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Several anniversaries were acknowledged during the week of the UC. There were subtle nods in the event design and not-so-subtle swag giveaways for Esri’s 50th anniversary during the Thursday night celebration. In the Plenary, Jack acknowledged the City of San Diego’s 250th anniversary when they accepted the President’s Award. Jack and Laura also happened to be celebrating their anniversary as well during the week of the UC.

 

Along with record-breaking UC stats, 2019 was a momentous year for Esri and a particularly special landmark for one of its networks. 

 

The Esri Young Professionals Network (YPN) celebrated their own milestone of 5 years as a collaborative network bringing young professionals in the geospatial industry together to push the boundaries of technology and bridge connections to GIS with the broader world.

 

Overview of YPN Social at UC 2019Above: Attendees at the YPN Social on Wednesday Evening at UC 2019

 

In 2014, YPN started as an Esri employee network in the Washington D.C. office. Jeff Peters, who is now Esri’s Global Business Director, led the network in the beginning to bring employees together as they started their careers in geospatial technology and set the foundation for their career pathways. Participation from a diverse group of employees in all career stages helped foster a community of professionals that helped newcomers to GIS with mentorship and creative thinking. YPN quickly had to move its roots to the Esri headquarters in Redlands due to the overwhelming growth. The network broadened with user participation as well.

 

YPN Fireside Chat at UC 2019At the UC, YPN hosted sessions and events including a Welcome Social & Fireside Chat on Sunday and their popular YPN Social on Wednesday evening. Attendees have come to expect huge turnouts and great networking, but Wilson Parnell, an Advisory Board Member of YPN, said that wasn’t always the case for YPN’s events in the beginning.

“When YPN hosted sessions before, there would typically be anywhere from five to six in attendance, and now we’re experiencing standing room only in some sessions,” said Parnell. “Our growth in numbers speaks to one of our accomplishments in the past five years.”

 

Left: GeoNet at the YPN Welcome Social & Fireside Chat

 

YPNx5 Presentation at UC 2019

Above: Mark Jensen presents the Illinois County Tour Map at the YPNx5: Beyond the Horizon Session at UC 2019

 

YPNx5: Beyond the Horizon was a session that highlighted the anniversary of YPN at the UC. Instead of touting the accomplishments of the network, however, they turned the focus to their mission to “Connect, Learn, and Lead” by presenting speakers who were seeing beyond current advancements in technology like aerial imagery and artificial intelligence and presented topics that were speaking to their future perspectives as up-and-coming geospatial technology leaders. Their leadership stories all held a theme of service to a bigger picture, from saving penguins and sharks, making decisions around climate change and military strategy, demonstrating fun ways to bring new people into mapping, and using GIS as a catalyst to change the possibilities for African American women and Latino communities.

 

 “The whole theme of the UC is about service. GIS allows you to make better decisions whether you’re in business, non-profit, social advocacy, or local government. It allows you to chart and map important areas to conserve. GIS is about being in service to someone or something else and I’m glad we captured that feeling in our YPNx5 session.,” said Parnell.

 

YPN Advisory Board Member, Caroline Garris sees the collaborative nature of YPN as one of its greatest assets and accomplishments. “Not only did we see growth in our sessions, but so many other special interest groups (SIGS) were able to host their own sessions for the first time at the UC,” said Garris. The UC hosted several SIGS around diversity and inclusion that YPN supported with promotion and development efforts to get them launched. They look forward to seeing more SIG sessions being offered in the future.

 

As far as future growth and goals for YPN, Garris sees YPN reaching beyond the 20,000 attendees at the UC. They’re reaching for the world.

 

“GIS is a powerful technology,” said Garris. “Using GIS makes us powerful as professionals. So now the question we pose within our network is: How do we share GIS with the broader world so that they can be empowered too? We challenge young professionals to think beyond mapping to explain the power of GIS and how it applies in so many areas. We want to share the power of the 20,000 people at UC with everyone around the world.”

 

It’s safe to say, we can expect young professionals of all ages will continuously be born in the future with more anniversaries to come under the helm of YPN’s mission and dedicated members. Cheers to your first five years Esri Young Professionals Network and to rising GIS professionals everywhere!

 

Want to help them reach their goal of reaching out to the world? YPN announced a challenge to GIS professionals at the UC that will soon be shared with the GeoNet Community. Learn more about how you can help spread the knowledge and power of GIS with YPN. Follow their space for announcements! 

 

If you’re a YPN member, go down memory lane with YPN in this post and share a YPN story that impacted you.

Attendees at Balboa Park

A week of geospatial inspiration and networking with a global community had to be celebrated and the Thursday Night Party in Balboa Park was just the place to do it. The UC 2019 Thursday Night Party had an added celebratory factor of recognizing Esri’s 50th Anniversary with special swag while attendees danced, dined, and discovered Balboa Park’s many attractions including natural history and art museums. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special Anniversary Swag

I beelined through the crowd for the back of Balboa Park to find the pop-up Esri store before it was too late to get some special swag for the anniversary. The pop-up store had anniversary t-shirts, hats, flashlights, and coasters for sale.

 

And of course, there were free buttons. 

 

T-Shirts at the Esri Pop-Up StoreAttendee reaches for an anniversary button


Not only were buttons part of the free swag, attendees received blue bandanas with a “Celebrate Esri’s 50th Anniversary” message on them. 

 

Stack of Anniversary BandanasBandana Close Up

Best fashion use of the bandana goes to this fellow from Texas:

 

Man Wearing Anniversary Bandana

 

 

Sights & Entertainment


For the most part, dinosaurs, sharks, and people like Rosie the Riveter were just hanging out…

 

Natural History Museum DinosaurNatural History Museum SharkRosie The Riveter Hanging from Anchor

 

 

Some people danced.

 

Sailor and Woman Dancing

 

This attendee was inspired to draw.

 

User Inspired to Draw at Thursday Night Party

 

Some people played drums.

 

Woman drums with Thursday Night Party performers.

 

Others played games...

 

Group Plays on Foosball Game Table

 

Lots of games.

 

Young children playing Jenga

Man and Woman Play Up 4 It Game

There was plenty of entertainment. At any corner of the park, you could find your rhythm.

 

Mariachi Band Performing

Mexican Folk Dancers

 

Mexican Folk Dancers Performing

 

Mariachi bands and Mexican folk dance performances were at one end of the park...

 

Band Performing on Stage

Women Singing in Military Costume

...with bands of various music styles on stages in other areas of the park.

 

Men Walking through PartyMan Gives Woman High Five While Riding A Bike

Performers paraded through the crowd and DJs kept the energy alive. 

 

Drummer Smiling in Camera

DJs at Thursday Night Party

 

 

Good times were had by all, including GeoNet MVP Andres Castillo and family!

 

Family enjoying Thursday Night PartyFamily enjoying Thursday Night Party

 

Moments & Milestones Timeline

 

Back at the San Diego Convention Center, Esri installed a timeline wall and asked attendees to share their moments along with Esri's key moments over the past 50 years.

 

Timeline Panel at Esri UCTimeline Panel at Esri UC

 

If you were there, did you spot which year GeoNet formed?

 

 

Some memories on the wall from the past five years….

2018

“Philly Women in GIS Branch Started!” -Anonymous

“Started as GIS intern at Environmental Field Services” – Tatiana H.

 

2017

 “First Time I tried to use a geoinquiry lesson in my middle school (LAUSD) classroom. I wish I had done maps more over the last 10 years but I lacked ability. My students displayed maps at L.A. GIS Day 2017” -Anonymous

“Livingston County, Michigan – First Public Parcel Viewer. Folks Love It!” - Anonymous

 

2016

“I was introduced to GIS and my life changed forever!” – Sarah Grimsley

 

 

“Saw Dawn Wright at CVCSB and declared a geography major after“ - Anonymous

 

2015

“Federally recognized native entities of Alaska most conclusive map released” - Anonymous

“First conference attended in 2015 – came back every year since…” - Anonymous

 

2014

“First map-a-thon at The George Washington University” - Anonymous

 “Thanya takes Do Kim’s infamous Advanced GIS Studio and passes with an A! Love of GIS is born.” -Anonymous

 

Here's a personal favorite moment from the wall in 2014:

 

“GeoNet community forms.” – Esri

 2014 GeoNet Community Forms on the Timeline

 

Do you have any fond GIS moments from the past? Share yours in the comments. Check out GeoNet member Adrian Welsh's blog on the UC experience and see more highlights in the User Conference Space.

Unfortunately, UC 2019 had to come to an end. Good thing we have next year’s dates already set for July 13-17, 2020. Let the countdown begin!  

 

New and returning UC attendees certainly made their mark this year in San Diego. Here are a few UC 2019 stats from the Closing Session: 

 

Plenary 

If you watched the Plenary Livestream, you were one of 26,652 total unique viewers who joined us around the world to watch 43 speakers inspire us with how they are applying The Science of Where.  

 

Jack highlighted a tweet from a dedicated livestream watcher: “What happens when you can’t make the #EsriUC because you just had a baby? You stream the plenary session from the hospital room!”   

 

Check out our review of the Plenary with links to the YouTube playlist.  

 

People

  • 17,086 Attendees
  • 133 Countries Represented
  • 115 Interest Groups
  • 2,300+ Esri Staff
  • 59 Student Assistants

 

Learning & Resources 

  • 220 Paper Sessions
  • 342 Technical Workshops
  • 223 Demo Theaters
  • 137 EXPO Spotlight Talks
  • 226 Exhibitors

 

Logistics & Fun Stuff

  • 3,367 Airport Check-ins
  • 2,500 Gallons of Coffee
  • 44,000+ Plastic Bottles Saved
  • 1,180 Maps
  • 498 Runners in the 5K Fun Run/Walk
  • 109,500 Buttons

 

Dave displays his bundles of buttons and badges.

