Sphere coordinate system, so creating a Map Tile Package (.tpk) from the map as it is now, will create a tile package in that Coordinate system .  For image services there is an easy way to get the data into the coordinate system we want, using the Make Image Service Layer geoprocessing tool.

 

Right Click on the Terrain:Hillshade layer in the table of contents and Click Properties. Click Source and copy the Location URL for the Terrain: Hillshade layer. https://elevation.arcgis.com/arcgis/services/WorldElevation/Terrain/ImageServer

 

Click the Analysis tab, click Tools and search for Make Image Server Layer in the Geoprocessing pane.  Click Make Image Server Layer to open the tool.

For Input paste in the ImagerServer URL https://elevation.arcgis.com/arcgis/services/WorldElevation/Terrain/ImageServer

For Processing Template choose Grayscale_Hillshade

 

On the Environments tab set the Output Coordinate system to GCS_North_America_1983

Click Run

The layer will be added to the map.

Remove the Terrain: Hillshade layer from the map.

Right Click the map in the Contents Pane, click Properties and Set the Coordinate System of the map to GCS North American 1983.

Since we have the Map Properties window open, click Metadata and enter a Description for the map. A map description is required when creating a Map Tile Package

We are going to use this layer to provide shading for the Grand Teton National Park map.  Let’s lighten up the shading a little bit.

 

Right Click on the Terrain_Layer and click Symbology to open the Symbology Pane.  On the Symbology Pane click the Color Scheme and Click ‘Format color scheme…’

Lighten up the color scheme by adjusting the color of the first stop.  Click the first stop and change its color to a lighter shade of gray and click OK

In the Geoprocessing Pane Search for Create Map Tile Package and Open the tool.

The Create Map Tile Package tool is set up to create content in WGS 1984 Web Mercator Auxillary Sphere coordinate system, this won’t work for our example map, so un-check the box.

Notice that the Create Map Tile Package tool requires an existing service or .xml tiling scheme file to create the tile package in a coordinate system that is not WGS84 Web Mercator Auxillary Sphere.

We will use the Generate Tile Cache Tiling Scheme geoprocessing tool to create a tiling scheme.

 

Click the burger menu on the geoprocessing pane and click Open Another Tool.

 

Search for Generate Tile Cache Tiling Scheme and open the tool.

 

Generate Tile Cache Tiling Scheme requires and input data source. Ideally, we could use the Terrain_Layer we created with the Create Image Server Layer tool, but this won’t work, if you use it, a tile scheme for WGS84 Web Mercator Auxillary Sphere will be created.  To create an input data layer that we can use, do the following:

 

Click the Terrain_Layer in the content pane, Click the Imagery tab and click the Process Button to Create a temporary raster clipped to the current display extent.

This will add a new layer, Clip_Terrain_layer, to the Content Pane.  We will use this layer as Input to the Generate Tile Cache Tiling Scheme tool.

 

Fill out the input for the Generate Tile Cache Tiling Scheme tool.

For input data source choose the “Clip_Terrain_Layer”

Enter a name “GCS_NAD_1983” and location for the output tiling scheme XML file.

Set number of Scales to 20, the scales will fill in automatically.

In Advanced Options, set the Tile Format to JPEG.

 

Click Run to create the Tiling Scheme. You can open the XML file in a webbrowser or text editor to confirm that the coordinate system is correct.

 

 

On the Content pane Right Click “Clip_Terrain_Layer” and remove it from the map.

 

Now we will create a Map tile package, the tile package will be created based on the current display of the map, that is why we adjusted the cartography to our liking, before creating the tile package.  

 

Continued - Using ArcGIS Pro 2.2 Sharing and the Publisher Extension to make a public offline map with hillshading - Part 2

ArcGIS Pro 2.2, Esri’s flagship 64-bit desktop GIS, has been released and is available. Now is the perfect time to migrate to ArcGIS Pro

 

ArcGIS Pro 2.2 is the largest update to ArcGIS Pro yet and brings a slew of new features and functionality. It adds and improves your highly requested workflows, features new innovations that take advantage of ArcGIS Pro’s unique 3D and 64-bit environment, and connects your desktop more tightly with the rest of the ArcGIS platform.

 

Slice Tool

Explore content hidden behind or within other content with the new interactive 3D exploration tool, Slice. You can slice through content in your scenes using planes or volumetric shapes. Slice is included among the other Interactive Analysis tools in the 3D Exploratory Analysis tools introduced in ArcGIS Pro 2.1.

 

Full Motion Video (FMV)

 

Play and analyze full-motion video (FMV) data that is geospatially enabled with the ArcGIS Image Analyst extension. Enable the projection and display of the video frame footprint and sensor position on the map while the video plays. You can also collect features in the video player and visualize them on the map, or collect features in the map and see them displayed in the video player.

 

New Styles

Inferno, Magma, Plasma, and Viridis scientific color schemes are now included in the ArcGIS Colors system style. These color schemes are particularly useful with imagery, LAS symbology, unclassed, and graduated colors symbology. They are also effective for grey scale environments and color-blind users.

 

Additional Innovations and Updates

ArcGIS Pro 2.2 is a big release. Here are some more new features:

  • Support for reading Autodesk® Revit™ files enabling access to architectural model data inside ArcGIS.
  • Stream layers: a new layer type that displays real-time streaming data.
  • Apply photographic textures when interactively editing 3D objects.
  • Pause drawing of a map or scene and still interact with it. While paused, you can navigate, add layers, or change the symbology; the state of the map will not refresh until paused drawing is turned off.
  • Clip a measured grid to only show coordinates within its UTM zone boundary. This is especially useful when mapping areas that cross UTM boundaries.
  • 50 new geoprocessing tools and batch geoprocessing to automate the running of a tool multiple times using many input datasets or different parameter settings.

 

Get the full details and watch video from the ArcGIS Pro developers on what’s new in ArcGIS Pro 2.2.