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2015


The Road to UC.

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Karlee and Taylor are Esri events marketing coordinators who handle the housing needs for the Esri UC. As you can imagine, it’s a big job that requires two people – although some days it probably feels like an army couldn’t get it all done!

 

It’s helpful that they knew each other before working so closely together here in Redlands - both ladies worked at the same retailer previously, one as a scheduler and another in accounting. They also attended the same University - California State University San Bernardino.

 

Karlee has a GIS certificate, as well as her bachelor in Geography with a minor in Environmental Studies. Taylor is a Sports and Entertainment Marketing major. Together, they make sure there are places to stay in San Diego so you can get a good night’s sleep and get the most you can out of the conference.

 

While neither one would share any funny stories they had about the UC (what happens in San Diego, stays in San Diego? At any rate – your secrets are safe with these two!) They did tell us a little bit about themselves and what goes into their preparations for the UC.

 

How did you discover Esri?

 

Karlee: I discovered Esri the moment I started the GIS program in college. Esri was the place to work if you wanted anything to do with GIS. I found that Esri was hiring through a career fair at Cal State – San Bernardino. Esri had a booth there and someone from the human resources department did an interview on the spot and told me to apply online.

 

When do you start preparing for the UC?

 

Taylor: The minute it’s over! I begin setting timelines and organizing information for the next year in August.

 

What are some fun facts about housing at the UC you can share?

  K

K          Karlee: We block around 30,000 room nights for attendees to book at a discounted rate throughout the conference dates.

 

What do you like most about the UC?

    

     Karlee:I love seeing and meeting so many different people from all walks of life. I am always amazed to see people from almost      every country one place, with one common interest.

 

     Taylor: There are a lot of late nights and stressful days leading up to UC, so I love getting on-site and seeing all of our hard work come to life. I      also love interacting with users on-site. They are all so excited to be there and are so passionate about what they do.

 

Why do you like maps?

Karlee: There are so many things that can be mapped. Trends, patterns, phenomena, all sorts of things! It’s also fascinating to me that we can map the same thing in multiple ways, giving us a different perspective each time we look at it again.

Taylor: I like maps because they each tell their own story.

 

What is your insider tip for the UC?

               Karlee: Make your hotel reservations as early as possible to get rooms at the closest hotels! Rooms sell out fast!!

               Taylor: Wear comfortable shoes!

 

Have you registered yet? That is your first step to securing a great hotel room at a super price. Register now!

Learning about ArcGIS for Collector at last year’s User Conference led Arizona State Lands to implement a major program. Find out more about the value of the Esri UC to this senior executive who he doesn’t even log on to ArcGIS every day.

 

Meet Evan Brom, the first person to register for the Esri UC 2015. Mr. Brom is the Chief Information Officer for the Arizona State Land Department.  Brom directs the GIS and IT departments and oversees the State Cartographer’s office.

 

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Originally from Tempe, Arizona, he has both a B.S. in the technology industry and a Masters in Business Administration (MBA) from Arizona State University. He is also a Project Management Professional (PMP). 

 

Do you want to know a secret? Brom doesn’t use Esri software himself that often, but he finds the UC so valuable, that not only was he first in line when registration opened, this will be his fourth conference.

 

I sat down with Brom to talk a little bit about his experiences at the conference and learn what he finds valuable about this event.

 

So you confessed that you are not a regular user of GIS, but you work with those that do?

 

To be honest, I personally do not frequently touch ESRI’s products, but with my direction, my talented GIS team uses Esri software to accomplish great things including: tracking of land ownership and rights of ways and leases; performing complex analysis of the impacts of proposed actions; and - with Collector for ArcGIS - my users are now able to take Esri on the road with them to collect data at its source.

 

How long have you been involved with GIS?

 

Personally I have been involved with GIS related projects in some capacity for the past eight years. The Arizona State Land Department has a single digit user number and has made use of Esri since the early days.  Some employees attend the UC as far back as 1982.

 

How many UCs have you been to?

 

This will be my fourth UC.

 

What is the most rewarding part of the UC?

 

Seeing the different ways people can and are using the vast suite of products.  Also networking with other senior executives is another great benefit of the conference.

 

Do you have a big take away from the conference that you can share with me?

Last year learning about Collector for ArcGIS and its offline capability led to a major deployment for our people that work in the field.

 

What do you look forward to the most from the UC?

Learning about the new products, services and techniques that will help me bring better, faster more cost-effective solutions to the business.

 

Have you always liked maps?

From when I was a small child I liked globes, maps and any visual representation of data.

 

Why is location important to what you do?

Not that this needs much explanation, but land is not a commodity. Each square foot we manage has its own unique features such as waterways, minerals, slope, habitat and more. Location is the only true way to organize this data.

 

How will you use what you learn from this year’s conference?

That is hard to say as I do not know specifically what I will learn, however I think learning about the roadmaps for ArcGIS Pro and ArcGIS for Desktop will help with some of our future plans.