 

 

 

 

Speaking of buttons, GeoNet Member Dave Watson had attendees in awe of his collection of buttons and badges.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GeoNet button

 

 

How many of you were lucky enough to get your hands on a GeoNet button? We’ve given away about 500 of these at Esri events this year.  Be sure to look out for our button at the next event!  

 

 

 

 

 

Map Gallery Awards  

 

Out of the 1,180 maps submitted to the Map Gallery, award winners were announced during the Closing Session for the following 16 categories: 

 

  • ArcGIS Analytics and Results 
  • Reference Maps 
  • Thematic Maps 
  • Map Series or Atlas 
  • Educational Map 
  • Student Map up to age 12 
  • Student Map Ages 13-18 
  • Student Map - Post Secondary 
  • Communicating Science Spatially 
  • Spatial Analysis Story Map 
  • 3D Map 
  • Most Innovative 
  • People’s Choice 
  • Best Cartography  
  • ICA and IMIA Recognition of Excellence in Cartography 
  • Cartography Special Interest Group Excellence 

See the 2019 Map Gallery Award winners. Congratulations to the winners!   

GeoNet 2019 Contest Winners 

 

 

GeoNet members Robert Scheitlin, GISP (1st Place), Dan Patterson (2nd Place), and Joshua Bixby (3rd Place) were recognized for their outstanding participation and winning the GeoNet Contest as part of Esri’s Award announcements.

 

Congratulations and thank you for your incredible contributions!  

 

Start your journey to becoming a most valuable participant in GeoNet:  Help out a fellow Esri user and learn how to find and reply to unanswered questions or share your Esri platform knowledge and experience.   

 

For more tips on how to get started, visit the GeoNet Resource Hub.   

 

See our other UC 2019 highlights: 

Highlight #1: The Expo Experience at Esri UC 2019 

Highlight #2: Maps and Their Makers at UC 2019 

Highlight #3: Plenary Focuses on Our Community, Our World 

Highlight #4: GeoNet Community Unites, Shares Stories 

Highlight #5: Stats from UC 2019, Map Gallery and GeoNet Award Winners

Being a part of an online community allows you to reach out to people when you need them the most.  When you run into a problem right in the middle of a project, someone in the community knows how to help.  If you need to think out loud and share your thoughts for feedback, someone in the community responds and creates an enriching conversation. People share ideas. People share solutions. People in the GeoNet Community make connections. 

 

We had the pleasure of meeting GeoNet members in person at UC 2019 and hearing some of the great stories and experiences they've had in the community. One of these stories, I featured in an earlier UC 2019 Highlight with GeoNet member Kevin Chrichlow. Chrichlow started using GeoNet as a college student while working with ArcGIS extensions. Now, as a college professor, he's looking to encourage his students to use GeoNet for proactive problem-solving and skill development. See his story in Highlight #1: The Expo Experience of Esri UC 2019 

 

Also, check out additional Highlights from UC 2019: Maps and Their Makers and Plenary Focuses on Our Community, Our World 

 

The GeoNet team hosted a few sessions for current and new community members at UC 2019 and talked with attendees to introduce them to GeoNet. Here's where we went, who we met, and the stories we heard: 

 

Building Community GeoNet banner at YPN Fireside ChatGeoNet team talks with YPN Social attendees

 

GeoNet at YPN Fireside Chat 

 

Our UC week started at the Esri Young Professionals Network Welcome Social and Fireside Chat on Sunday, July 10th.  YPN's Fireside Chat places hosts with expertise in an array of GIS intersections at different roundtables to have a conversation about their featured topic. GeoNet hosted a table along with Education, Esri Startup Program, Sustainable Development Goals, Equity & Social Justice, Women in GIS, Women in Tech, and a featured speaker for a discussion on Instagram. We met with Esri users and student assistants about joining the online community and shared how GeoNet can be a resource for career development.  

 

Chris Catania shares a member story at a GeoNet 101 Session

 

Welcoming New Members

 

Users at the conference came to GeoNet 101 sessions to learn more about the Esri Community and to get started with creating their profile.  It was exciting to connect with new GeoNet members and help them navigate through the platform by way of the GeoNet New Member Scavenger Hunt.   

 

New member Michelle Derry successfully logged in and celebrated by sharing joyful high-fives with the GeoNet team. Michelle is looking forward to being an active GeoNet member to connect and learn from other users who are transitioning from ArcMap to ArcGIS Pro. If you're looking for the same place, see Implementing ArcGIS. 

 

Michael Thibodaux was urged to attend the session from a colleague at his company. He saw GeoNet come up several times while seeking answers to questions but never elected to join the community. After learning more about the GeoNet’s capabilities and broad range content, he left with pride and satisfaction that he became a member of a thriving community of more than 15,000 monthly active users. 

 

A popular topic we discussed with users centered on creating spaces and groups in the community. If you're interested as well, visit New Place Request Hub to learn how to place your request.  

 

GeoNet MVPs, GeoNet Team, and Esri Staff at the MVP Community Meet-Up

 

MVPs Share Memorable Moments 

 

This community has a long history of being a resource for developers and users of all types. Our Most Valuable Participants (MVPs) have been a significant reason why most members turn to GeoNet for guidance.  You might be familiar with names like Robert Scheitlin, GISP, Dan Patterson and Joshua Bixby. They have won the GeoNet Contest multiple years and their engagement in the community represents a core value of what GeoNet is all about: Being Helpful, Being Human and Being Smart.”  

 

Ken Buja, Andres Castillo, William Craft, Adrian Welsh, Chelsea Rozek, Ted Cronin, and Curtis Price along with Esri staff Amy Niessen, Kirsten Pinkston and John Foster attended our invitation-only GeoNet MVP Meet-Up on Wednesday. After hearing from the GeoNet team and our plans for the future of GeoNet, we talked with the MVPs and asked them to tell us about their most memorable moment in the GeoNet Community. 

 

"When the e-mail invitation to become an MVP arrived, I realized I had bragging rights," said Andres Castillo. A close runner-up to the most memorable moment for Castillo was getting @ mentioned from a member, affirming him as a knowledgeable and trusted resource in the community. 

 

Ted Cronin's memorable moment was being asked to do early testing for the user experience on GeoNet back in 2014. He appreciated the special invitation and interest in his feedback to improve how users connect, communicate, and find the information they need. 

 

Ken Buja's memorable moments in GeoNet is reading anything from fellow MVP contributor Robert Scheitlin, GISP. As a result of how generous and knowledgeable he is, Robert’s name comes up a lot in GeoNet success stories. And it was surprising that it took more than 25 minutes into the meeting before his name was mentioned.  

What's your memorable moment on GeoNet? How have the GeoNet MVPs helped you? Share it with us in the comments below.  

 

GeoNet Community Meet-Up at UC 2019

 

GeoNet Community Meet-up 

 

Our last meet-up at the UC was open to all GeoNet Community members. Users met each other and shared more stories about their experiences on GeoNet. A memorable moment for the GeoNet team was hearing about how the community has supported members through critical challenges at work. It truly captured the impact of a user community with a wide range of accessible knowledge and helpful active members. It also reinforced the fact that GeoNet is a safe and trusted place, and a valuable tool to advance and navigate your career as a GIS and geospatial professional. 

 

Chelsea Rozek and Andres Castillo talk to GeoNet Community members. 
Above: MVPs Chelsea Rozek and Andres Castillo introduced themselves and told their stories about using GeoNet. 

 

Peggy Deaton of Bureau of Land Management shared how having a private group on the GeoNet platform helps her large organization communicate with employees around the country. Having ArcGIS Enterprise and GeoNet connected simplified adoption of the platform as a solution for their employees to post questions and receive announcements.  

  

Jeff Davis uses GeoNet frequently and has relied on contributions to help him get through problems. As the only GIS professional in his organization, GeoNet is the authoritative place he trusts for problem-solving with fellow ArcGIS users. "I don't know how many times it has saved me from problems down the road and problems that I'm going through. It has been awesome. It really has," said Davis.  

 

MVPs Chelsea Rozek and Andres Castillo added that the exchange between Esri staff and users in the GeoNet platform helps members communicate with their broader organization and clients about current limitations in the products and future updates in the software. "It's nice that Esri staff comment a lot and chime in about functionalities they're considering," said Rozek 

 

See our ArcGIS Ideas page to see ideas that GeoNet members are submitting for future product development.  

 

GeoNet will continue to host in-person opportunities at Esri events for members to meet each other in person and to meet the GeoNet team. Be sure to add it to your plans if you're attending an event in the future! We're always happy to hear about your stories and experiences in the community. Thank you to all the GeoNet members that spent some time with us at UC 2019!

 

More highlights:

Highlight #1: The Expo Experience at Esri UC 2019 

Highlight #2: Maps and Their Makers at UC 2019 

Highlight #3: Plenary Focuses on Our Community, Our World 

Highlight #4: GeoNet Community Unites, Shares Stories 

Highlight #5: Stats from UC 2019, Map Gallery and GeoNet Award Winners

The Plenary opened with a moving collection of storytelling about the important work Esri users are doing and concluded with Jack Dangermond, Jane Goodall, and E.O. Wilson dialoguing about the future of our world. If you missed the livestream with more than 20,000 viewers worldwide (wow!), you’re in luck: Videos from the plenary are now available on Esri’s YouTube channel. 

 

In this post, we’ll describe the in-person experience and link to the videos so you can see all of the action for yourself. 

