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2019

Greetings everyone:

 

I would like to announce an online course that I am teaching:  

 

 **Telling Your Story using Esri Story Maps** - This course led by Joseph Kerski will enable you to understand and incorporate interactive web-based story maps to include sound, video, photographs and other multi-media in your teaching about ecoregions, natural hazards, river systems, urban change, demographics, and much more. 

 

This course is aimed at:  The educator who is just starting out with web mapping and story maps.  So, if you know an educator that fits this description, this course would be particularly relevant to them.

This course is 5 weeks in length and includes hands-on activities, discussion, assessments, and readings.  You will learn through hand-on activities using the ArcGIS maps to enhance your curriculum for your students.  To register, click here. 

 

Here is the link:

https://www.enetlearning.org/register-for-courses/telling-your-story-with-esri-story-maps-2/

Here is the link to all of eNet’s February courses:

http://www.enetlearning.org/course-catalog-and-descriptions/

There is a small fee for the course to support the good folks at eNet Learning and the work they do to offer courses for educators.  There is an option for university credit as well.

 

--Joseph Kerski

 

Story map

ArcGIS Pro 2.3 is here! Available now for download on My Esri.  Existing ArcGIS Pro users will start getting update notifications when they start the app.  This is the biggest release of ArcGIS Pro to date, packed with new capabilities, including those requested in User Ideas.

 

List of resources to get familiar with ArcGIS Pro 2.3:

 

For ArcGIS Pro developers:

 

In addition,  visit Learn ArcGIS Pro and select ArcGIS Pro to try free online courses.

User ideas matter!  Please keep submitting your ideas to make ArcGIS Pro (and other Esri products better).  The ideas that get high votes will be likely be included in next releases.

GeoInquiries are free, short, pre-constructed classroom activities on standard classroom content using ArcGIS Online. They are easy for teachers to use as is or to adapt. "Level One" activities require a device with internet connection but no install, no download, no login, just choose and use; "Level Two" activities require at least one login with publishing privileges in order to do analysis. GeoInquiries work in a vast range of learning situations, from the one-device-plus-presentation classroom on up to totally individualized approaches.

 

GeoInquiries video

 

A newly revised 6-minute video introducing GeoInquiries is now viewable and downloadable. It provides guidance sufficient so even those brand new to ArcGIS Online can teach effectively with GeoInquiries.

 

Anyone seeking to modify GeoInquiries, or construct locally-focused versions, or see other strategies for using them, should see the GeoInquiries zone on GeoNet. It's also a great place to ask questions or post ideas for designers.

 

Share the video with colleagues! Help them discover how to take advantage of great content and tools, all free for schools and enticing to students.

This short article describes a process where Python was used to harvest metadata from a list of identified ArcGIS Online maps and the maps’ data services. The data were logged to MySQL (with pymysql); a PHP web search and discovery page was created.  The process allows for keyword searching in titles and descriptions of maps and data layers. 

 

Read more >>

Happy 2019! Ready to learn? 

 

These massive open online courses are free and those who complete a course receive a certificate. Students work at their own pace when they have time. Come join us!

 

Going Places with Spatial Analysis is a six week course that covers why geography matters and how to think like a geographer to solve problems that involve location.

 

Do-it-Yourself Geo Apps is a four week course that introduces code-free ways to turn a map into an interactive application on the Web or a mobile device.

A transect is a path across an area. Geographers, both formal and informal, often follow a transect across an area to explore the changes between here and there. Sometimes the changes are close together and dramatic; other times a transect must cover a long distance before yielding a significant change in landform, land use, building style, population density, and so on.

 

Educators can't always go on actual field trips. Limits in time, spending, and permissions may constrain what a class can do in real life. But a class that knows how to use ArcGIS Online can conduct a virtual transect, looking at many characteristics visible in the field and some that are invisible in the field. The Virtual Transect app shows you how.

 

Virtual Transect app

 

First, look at the example, a tiny town in central Washington, then think about building your own. Mark a corner of the school grounds with a map note, then create rings of a distance that one might experience on foot (0.5 miles), by bicycle (2 miles), or in a car (10 miles). Using the imagery layer (as basemap or as an added layer), mark out changes in the land radiating outward. Then add some layers from the Living Atlas to find additional changes in the patterns of land and people.

 

I did a similar description of this process years ago, when ArcGIS Online was just getting started. It is so much more powerful now, with more data, more analysis tools, more presentation options, more collaboration possible using an ArcGIS Online Organization. These tools let explore, analyze, illuminate, and describe patterns, and then determine actions to make the world a better place. While the best experience is clearly from mixing the real thing with the digital, you can begin right there in the classroom, doing a Virtual Transect.

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