jkerski-esristaff

A review of the ArcGIS Pro Cookbook

Blog Post created by jkerski-esristaff Employee on May 11, 2018

GIS Professional Tripp Corbin's book, the "ArcGIS Pro 2.x Cookbook" (2018, Packt Publishing) is new but I believe will quickly become a valued and oft-used resource. Mr Corbin's goal in writing this extensive (694 pages) resource is to help GIS professionals "create, manage, and share geographic maps, data, and analytical models using ArcGIS Pro." The audience for this book includes all who are learning GIS, or learning Pro, as well as those migrating from ArcMap to Pro.

 

Tripp's "cookbook" theme is evident throughout the book's format, where in each section and problem to be solved, he shows how to get ready, how to do it, how it works, and ... "there's more" (additional resources). That the book is from Packt is excellent, because Packt (www.packtpub.com) offers eBook versions of every one of its books, and also offers newsletters and tech articles. That Tripp is a full time trainer and instructor is evident--he understands the challenges in learning a rapidly-changing and complex technology inherent in GIS with just enough tips to keep the reader engaged. He also encourages the reader to think about how to apply each tool and method to his or her own work. He offers the reader the ability to download the sample data for the book, and the data bundle is also on GitHub. He also includes PDFs of all images of screen shots and diagrams.

 

I like Tripp's approach because, similar to my own instruction, he starts with data. He's not hesitant to discuss the benefits but also the limitations of each data format such as shp, gdb, and CAD files. He spends quality time in the book helping the reader understand how to convert data to the format that best fits his or her needs. His sections on linking tables from outside sources to existing data, on editing (in particular, a focus on topologies to improve data accuracy and increasing editing efficiency), and on 2D and 3D analysis are very helpful. I was pleased to see much attention to what I consider to be a chief advantage of Pro--the ability to more easily share content from Pro to ArcGIS Online and hence the wider community. Another wonderful new function in ArcGIS Pro is also included in the book--writing and using Arcade scripts, applied to symbology, classification, and analysis.

 

As a GIS book author myself, I know the challenges faced in writing such a book--what should be included, and what should be left out? Tripp does a nice job here as well, including the fundamentals that most users will touch. The book's chapters include: 1: Capabilities and terminology. 2: Creating and storing data. 3: Linking data together. 4: Editing spatial and tabular data. 5: Validating and editing data with topologies. 6: Projections and coordinate systems. 7: Converting data from one format to another. 8: Proximity analysis. 9: Spatial statistics and hot spots. 10: 3D maps and 3D analyst. 11: Arcade, labeling and symbology expressions. 12: ArcGIS Online, 13: Publishing your own content to ArcGIS Online. 14: Creating web apps using ArcGIS Online.

 

These chapters cover a great deal of ground. In the editing chapter, for example (Chapter 4), configuring editing options, reshaping existing, splitting, merging, aligning, creating new point line polygon features, creating new polygon feature using autocomplete, and editing attributes using attribute pane and in the table view, are all examined. The examples in the book are interesting and relevant, and not without some humor (Trippville is a community that is often studied). In my view, the book contains just the right amount of graphics. Tripp provides answers to the questions he poses, and then gives the explanation for each answer. Despite the "recipes" provided in the cookbook, not all of them require the previous recipe to be used, which is excellent for all of us in GIS who have limited time and want to select sections in a non-sequential order.

 

I highly recommend using this book in conjunction with Tripp's other book on this topic, "Learning ArcGIS Pro." The Learning book focuses on installing, assigning licenses, navigating the interface, creating and managing projecrts, creating 2D and 3D maps, authoring map layouts, importing existing projects, creating standardized workflows using tasks, and automating analysis and processes using modelbuilder and python. The Learning ArcGIS Pro book ideally should be used first, before the ArcGIS Pro 2.x Cookbook, but if you are pressed for time, these two books could be used in tandem. Keep both of them handy--they will be very useful to you.

 

Tripp Corbin's GIS books.

The cover of Tripp Corbin's ArcGIS Pro Cookbook, left, along with his earlier book, Learning ArcGIS Pro.

 

Tripp Corbin's GIS book.

An example of the detailed screenshots that Tripp Corbin's ArcGIS Pro Cookbook contains. 

 

Tripp Corbin's GIS book.

Tripp Corbin's GIS book.

Additional examples of the details that Tripp Corbin's ArcGIS Pro Cookbook contains. 

Outcomes