 

The opening video makes a compelling statement about how attendees are making a difference using GIS to See What Others Can’t. On Twitter, we shared a video of Jack talking about his “aha” moment with GIS while working as a landscape architect in Boston. We encourage you to watch the video and document your own “aha!”  moment with us here in GeoNet. Join the discussion.

 

Also: Hear from Esri staff and users from the conference about their moments on Twitter.  

 

The Plenary Meet and Greet 

 

Before diving into the world of GIS, Jack pauses to encourage everyone to turn and meet someone new.  

 

Thousands of Plenary attendees from all over the world introduce themselves to each other.

Thousands of plenary attendees from all over the world introduce themselves to each other.

 

Your Work 

 

Jack moves on to highlight a few maps from users all over the worldHe shows a map from the Bay Area of California that demonstrates how engineering and public works staff are using artificial intelligence to predict water main breaks and highlights how public safety professionals in Sri Lanka use spatiotemporal maps to visualize and analyze crime data. 

 

The domestic, international, and Young Scholar Special Achievement in GIS (SAG) awardees were displayed on the screen, followed by Jack presenting the Enterprise GIS Award to the District of Columbia (DC GIS) and his President’s Award to The City of San Diego. The City of San Diego is celebrating their 250th anniversary this year. 

 

Curious about how it feels to be an Esri Award winner? I talked to two winners from the SAG awards in this post.

 

GIS: The Intelligent Nervous System 

 

Jack shares his vision of GIS: The Intelligent Nervous System

 

This year's theme, GIS: The Intelligent Nervous System, is a way of understanding how all of our separate efforts to capture, visualize, and analyze data are creating a global nervous system. As users, we form an intelligent network that’s addressing worldwide challenges. GIS helps us see the complexity, relationship, and patterns of those challenges.  

 

How do we continue to build this global nervous system with GIS? Jack shares his vision: 

 How your work as a GIS professional is essential

 

Your Work Is Essential

 

It Will Take Leadership: 

  • Envisioning What’s Possible 
  • Learning, Sharing & Collaborating 
  • Strategic Thinking 
  • Engaging Communities 
  • A Passion to Create Understanding and a Better World 
  • Leveraging The Science of Where to See What Others Can’t 

 

ArcGIS: Creating a Common Language 

 

The Esri geospatial cloud is one of the ways that our global nervous system communicates. Jack reviewed updates to ArcGIS products and solutions, including ArcGIS Notebook Server and introduced Mission, a product planned to release this winter, that supports real-time peer-to-peer communication and situational awareness in the fieldTake a look at this clip and see the product roadmap for ArcGIS.  

 

Here are a few notes that stood out about some of the products: 

 

Following the ArcGIS product review, Jack explained why serving our users is so important and how we’re focused on advancing The Science of Where. 

 

Featured Stories & Guests 

 

Jennifer Bell demonstrated the new experience of ArcGIS StoryMaps using the expedition story of Alex Tait, a digital explorer from National Geographic Society. Tait went to Mount Everest to take high-resolution photogrammetry of the Khumbu glacier and documented his story with a series of images and maps. StoryMaps is available in 37 languages and is also mobile-friendly. See Alex Tait's StoryMap to experience the new modern, professional, and streamlined way to tell your story 

 

NatureServe took the stage to share how they used biodiversity data and ArcGIS Pro to map the location of 2,000 endangered species in the United States. Their map is accessible to engineers and planners so that they can be mindful of endangered species in their plans for construction, development, and land management 

 

In the second session, City of Pasadena firefighter Oscar A. Sepulveda III introduces himself to an audience of GIS professionals by saying, “I’m a firefighter. I’m not a GIS analyst. I can’t write code.” He jokingly underscores his non-technical service to the public by saying, “I put the wet stuff on the red stuff.” Sepulveda demonstrated how the City of Pasadena uses ArcGIS to monitor response locations and times as well as see a history of incident reports as a part of being an intelligent city. 

 

More amazing stories and product demonstrations from United Services Automobile Association (USAA), New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (NY MTA), ExxonMobil, U.S. Census Bureau, Ambassador Stefano Toscano of Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining (GICHD), students from Lurgan Schools in Northern Ireland, African Parks, and National Geographic concluded Act II of the Plenary. View now on Esri's YouTube channel.

 

2019 Esri UC’s Big Ideas 

 

Get a visual recap of the Plenary’s big ideas, Jack's vision for the GIS community, and all of the incredible presentations that inspired hope and collaboration. Download the poster. 

 

Related from Esri Blog: See How Maps Help the Media See What Others Can’t  

 

If you’re curious, this is what it looks like when UC attendees take on Downtown San Diego for lunch: 

 

UC attendees take a lunch break in Downtown San Diego

 

Kevin Eubanks Shares “The Gift” 

 

Kevin Eubanks talks with Jack Dangermond on the Plenary stage

 

We had a special guest at the Plenary. Kevin Eubanks, musician and former bandleader for The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, performed an inspired song for attendees. Eubanks is a seasoned UC attendee who finds himself inspired by the work of GIS professionals and the natural geography of our world. See the performance. 

 

Eubanks’s performance was a touching reminder of our natural world's beauty. It created a mindset for the conversation and call to action that came from Jane Goodall and E.O. Wilson, two impactful leaders in conservation and environmental advocacy. Goodall and Wilson received what sounded like a waterfall of applause in the convention center when they came to the stage.  

 

Jack Dangermond, Jane Goodall, and E.O. Wilson have a conversation on the Plenary stage

 

The Future of Our World 

 

E.O. Wilson stated there are three crises we are currently charged to manage: climate change, shortage of freshwater, and a collapse of our ecosystems with a particular concern for species. In response to Jack’s question about the roadmap to address these issues, Wilson responded that more research is needed to understand biodiversity. It’s estimated that 10 million species exist in the world, and we only have identities and characteristics of 20% of those species. Wilson encourages young professionals to close the gap by choosing careers to increase knowledge in biodiversity. 

 

Jane Goodall echoes the call for youth to take action and encourages us to face up to the challenges of our planet. She frames an approach for creating global change by saying the phrase think globally, act locally” is the worded in the wrong order. By making thoughtful decisions about our actions locally first, we will collectively make an impact on the world every day. As the 39th Plenary came to a close, she led the audience in a chant recited by the youth at the end of their Roots & Toot's meetings in Tanzania: “Together we can! Together we will!”  Watch the full conversation.

 

More highlights:

Highlight #1: The Expo Experience at Esri UC 2019 

Highlight #2: Maps and Their Makers at UC 2019 

Highlight #3: Plenary Focuses on Our Community, Our World 

Highlight #4: GeoNet Community Unites, Shares Stories 

Highlight #5: Stats from UC 2019, Map Gallery and GeoNet Award Winners

Before you start here, check out our first highlight from the UC 2019 Expo

 

The UC is known for gathering thousands of geographers, cartographers, students, IT professionals, and other non-technical professionals together for inspiration and innovation. What do these professionals all have in common, especially during this conference?

 

The love of maps.

 

Maps are at the center of all the action at the UC. In the Reception Gallery on Monday, mapmakers and map-admirers made their way under the greenhouse-styled area of the San Diego Convention Center.

 

A view of the Map Gallery Reception at UC 2019.

 

The opening reception hosted special guests that signed books and posters and took photos with attendees:

 

Tracy R. Wolstencraft of the National Geographic Society was at the National Geographic booth signing posters. By the way, have you used their latest basemap in your in any of your projects?

 

Tracy R. Wolstencraft of the National Geographic Society was at the National Geographic booth signing posters.

 

Jack Dangermond stopped and took selfies with UC attendees.

Jack Dangermond takes selfie

 

A few of the featured storytellers of the Women In GIS book were signing copies and meeting readers. 

 

 

A Few Maps from the Gallery

 

Among the maps that uncover some of the world's hidden challenges in print, 3D, and digital interactive media, there were a few maps that I thought were interesting:

 

Europa Tech encouraged overwhelmed UC attendees to take a mindful minute and color their stress away on this Ordnance Survey MasterMap Topography Layer of central London, UK.

 

A UC attendee takes on the mindful mapping challenge.

Learn more about this map.

 

Houseal Lavigne Associates brought their collection of game maps to the gallery. This submission is based on The Settlers of Catan, a German board game that originally came out in 1995. They used hexagonal tiles to reimagine the gameboard with the United States as the playing field.

 

The Settlers of Catan board game re-imagined for the United States.

Learn more about this map.

 

This map brings historic transportation data from Japan to life with modern technology. Tokyo Metropolitan University used ArcGIS Desktop 10.5.1 to create this spatial-temporal map of daily streetcar passengers in the 1930s that were counted by observation.

 

Tokyo Metropolitan University's Streetcar Map with data from the 1930s.

 

Learn more about this map.

 

Walk through the gallery like a UC attendee by visiting the online map gallery.

 

Recognition for A Map Well Done

 

One thing I always wondered about going to the UC is: How does it feel to attend the conference as a nominee and leave as an Esri award winner?  I asked some winners from the Special Achievement in GIS Award ceremony on Wednesday about their experience and their work. Here's what they shared:

 

I talked with David Sutton, Director of GIS for Savills in New York. Savills won an award for the Knowledge Cubed platform, that hosts one single point of entry to interactive maps and data sources for real estate. He describes one of the feature maps in the platform is a 3D interactive map that allows you to set your search criteria to reveal only a selection of a 3D environment based on your inquiry. From there, you can explore the real estate's analytics that incorporates Esri's Business Analyst data and collection of other sources created with the Viewshed feature in ArcGIS Pro.

 

You can learn how to Perform Viewshed Analysis in ArcGIS Pro in this Esri Academy Web Course.

 

The industry of real estate is a competitive market, and Sutton was proud to be recognized and "crush the competition" when it comes to creating dynamic experiences for their clients that can stand out from the rest.

 

"It feels good to get recognition. We worked hard on something and people noticed," said Sutton.

 

A similar concept of an immersive 3D experience got Young Scholar winners Daniel Laumer and Hasret Gümgümcü of ETH Zurich, Switzerland recognized for their project Urban X. Urban X used Esri's City Engine to create an urban planning app for Microsoft HoloLens, a mixed reality headset that displays interactive virtual holograms. With their application, you can interact with 3D rendered real estate to get data on the buildings and color code units based on their attributes.

Daniel Laumer and Hasret Gümgümcü pose with their Young Scholar Award

Esri's Research & Development worked with ETH Zurich's lab to provide the opportunity for Daniel and Hasret to push the boundaries of augmented reality.

 

I asked Daniel about what they learned so far at the UC. Daniel said, "We learned a lot more about ArcGIS Pro, and we thought we knew a lot about ESRI, but there's so much more than we already knew." He describes being there for the first time has been an amazing experience.

 

When I asked about how it feels to be a winner, all while taking in his first time at the UC, Hasret said with a smile, "It feels pretty nice."

 

Daniel describes his interest in GIS started with the love of maps. "I've always loved maps, which is what got me interested in the field, but I'm also interested in technology and coding. GIS is the perfect combination." Hasret feels the same. He always loved maps as a child and combining the ability of software engineering with something he already has an interest in makes GIS such an inspiring industry with great opportunity for innovation.

 

If you would like to know who else went home feeling like a winner, see the Special Achievement in GIS Award webpage.

 

Being recognized for hard work and dedication doing something you love is always a great feeling. The walls of the User Conference capture this inner passion and drive the best. I bet they've all felt this at some point…

 

I'd rather be mapping

 

More highlights:

Highlight #1: The Expo Experience at Esri UC 2019 
Highlight #2: Maps and Their Makers at UC 2019

Highlight #3: Plenary Focuses on Our Community, Our World 

Highlight #4: GeoNet Community Unites, Shares Stories 

Highlight #5: Stats from UC 2019, Map Gallery and GeoNet Award Winners

Happy UC 2019 GeoNet!

Before I hop into our highlights of the Esri UC, I’d like to introduce myself to you:

I’m Leslie Fountain, a new member of Esri's GeoNet team. I’ll be serving as the Community Content Manager for GeoNet, capturing and sharing the stories and information that this community is generating every day.  Nice to e-meet you! (Or should I say Geo-meet you?)

If you’re at the UC come by our booth in the Lifelong Learning Expo or at our Community Meet-up. I’d love to say hello in person.

Now that we’ve got introductions out of the way, let’s get to the good stuff:

2019 Esri UC's Big Ideas 

The User Conference Plenary on Day 1 was full of moving stories and big ideas. Take a glance at what was captured from the plenary in the 2019 Esri UC's Big Ideas Infographic. Esri captured the topics and products used in the featured stories from the plenary presentations. Nothing like having digital swag for our digital audience! Download the poster.

See What Others Can't

You can join the conversation going on at the UC by sharing your "aha!" moment with GIS. Post your moment when you realized you could #SeeWhatOthersCant in our GeoNet discussion

Videos

Clips from the plenary are now available on Esri's YouTube channel. We'll have an overview of the experience as a part of our highlights posted soon. 

 

UC 2019 Expo

 

The GeoNet team was present in the Expo answering questions and meeting users from all over the world in the Lifelong Learning area. 

 

At the booth, we walked a few new and current users through some ways to use GeoNet and listened to feedback about their experience in the community.

 

We walked GeoNet Member "Skip" through finding the GeoNet Place for ArcGIS API for JavaScript.

 Skip talks with the GeoNet team about finding places of interest in the community.

 

Around the expo, we caught a few cool experiences and attractions:

 

Have you ever had a dream you were flying? If you want to relive your dreams, check out this booth from PLW Modelworks that’s using an immersive VR experience. Brave VR fans can simulate flying over the New York City skyline and are encouraged to crash into a few buildings for surprise virtual worlds.

 

A UC attendee immerses himself in a VR experience above New York City's skyline.

 

If you’re not willing to fly, you can head over to the sustainable world area to check out Home After War, an award-winning virtual reality experience where you can see the perspective of an Iraqi father returning to Fallujah, Iraq to his home that’s facing the imminent threat of war.

 

UC Attendee experiences a virtual reality story of a father in Fallujah, Iraq

 

Port of Rotterdam brought a 42' shipping container to the Expo floor. This smart shipping container has been traveling the world, equipped with sensors that monitor temperature and other metrics of its environment as it moves from location to location. 

 

 

Port of Rotterdam showcases a smart shipping container, equipped with solar panels, sensors, and more.UC attendees meet and walk through the shipping container.
Port of Rotterdam showcases a smart shipping container, equipped with solar panels, sensors, and more.UC attendees meet and walk through the shipping container.

 

 

GeoNet Member Highlight

Kevin sees the possibilities of the GeoNet platform.

 

Back at the GeoNet booth, we had the pleasure of meeting long-time GeoNet member Kevin Chrichlow of Algonquin College in Ontario, Canada. He asked some great questions about how to leverage the GeoNet Community with his students, and we asked him a few questions about his experience with GeoNet. Here’s what he shared:

 

Kevin poses with the GeoNet logo.Early in Kevin's GIS career, he started using GeoNet as a college student seeking answers to questions about ArcGIS extensions.  Once he dove into the community where dialogue and conversations were happening around products and their new releases, he found GeoNet as a valuable resource for getting answers to common questions when using ArcGIS products.  The impression of the community as a key resource for problem-solving stayed with him as he progressed in his career. Now, as a Professor, he's looking for ways to give that same discovery and access to his college students as a part of his educational curriculum.  We shared with him about the capabilities of the GeoNet's groups and places to meet his needs.

 

As a first time UC attendee, Kevin described his experience at the conference as "mind-blowing." He mentioned this idea about bridging the experience of GeoNet with his students had been on his mind for at least the past two years. The potential for students to use the database of problem-solving built within the community over time not only can increase his students capacity for using the products but can increase their self-sufficiency for independent learning.

 

Kevin, we appreciate you taking the time to talk with us and sharing your story!

 

Summits, Sessions, & Symposiums

 

Mark Davis presents to the GIS Managers Summit at Esri UC 2019

At the GIS Managers Summit, we learned how GeoNet member Tyler Bragg, a GIS team of one in the City of Oak Hill, West Virginia used ArcGIS Pro to propose a new walking trail at Needleseye Park. It's one of the many features coming to the park, that will serve as an attraction for hiking and rock climbing enthusiasts in his region.

 

  • A 3D Master Plan of the park built with ArcGIS Pro and City Engine can be viewed here.

 

 

 

Kory Kramer, Susan Tran and Jill Scholz guide users through ArcGIS Pro

CX team member Kory Kramer gave us a Pirates of the Caribbean experience in his UC session with Jill Scholz and Susan Tran to show an audience how to use new features in the latest release with a few tips and tricks to get things done effectively and efficiently.

 

Dawn Wright opens the Science Symposium at Esri UC.NCAR presents their ArcGIS Pro map to the Science Symposium

 

Dawn Wright opened the Science Symposium to a large group of scientists at the UC. For one of the presentations, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) focused on the prevalence of heatwaves in the United States and its potential impact on vulnerable populations. In ArcGIS Pro, they created a map showing areas with high temperatures that raise concerns for public health.

 

We wrapped up the evening at the Developer Social, where we chatted with developers of the ArcGIS StoryMaps and caught some special guests walking through the event. GeoNet MVP member Andres Castillo and the GeoNet team got a chance to meet in person for the first time and have a great conversation.

A view of the Developer Social at Esri UC 2019A family of ducks walk through the Developer Social

 

For Day 3, we're looking forward to hosting our first GeoNet 101 Session at User Conference 2019 to help attendees join the community.  Stay tuned! I'll be back to share more of the 39th Esri User Conference Here's a little something from the walls of the UC to remember...

 

 Work Hard. Stay Humble. Make Maps!

 

More highlights:

Highlight #1: The Expo Experience at Esri UC 2019 

Highlight #2: Maps and Their Makers at UC 2019 

Highlight #3: Plenary Focuses on Our Community, Our World 

Highlight #4: GeoNet Community Unites, Shares Stories 

Highlight #5: Stats from UC 2019, Map Gallery and GeoNet Award Winners

MMathias-esristaff

2019 UC Q&A

Posted by MMathias-esristaff Employee Jun 26, 2019

Esri has compiled a list of commonly asked questions for those attending User Conference 2019. Questions about logistics, the meaning of this year's theme, plenary topics, and much more can be found in the 2019 UC Q&A. If you have additional questions not answered in the Q&A, you can post them here in the UC space on GeoNet.

We're getting ready for UC 2019 and this year we will be hosting three GeoNet specific sessions as well as being in the Conference Expo all week.  

 

For new members or those wanting to learn more there is a GeoNet 101 session where you can get hands-on instruction. If you are looking to connect with other members and hear more from our team on upcoming plans, then come along to the GeoNet Community Meet-up. For everyone, whether a member or not, we would love to meet you in the Expo in Lifelong Learning areas, so stop by pick up some GeoNet swag, share a story and chat with us and your fellow GeoNet members

 

Check out the details and schedule links below and let us know what you're looking forward to this year! You can follow along during the week, share your experiences and ask questions in the User Conference space.  If you're new to UC or have tips to share for UC newbies, be sure to check out and contribute to this conversation

 

We had a great time connecting with you last year and we're looking forward to seeing you again at UC!  

 

GeoNet 101 

New to GeoNet? Want to learn great tips and tricks to get more out of your GeoNet experience? We're hosting two opportunities to come along to a GeoNet 101 hands-on session to welcome and support new members and those thinking about joining.  

 

Know a fellow Esri user who is coming to UC 2019 and is interested in learning how to get started on GeoNet? Recommend this session to them.  

  

When:  

Wednesday July 10, 9.30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. PST 

Thursday July 11, 9.30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. PST 

 

Where: Marriott – Pacific Ballroom 24 

  

Who are these 101 sessions for? 

This hands-on and instructional session is for those who are interested in learning more about the benefits of joining GeoNet or members who have just begun their journey and want to learn more about how to collaborate and share with the Esri Community. 

  

Add it to your schedule >> 

  

What to expect? 

  • Learn the basics of how to get started on GeoNet so you can join and learn from this growing community of more than 200,000 Esri users and GIS professionals. 
  • We'll also share success stories about how GeoNet is helping users to share ideas, ask questions, collaborate better and get help on their GIS projects. 
  • This session is a hands-on interactive session, so you’ll get plenty of practice along with tips and tricks to help you be successful in your GeoNet journey. 

GeoNet Community Meet-up 

What: Connect with other members and hear how and why more than 200,000 community members, like you, are working better, sharing ideas and finding valuable solutions on GeoNet. We'll also share more about upcoming developments planned for the Community and inspirational user success stories.  

  

Add it to your schedule >>  

  

When:  

Thursday, July 11, 11:30 am – 12:30 p.m. 

 

Where:  SDCC - Room 15 B 

GeoNet @ UC Expo 

What: Meet the GeoNet Community Team in the UC Expo. Share your stories, ask questions, see what is new and upcoming, and let us help you be successful.  

  

When: 

Tuesday, July 9, 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

Wednesday, July 10, 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

Thursday, July 11, 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. 

 

Where: SDCC - Expo Halls A, B, C - Lifelong Learning Booth 

MMathias-esristaff

UC 2019 Agenda

Posted by MMathias-esristaff Employee Apr 10, 2019

Getting excited about User Conference 2019? The high level and detail agendas are both now available on the Esri User Conference Events page.

As we wrap up the week with the closing session we say farewell, adios, até logo, adieu, arrivederci, la revedere, auf wiedersehen, dag, vi ses, farvel, tot wederdom, do svidaniya, do zobaczenia, doviđenja, ahoj, adijo, sayōnara, zài jiàn, joigin, annyeong, namaste...

 

Closing Session

Welcome to the final day of UC coverage on GeoNet! It's been an exciting week of connecting and collaborating with you during UC. The last day wrapped with the closing session featuring ... GeoNet awards, Jack's closing remarks, and the Open Q&A session. Here are some of the highlights and links to all the UC GeoNet coverage. Enjoy! 

 

Live from the 2018 User Conference Plenary: Morning Session

Live from the 2018 User Conference Plenary: Morning Session Part 2

Live from the 2018 User Conference Plenary: Afternoon Session

Esri UC 2018 Day 2 Updates

Esri UC 2018 Day 3 Daily Updates

Esri UC 2018 Day 4 Updates: Meet-Ups, Final Expo Minutes, and the Thursday Night Party

@EsriGeoNet

 

Closing Session Segments

Table of contents

Opening and Introduction of Esri Directors

Jack welcomes and thanks to the audience for being here and reminds them to start planning to be here for next year. He gives an introduction to the directors of Esri.

 

UC 2018 Map Award Winners

The following is a list of the winners for this year's Map Awards presented by Riley Peake. Congrats to the winners and thanks to all who submitted your work this year! 

 

You can see all the Map Gallery Winners for this year at Esri Storytelling with Maps Contest. And if you didn't get your Map Gallery book, you can still check it out .

  • Analytics Methods & Results
    • 1st place: A Geospatial Coastal Resiliency Assessment for the United States 
      Ian Johnson, Kim Rhodes, and Greg Dobson
  • Reference Map
    • 1st place: Juneau Area Trails Guide
      USDA Forest Service Alaska Region and Pacific Northwest Region Cartography Unit
  • Thematics Map
    • 1st place: New Daily Light Integral Maps for the United States
      Joanne Logan and James Faust, University of Tennessee
  • Map Series or Atlas
    • 1st place: Ecological Atlas of the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas
      Melanie Smith, Max Goldman, Erika Knight, and Jon Warrenchuk (editors), Audubon Alaska
  • Educational Map
    • 1st place: Building the Foundation for a Regional 3D Basemap
      Pat Landrum and Andy Gordon, San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG)
  • Student Map 1 - up to age 12
    • 1st place: Junior Ranger Programs in California
      Mihir Konkapaka, Morning Creek Elementary School
  • Student Map 2 - Ages 13 - 18
    • 1st place: Mapping the 150th Anniversary of a Rural Pennsylvania Camp meeting
      Sandro Ansari and Stephen Ansari
  • Student Map 3 - Post-Secondary
    • Derailing Conservation: Identifying Suitable Wildlife Crossings across Kenya's Trans-National Railway
      Gaia Bonini, Tufts University
  • Story Map
    • Explore North East Link
      North East Link Authority & GHD (Evan Quick, Coraline Jauniau, Tim Righetti and Molly Campbell), GHD
  • 3D Map
    • An Economic "Win" for Geodesign 
      Devin Lavigne, Houseal Lavigne Associates
  • Most Unique
    • What is within a 30-minute walk in London
      Nicholas Duggan, Garsdale Design Ltd
  • People's Choice
    • Emergency Spatial Support Center - How Indonesia is Responding to Disaster using Spatial Technology
      Ahmad Muttaqin Alim
      Muhammadiyah Disaster Management Center
  • ICA and IMIA Recognition of Excellence in cartography
    • Swiss Hiking Maps - swisstopo
    • Ecological Atlas of the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas - Melanie A. Smith, Max S. Goldman, Erika J. Knight, and Jon J. Warrenchuk (editors), Audubon Alaska
  • Cartography Special Interest Group Excellence
    • GIS in Newport Harbor - Jordan Baltierra, City of Newport Beach
    • English Midlands by Canal - Doug Cain, City of Fort Collins
    • Swiss Hiking Maps - swisstopo
  • Best Cartography
    • Ecological Atlas of the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas - Melanie Smith, Max Goldman, Erika Knight,
      and Jon Warrenchuk (editors), Audubon Alaska

GeoNet Awards: 2017 Top Contributors 

Earlier this year we recognized the top GeoNet contributors Jayanta Poddar, Dan Patterson, and Robert Scheitlin, GISP, and it was exciting to give them a well-earned shout out at UC, too. 

 

The Road Ahead

Jack talks a little more about the Framework of The Science of Where and how Web GIS is driving digital transformation. 

 

Conference Observations

  • Real Experiences
  • Community GIS (New and Unexpected Connections)
  • Inspirational Maps
  • Analysis Workflows and Tradecraft
  • Energetic Interactions
  • Users teaching users

 

UC Facts & Stats

  • 17,901 attendees 
  • 2,200+ Esri Staff
  • 142 countries 
  • 307 Exhibitors 
  • 600+ students 
    • A special shout-out to the Student Assistant program. This program plays a crucial role throughout UC and in starting and further GIS careers after the event. You can get involved and learn more about it here 
  • 1,100+ Young Professionals
  • 108 Expo Spotlight Talks
  • 34 Plenary speakers
  • 480 Technical workshops
  • 124 Special Interest Groups
  • 237 Demo Theaters
  • 198 Paper Sessions
  • 1,700+ Maps (Map Gallery)
  • 580 runners (Esri 5K)
  • 105,600 buttons (Did you get your GeoNet button?)
  • 5,500+ Gallons of Water 
  • 4,000+ Boxes of Water
  • 2,400+ Gallons of coffee
  • Total Live Hours Viewed 4,800 hours
  • Lots of Inspiration and Enthusiasm
  • Many success cases
  • Many lifelong connections
  • Future GIS-ers
  • Many Lifelong learners!

 

What we can do better

  • Inclusive Policies for families
  • More childcare
  • Growing conference
    • Crowded map gallery
    • More food trucks
    • Better audio quality in demo theatres
    • More charging stations
  • Want Additional Expo Hours
  • An earlier release of agenda
  • Better navigation of the conference
  • Dynamic room changes
  • Wifi performance
  • Better communication around submitted papers
  • Need more Ad Hoc meeting spaces

 

Special Announcement

While we were at UC, Thailand made their amazing rescue of the students trapped in the cave.

Thailand Rescue

Open DiscussionQ&A - Open Discussion

There was a lot of applause and many great questions and suggestions that came from the audience members. The best question was from an audience member that asked if Jack would wear a MapMan costume for the 50th Anniversary at UC next year. Jack responded by saying that his team should also wear one.

 

Jack's Closing Remarks

Jack praised his team, the organization, and the people that make Esri happen and make the difference for the customers, users and the community. Jack thanks everyone once more. Next year will be 50 years for Esri. Be sure to attend the User Conference. It will be a big one.

 


 

Thanks so much for following along! And a big thanks to all the guest contributors (Amy Niessen, Adena Schutzberg, Joseph Kerski, Kirsten Pinkston, Kory Kramer, Katie Cullen, Scott Prindle, Thomas Edghill, and many others)  who shared their experiences with us throughout the week. It was great to partner with you this year and expand the coverage and perspective of UC 2018.  

 

We hope you enjoyed UC 2018! We look forward to hearing what you've learned and what your biggest takeaways were from this year's event. Let's continue the conversation in the User Conference space and in the comments below!

We wrapped up Day 3 with a few evening activities. Check out the Esri UC 2018 Day 3 Daily Updates.

And in case you missed any of our other updates, enjoy.

Live from the 2018 User Conference Plenary: Morning Session 

Live from the 2018 User Conference Plenary: Morning Session Part 2

Live from the 2018 User Conference Plenary: Afternoon Session

Esri UC 2018 Day 2 Updates 

Esri UC 2018: The Final Act

@EsriGeoNet

 

As we quickly approach the final few activities of the User Conference, we spent a few hours at the GeoNet Expo booth meeting with so many attendees and GeoNet members.

 

Michelle and Chris helping Chris DiDio

Michelle and Chris are helping Chris Di Dio.

Candace answering questions

Candace Loya answering questions about GeoNet.

 

Final GeoNet Meet-Up for UC 2018 

We said farewell to our GeoNet members and non-members at the last GeoNet Meet-Up of the week.

GeoNet Meet-up 071222018

Chris Catania is leading a chat with GeoNet members at the Thursday GeoNet meet-up.

GeoNet Meet-Up Photo with member at UC 2018

GeoNet members are finally putting a face to the names they see in the Community.

GeoNet Meet-Up Photo at UC 2018

Chatting with GeoNet Champion Adrian Welsh

GeoNet meet-up with members

Chris Catania talks GeoNet with Andrew

 

MOOC Meet-Up

Written by Adena Schutzberg, MOOC Program Manager

 

The MOOC team hosted its first MOOC Meet-Up at the Esri User Conference. We so enjoyed meeting our online students face to face!

 

In our MOOCs, we encourage students to help one another out and to learn together. We brought that spirit to the MeetUp and urged attendees to team up to build structures with our multicolored MOOC business cards. Among the entrees were a replica of Padres Stadium, a model of the recent Hawaii earthquakes, a woven tapestry and a campground. We awarded each member of the team behind our favorite creation, which used the cards in multiple ways, a copy of Ken Field’s new Cartography. Book.

 

Build something winners

The winning team rolled, bent and flexed MOOC business cards into this 3D structure.

I shared a few facts and figures about our MOOC students in the past four years:

 

  • Our instructor taught 133, 000 students
  • Students earned 27,000 Certificates of Completion
  • We’ve offered 22 MOOCs

 

The highlight for attendees, I think, was meeting their instructors, and some of the “behind the scenes” MOOC team members. The five Cartography. Instructors, decked out in their “wizard” T-shirts said hello, as did Brendan O’Neill, instructor of Do-it-Yourself Geo Apps and Kevin Butler, instructor of Earth Imagery at Work. Linda Beale, who set the bar high with the Esri’s first MOOC, Going Places with Spatial Analysis, literally ran in from another meeting to greet students, and confirm her commitment to developing “season two” of that course. Every instructor gave the nod to longtime MOOC instructional designer Nancy Matheny, who shared that her favorite part of the role was interacting with the very motivated MOOC students in the course forums.

 

Carto Wizards - MOOC

The five instructors of Cartography. came dressed in their cartography wizards T-shirts. Wesley Jones, far right, drew the cartoons which now grace buttons and stickers.

Our attendees provided some great ideas for future MOOCs that we’ll take into consideration. The MOOC team appreciates students coming out to spend time with us and their passion for learning and helping one another learn. With that good energy, we are ready to get back to work and update existing  MOOCs and make new ones!

 

Esri MOOCs are free multi-week courses open to anyone. Esri provides all the needed software and licenses, and students can work at their own pace whenever they choose to complete the course content.

 

Register today to join us for one of our upcoming MOOCs!

 

Starting September 5 (registration ends September 20)

    

Starting October 31 (registration ends November 15)

  

Thursday Night Party

Attendees and Esri staff had some well-earned fun at the Thursday Night party. Many attendees, many families, cute ducklings, so much food, music, museums, and fun.

 

In line for the party bus.

Hundreds of attendees were waiting in line for the party bus outside the convention center. The excitement was in the air.

Romeo

O' Romeo, Romeo. Wherefore art' thou Romeo?

Ducklings at the Esri UC Party

Ducklings at the Esri UC Party

 

Dragon Dancers

Dragon Dancers in the China Town area

Where is Lara Croft?

Where is Lara Croft?

Beautiful architecture

The beautiful architecture was everywhere to behold.

So many attendees

So many attendees. Recognize anyone?

Live music

Live music and beach balls.

Children dancing

Even the kids were dancing.

Shark pool

Did you find Waldo at the Train Museum? We know where the Shark was hiding.

 

And tomorrow we will have the closing session - Esri UC 2018: The Final Act. Stay tuned for the final day. 

Day-3 and we have walked many steps over the last few days. How many of you are reaching more than 15,000 steps before 5 p.m.? Think of all the calories you are burning this week.

 

We wrapped day 2 with great conversations at the GeoDev Meetup last night. Thank you for the engaging discussion, John Hickok. Be sure to tell your students and co-workers about GeoNet. 

 

Today we bring you so much more as it is our busiest day at the User Conference. The GeoNet team is on the move at our GeoNet Expo booth, at sessions, and at the events.

 

Esri 5K Run

With the rise of the sun, Esri UC Attendees put on their running shoes and took a crisp run at the Esri UC 5k. You can watch the footage of the 5k Run on Instagram.

Esri 5k Runners

Congratulations to the runners and the winners!  Pictures courtesy of the @EsriUC on Twitter.

Winner of Esri 5k UC Run

 

WeCan and Women in GIS Activities

We kicked off the morning at the "WeCan Empower Your Voice" workshop where we met with many amazing women in tech and heard from Ali Rose, Karen Kemp, Lilian Coral, and Paulette Brown-Hinds discuss empowerment, having to speak up and how having a voice has impacted their careers in the positive and negative.

WeCan Empower Your Voice Panel

Left to right: Karen Kemp, Ph.D., Paulette Brown-HInds, Ph.D., Lilian Coral, and Ali Rose

 

  • Ali Rose, GLobal National Government Marketing Director - Esri shares moment a defense meeting when she had to speak up at committee meetings to come up with a solution for a defense concern, "It was hard to speak up, but I did."
  • Lilian Coral, Director of National Strategy - John S. James L. Knight Foundation tells about the beginning of her career and her mission to improve public safety while she worked for a politician after grad school. Her defining moment was during this first role when she had to negotiate for pay increases for a unit that of poorly paid medical employees and she had to hold out for a satisfying pay for this unit.
  • Paulette Brown-HInds, Ph.D., Founder - Voice Media Ventures shares when she started writing editorials that were impactful, had the power to make changes and drew the attention of politicians and city officials. She realized then that her voice had a chance to make an impact. She became more of a civic leader as a result of using her voice in her editorials.
  • Karen Kemp, Ph.D., Professor - University of Southern California leads off with taking the opportunities and not knowing where it will take you. She says, "Follow your gut and follow your heart." She says she didn't realize that she was experiencing a life-changing event until later. She took a career on a GIS project that would evolve into the leading GIS curriculum for the next 20 years. 

Their advice for success: mentorship, clarity about what you want to do for your life, be mission-oriented, know what is important to you when it comes to your life and career, listen and be respectful, and don't fear change.

 

Women In GIS LuncheonIt was a full house at the Women in GIS Luncheon where Dawn Wright and others shared inspirational words with the women in the room. They gave a brief overview of WiGIS and a call to action for mentors, volunteers, and sponsorship opportunities.

 

If you want to know more about WeCAN (Esri’s own “Women’s Empowerment & Career Advancement Network”) please reach out to Margot Manasevit at MManasevit@esri.com. For information about WiGIS, you can send an email to admin@womeningis.org.

 

 

At the Expo

Throughout the day we had many visitors stop by the GeoNet Espo booth in the Lifelong Learning. 

Joseph Kerski and Michelle Mathias photo bomb the GeoNet booth.

Joseph Kerski and Michelle Mathias photobomb the GeoNet booth.

Ashley Snyder and Chris Catania

Ashley Snyder and Chris Catania

GeoNet demonstration by Chris Catania

Chris Catania gives a quick demonstration of GeoNet to Natalie Stork and Andy Renshaw.

 

Buttons

If you didn't get a new GeoNet button, be sure to stop by tomorrow before the Expo closes.

 

Family Night

Michelle Mathias and many UC attendees brought their families to the Family Night where they enjoyed activities, conversation and had a chance to see what makes their parents job so cool. It's not just about maps; there are pirates, Cityworks Sam, yo-yos, VR video games, and giant bouncing globes.

Conterra had Pirates at Family NIght

Conterra had Pirates at Family NIght

Cityworks Sam

Cityworks Sam danced with everyone.

Family Night VR Games

Pam brought her children to Family NIght for VR fun in the HP Expo Area. 

Schneider Electric globe

Schneider Electric had a giant globe. Imagine volleyball with that.

Grape photo booth

Grape photo displays at the Leica Expo area.

Yo-Yos at Digital Globe

Light-up yo-yos at the Digital Globe Expo area for the kids.

 

GeoNet Meet-Up

We were excited to meet our GeoNet members and learn more about why they visit GeoNet and hear their feedback about their GeoNet Community experience. Chris tells the attendees about GeoNet's recent accomplishments and statistics as well as what is to come. Thank you for coming and sharing. It is great to put faces to our members.Left-right: ChrisCatania, Chris Donohue, GISP, Lili Tran, Maneet Goyal, Michelle Mathias, Seth Lewis, and the Lithium Technologies Team -Brian, Jayme, Becky, and Ross.

GeoNet Meet-Up Group Photo at UC 2018

 

Esri Young Professionals Network (YPN) Evening Social

It was shoulder-to-shoulder at the Esri YPN Evening Social on the breezy Hilton Pool Terrace. Shared great conversations with new connections.

YPN Social

 

If you missed the action yesterday, you can go back and read all about it at Esri UC 2018 Day 2 Updates. We will have more to come in a Day-4 update tomorrow including the Thursday night party. Will this one be more exciting than DevSummit 2018 Day Three? How much fun have you had this week?

Yesterday we brought the Plenary to you through a three-part live blog. Today we added the videos from the plenary for your enjoyment. Check them out for the highlights and recap.

Live from the 2018 User Conference Plenary: Morning Session

Live from the 2018 User Conference Plenary: Morning Session Part 2

Live from the 2018 User Conference Plenary: Afternoon Session

 

Day One Post-Plenary

We also shared a lot on Twitter throughout the day. Including a video glance at the Map Gallery and Evening Reception. Check it out >>

 

While at the Map Gallery we caught up with some of our GeoNet members who had map submissions displaying at the Map Gallery.

 

GeoNet Member

Tonya Kauhi - Celebrate Women in STEM

Dan Cameron's map at Map Gallery

Dan Cameron - Distillery Tours of Kentucky

 

Cassidy Bishop enjoyed displaying the work that his team built in the Interactive Map Gallery.

Digital Map Gallery 

 

At The Expo

That was just day one. Day two is buzzing with attendee enthusiasm now that the Plenary has inspired everyone. The GeoNet Team was up early and collaborating at the GeoNet booth in the Lifelong Learning area at the Expo. Many guests stopped by during the morning hours.

 

Tuba Gok & Serap Naciye - Esri Turkey

Tuba Gok & Serap Naciye of Esri Turkey visited to say "Hi" and ask questions about GeoNet.

Sophia Frye and Chris Catania

Sophia Frye stopped by and got a quick shot with Chris Catania.

Greg Jameson - RDG Planning & Design

Greg Jameson stopped by. He is looking for the person who took his picture before us so he can get a copy. 

GeoNet Member - Darren Moser of IEHP

Darren Moser and Candace Loya catch up on old times and GIS activities in the world of health care. The GIS team at IEHP is receiving a SAG Award on Wednesday and is also featured int he Map Book this year for their work on Mapping in Health Care. 

Adrian Welsh-GeoNet Champion

Adrian Welsh, GeoNet MVP, dropped in for a morning chat with Chris Catania before scurrying away for conference activities.

The GeoNet Team: Left to Right - Candace, Michelle, Chris, and Shelby

The GeoNet Team: Left to Right - 

Candace Loya, Michelle MathiasChris Catania, and Shelby Connors

 

Lightning Talks

Amy Niessen shares a little about who presented at the Lightning Talks for this year's UC in her blog A Smashing Good Time - Lightning Talks at Esri UC. Twenty presenters covered various topics of what they have accomplished in GIS using Esri tools. 

 

GIS in Education

Joseph Kerski shares his blog about the Emerging Educational Themes from the Esri User Conference 2018 as he meets with many educators visiting the conference, all with enthusiasm to learn more, share what they learn and teach our younger generations how GIS is used in our digitally transforming global society. If you have not had a chance to meet Joseph, stop by the Education area at the Expo for a quick chat. 

GIS Managers' Open Summit

This morning we had a chance to visit the GIS Managers' Open Summit and listen to Elected Officials/Executive Panel Discussions on the value of GIS from their perspective with Adam Carnow.

 

GIS Managers' Open Summit, Elected Officials PanelLeft to Right: Adam Carnow, Esri Staff and GIS Managers' Summit Host; Florida Property Appraiser, Katrina Scarborough shares that she has a mapping background which helps her to use GIS as an elected official; Tyson Fettes of the Wisconsin Register of Deeds shares his interest in GIS stems from the need to use it in his office and never heard of GIS until his county needed to update their workflows; And Eddie Canon, Cobb County, GA Support Services Agency Director shares his interest in GIS stems from their need to improve workflows and services. Cobb County also developed the Cobb Commute app for traffic.

 

And later in the afternoon, we spent some time visiting the afternoon session at the GIS Managers' Open Summit with Nick O'Day discussing maximizing your GIS innovation solutions to staff and the public while keeping up with requests. Nick even gave a "shout-out" to GeoNet as a resource for support. He talked about tools for using tools such as Alexa for integration. He continues to talk about the importance of collaboration, "Collaborate on ideas, but complete of execution." Don't be afraid to share the ideas...you don't have to give away the execution.

Nick O'Day at GIS Manager's Open SummitGeoNet Shout Out

 

 

Be sure to go check out Michael Green's session at the GIS Managers' Open Summit on Thursday at 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. on "Increase GIS Adoption by Integrating Change Management." Take away key tools to help you drive technology adoption and speed up time value. 

 

Justin Kruizenga and Andrew Sharer will be presenting on Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Workforce Development Planning for a trained and knowledgeable workforce for technical enablement and platform adoption. 

 

GeoNet 101 Sessions

Chris Catania and Michelle Mathias teamed up to give a GeoNet 101 session where Michelle led a demonstration for navigating GeoNet to new and potential new members. If you missed today's session, be sure to come on Wednesday and Thursday. GeoNet at User Conference 2018.

 

Jack Cordes and Luis Gutierrez, Student Assistants

 

Jack Cordes and Luis Gutierrez, Student Assistants, attend a GeoNet 101 session.

Chris giving session

Chris Catania gives an introduction to the GeoNet Community at the GeoNet 101 session.

 

Our Summer Intern

Our GeoNet Inter, Shelby Connors gained experience working the GeoNet Expo booth.

Shelby Connors giving GeoNet Demo

 

Kids Fair at the Marriott

Kids Fair SwagWe stopped to play at the Kids Fair. Many activities and learning opportunities for families to bond over GIS. Check Out the Esri User Conference Behind-the-Scenes: Family Activities to learn what the family activities include at Esri UC. They also have many fun Kids Fair swag they are giving. Bring the family and stop by.

 

Tech Sessions

And if you missed it, Kory Kramer gave a session today on ArcGIS Pro - Tips & Tricks. He will be holding another session on Thursday at 2:30 p.m. in SDCC - Ballroom 20D. Kory, and others on the Customer Advocacy team, not only contributed in the comments of the Plenary Live Blog but are here showing attendees the how-tos for using ArcGIS Pro. Learn about what is new in the latest releases and how to create great maps more efficiently and quickly.

 

Check out Kory's extra tips in the comments below.

 

We have a few more events to attend to today. Keep following along on the User Conference space for further UC event updates. 

Check back with us this afternoon for the afternoon session at 2:00 p.m. where we will have special presentations from Tom Crowther of Crowther Labs in ETH Zürich, Felix Finkbeiner from the Plant-for-the-Planet Initiative, James and Deborah Fallows, and our Keynote - Juan Enriquez.

What's Next Road Map

 

We've also provided you with the Whats Next GIS Road Map. This beautifully colored graphic offers a hand-drawn detailed description of What's Next.

 

Get the highlights from this morning's sessions:

Live from the 2018 User Conference Plenary: Morning Session

Live from the 2018 User Conference Plenary: Morning Session Part 2 

Table of contents

2:00 p.m. - Jack Dangermond visits E.O. Wilson at Harvard University

 

The final plenary session begins with an opening video of an interview between Jack Dangermond and E.O. Wilson.

 

Jack asks Ed Wilson, "What do you think about the future?"

Ed responds, "I am an optimist. But, I think I was born that way." 

 

Written by Matt Ball

When thinking about “what’s next” the status of our natural world is a priority for Esri’s founder and president Jack Dangermond. He took a trip to Harvard to meet with his old friend E.O. Wilson, the celebrated author and myrmecologist (ant expert) who gave the keynote address at this conference in 1994. He simply asked, “what should be next?” in order to create a more sustainable planet. Wilson replied that biodiversity should be the focus as we’re facing a great loss, a twin crisis to that of climate change.

 

“Climate change, we can reverse that, but we can’t reverse the loss of three-quarters of the species on the Earth,” Wilson said.

 

Dangermond suggests an ecological infrastructure of protected places, echoing Wilson’s feeling that a lot of mapping is needed to know where the maximum areas of biodiversity exist. Wilson has been involved in a movement called Half Earth, which strives to save half of the Earth’s land and sea in protected areas in order to preserve the bulk of biodiversity. Eighty percent of the species are still unknown on the planet and the Half Earth effort could save 85 percent of our planet’s biodiversity. Knowing where these species are could be captured by creating an ecological spatial database.

 

“We’re moving from the 15th-century geography of discovering things and where they are, and changing it into a digitized system of thinking,” Wilson said. “It’s a whole new world.”

 

Dangermond envisions a future of digital explorers that will build models of how the ecosystems work or make decisions about where to conserve. It’s going to require a boots-on-the-ground effort of engaged citizen scientists.

 

“GIS people have a huge part to play in taking aggressive action to protect the natural world,” Dangermond says.

 

2:05 p.m. Welcome Back!

 

The Crowther Lab at ETH Zürich: Ecosystem Science for

Effective Global Restoration

Carbon Dioxide in the atmosphere

Speaker: Tom Crowther, Professor of Global ecosystem Ecology at ETH Zürich

Jack welcomes the audience back from lunch. We are committed to working with conservation and moving forward. He introduces the next speaker, Tom Crowther from the Crowther Lab at ETH Zürich takes us on a digital presentation with a call to action to the GIS community, and the world, to learn and understand the importance of biodiversity. Global ecological restoration is the key to fight the impacts of climate change, biodiversity loss, and rural poverty.

 

Atmosphere of carbon monoxideThe map to the right shows the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere during the winter months (in red) in comparison to the Spring when trees are in full bloom (in blue).

 

It is estimated that only 3% of the trees in the world make it to maturity. What we need to know is which soils these trees need to grow and survive.

 

Below the canopy's surface, below the trees and deeper down into the soil, there is a whole ecosystem that helps grow trees, grow vegetation, and understanding this ecosystem allows us to understand these ecosystems effectively we have room for another 1.2 trillion trees. 

Forest Reflectance of Trees on the Globe

 

For decades, soil scientists have been taking samples of the species in the soil. We know so little about this ecosystem, but what we learned is that the soil compositions are home to billions of nematodes.

 

We did our research to find out why some areas have more nematodes, and others have less.

 

Nematode analysis

 

With a new perspective on the diversity of the soil samples, we now know that planting a diversity of tree species has a positive impact compared to planting only the single and fastest growing tree species.

 

Jack chats with Tom briefly, "As a landscape architect, I always viewed the world as my garden." He thanks Tom for being here.

 

2:15 p.m. - The Trillion Tree Campaign 

Plant-for-the-Planet Initiative

Speaker: Felix Finkbeiner

Opening with a video of Felix Finkbeiner's inspiring words about the climate crisis.

 

Wangari Maathai (1940-2011), the founder of the Green Belt Movement, started the first movement inspiring the Trillion Tree Campaign and Felix was inspired by her movement.

 

He encouraged his fellow students to go out into the world and plant trees. He began Plant for the Planet in schools after inspiring his fellow students to plant a tree. And over time, students speaking up for the urgent problem of the climate crisis.

 

Today, more than 15 billion trees have been planted across the world as the movement spreads and support continues to grow.

 

Where do we go from here? How many trees exist in the world? And how many trees can we plant?

He asked lots of scientists and no one had an answer until he met with Tom Crowthers. He relayed that we have 3 trillion trees in the world and can still plant 1.2 trillion more.

Yucatan tree planting

When he visited the Yucatan Peninsula to find out why so much of the forest was disappearing. Today, they employ 100 employees that plant 6,000 trees a day at a cost of just 1 Euro a year to plant the trees. Many of the trees planted are funded by companies that want to be carbon neutral. May be able to plant 100-million trees in Mexico by 2020.

 

We want to make it as easy and as fun as possible for anyone to plant trees or get involved with planting trees. They created an app that is live today. Trilliontreecampaign.org.

 

Trillion Tree Campaign AppWith this app, you can record the trees you plant and if you can't plant trees, you can donate for the cause. You can track other countries to see how many trees they are planting. You can see what others are doing and follow them as well as gift them a tree to help them reach their target goal for trees.

 

Written by Matt Ball

When Felix Finkbeiner was nine years old his teacher asked him to give a presentation about climate change. He learned of Wangari Maathai who planted a million trees and urged his class to plant trees. Other students loved the idea, and they soon planted their first tree. An early website was created with a simple comparison of what school planted the most trees. Soon schools competed and they achieved the goal of a million trees planted in Germany, and scaled it to other countries. Today, there are 15Billion trees planted.

 

When we plant TREES we plant the seeds of #peace and seeds of #hope.

- Wangari Maathai

 

We had added questions. How many trees are there in the world? Scientists couldn’t answer, until we met Tom Crowther who started a three-year research project. He came back with the answers that there are three trillions trees exist and we have room for a trillion more.

 

Plant-for-the-Planet now has taken charge of 22,000 hectares, and employ 100 people planting trees in the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. People have said that paying for a trillion trees isn’t possible. However, Plant-for-the-Planet has reduced the cost of planting each tree to just 1 Euro per planted tree.

 

To reach the goal of reaching a trillion trees will require much more. To make it easier to plant trees we created a simple app (using ArcGIS) that goes live today. My personal goal is to plant 1000 trees. If I’m planting trees I can register my trees, their species and location.

 

It starts today with the Yucatan Reforestation project and will grow to other restoration projects. The app lets us see the 3 trillion trees and where more than a trillion can be planted. A leaderboard helps to promote those that are planting the most.

 

Jack Dangermond of Esri has pledged to make the conference carbon neutral by taking the data on where people have traveled from and calculating the offset. The calculation amounts to 60,000 trees.

2:33 p.m. - Our Towns – A 100,000-Mile Journey into the Heart of America

Speakers: James and Deborah Fallows

 

What's next for the planet and many of our societies brings lots of challenges. We are all responsible for the challenges. We want to leave you feeling inspired by what's next when you leave here. They share a story map of Our TOwns: Renewal from the Ground Up.

James and Deborah Fallows

 

blue-collar to white-collar jobsWe see shifts in blue-collar to white-collar manufacturing jobs, poverty shifts, drug poisoning from opioids. What surprised them is the increase in advanced higher-learning across the U.S. and the role that community colleges are providing new opportunities for those seeking to advance their education or careers. And last slide James shares is how the refugee arrivals are the U.S. is declining. 

 

Deborah follows James with a description of the changes in Greenville, South Carolina as the city improves education, jobs, partnerships, infrastructure.

 

 

She continues to share a story of poverty in Erie, Pennsylvania. In a collaborative partnership, the town of Erie, Pennsylvania is growing, prospering, and increasing in tourism, cultures, businesses, and growth in the city. 

 

James shares the history of the NRA as not gun activists, but as people who believed in reforming their cities, progressive in change for the better. He leaves with a message from the NRA motto, "We do our part" as a message to all to do our part to change the world.

 

Written by Matt Ball

Our Towns–A 100,000-Mile Journey into the Heart of America

 

For the last five years, James and Deborah Fallows have been traveling across America in a single-engine prop plane visiting dozens of towns and interviewing hundreds of civic leaders, entrepreneurs, city workers, educators, students, librarians, immigrants, artists, environmentalists, and craft brewers. The focus of this work is decidedly progressive in that it focuses on those that are forging economic and social progress in their localities.

 

The project kicked off five years ago on the Esri UC stage, with a discussion of what we could discover about our country. The book often compares divergent cities, such as Greenville, South Carolina versus Burlington, Vermont. The focus is on cities that have momentum.

 

Geographers that deploy the science of geography with Esri software would call this approach field research— "the systematic observation and collection of otherwise unavailable (primary) data." They set out to document trends and uncover the stories of progress.

 

They came away with some overriding ideas about what works. Aspects of the educational system, specifically the role of community colleges to help those looking for new opportunities, stood out as a positive force. Refugee arrivals across the country also stood out. Many up-and-coming cities have specialized in accommodating first-generation immigrants.

 

Greenville, South Carolina surprised them, with its transformation from the textile trade and the resurgence of the downtown. It’s now an economically vibrant city with advanced manufacturing for BMW, Michelin, and GE. The local schools are celebrated with an elementary school focused on engineering. The falls of the Reedy River has been liberated from a highway overpass and have become a favorite gathering place.

 

Erie, Pennsylvania was a manufacturing hub, and has seen decline including the demise of the GE locomotive plant and the loss of 10,000 jobs. A group of residents rewrote the down-and-out story, and now there are tech startups and startups. The downtown has added a number of amenities, including a number of craft breweries. The population is 10 percent refugees.

 

We have a similar inspiration and a charge to inspire what’s next.

2:53 p.m. Making a Difference Award

Jack presents the Making-A-Difference award to two teachers who have worked together for the last 8-years in Boyle Heights, California to inspire students to learn GIS, create projects that map out stories of their communities.

 

Congratulations to two amazing educators, Alice Im and Mariana Ramirez!

 

Students share the results of their findings at Esri. These students continue to share their results to advocate for their communities, for improvement and change, changing the lives of the students and their community.

 

Jack shares a video to explain why he is giving the teachers an award today. Students 

 

Making a difference award winners

 

AudienceAfter the video, the audience gives a roar of cheers. With tears of joy, both Alice and Mariana share their thanks for the partnership with Jack and Esri and what they desire. 

 

Jack thanks both for being here and the audience gives them a standing ovation. Jack asks them to return to the stage once more. 

 

 

 

3:05 p.m. Evolving Ourselves - Redesigning the Future of Humanity

Keynote Speaker, Juan Enriquez, Managing Director at Excel Venture Management

The language of the world is changing. It began as hieroglyphics and evolved over centuries as cultures learned to write and create alphabets. Today, our alphabet is continuing to evolve as the world of digital code expands our alphabet and our ability to communicate through 1s and 0s. 

 

Small changes in code have an impact on the message whether it is digital code or DNA. 

"All life is Code." 

 

“If life is code, we can read code, copy code, edit code—and it will change the world.” ~ Juan Enriquez

 

All life is Code

 

The code of Life Sciences is what is pushing mapping, pushing AI, pushing high-end mapping. Flipping the logic of Charles Darwin's theory of evolution driven by humans becomes an un-natural selection. We are deciding what lives and dies, what is non-random mutation. 

 

"We are entering an era of intelligent design."

 

As humans, we can make programmable life forms, can make almost anything. We are beginning to integrate technology with creating life. We are getting to a point in time where we can take the code in each of ourselves and make copies of ourselves. We already do this when our cells make new teeth, grow bones, new skin. And as we continue to learn how to make code, we can make anything, except for the brain. Dr. Mary Lou Jepson - Brain Mapping

 

The cutting edge of map-making will be when we can map the human brain. Dr. Mary Lou Jepson, inspired by her own brain tumor, decided to learn just how to map the brain and with the support and vision of Openwater, she is currently in the process of building a non-invasive lab size prototype for mapping the brain. 

 

3:35 p.m. Closing

Jack thanks the audience and invites everyone to the Map Gallery.